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Sylvester McCoy
Remembrance of the Daleks
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Synopsis


The Doctor and Ace Battle The Daleks
The Doctor and Ace Battle The Daleks
 London 1963. The first Doctor is forced to leave Earth, after two teachers from his granddaughter’s school discover the TARDIS, disguised as a police box, sitting in a junkyard…

 London 1963. The seventh Doctor returns - with new companion Ace in tow and with unfinished business.

 Not for the first time, unusual events are unfolding at Coal Hill School and at Totters Lane junkyard. The Doctor discovers that his oldest foes - the Daleks - are on the trail of hidden Time Lord technology. Technology that he himself left behind on Earth all those years ago. The Daleks are planning to perfect their own time-travel capability, in order to unleash themselves across all of time and space. Can The Doctor - with the help of the local military - stop the Daleks stealing the Gallifreyan secrets? Or are things much more complicated?

 Two opposing Dalek factions meet in an explosive confrontation, with the fate of the entire Universe at stake…

Source: BBC DVD


General Information

Season: Twenty Five
Production Code: 7H
Story Number: 148
Episode Numbers:668 - 671
Number of Episodes: 4
Percentage of Episodes Held:100%
Working Titles:"Nemesis of The Doctor"
Production Dates: April 1988
Broadcast Started: 05 October 1988
Broadcast Finished: 26 October 1988
Colour Status: Colour
Studio: BBC Television Centre (TC8)
Location: Southwark, London: Theed Street, Wootton Street, Windmill Walk.
East Acton, London: Braybrook Street, Wulfstan Street, TAVC (Horn Lane), Old Oak Common Lane.
Hammersmith, London: Macbeth Centre, Macbeth Street, St John's School.
Others: Kew Bridge Steam Museum (Brentford, Middlesex), Willesden Lane Cemetery (Willesden, London), John Nodes Funeral Service (181 Ladbroke Grove, London).
Writer:Ben Aaronovitch
Director:Andrew Morgan
Producer:John Nathan-Turner
Script Editor:Andrew Cartmel
Production Assistant:Rosemary Parsons
Production Associates:June Collins and Hilary Barratt (Uncredited)
Assistant Floor Managers:Lynn Grant and Val McCrimmon
Designer:Martin Collins
Costume Designer:Ken Trew
Make-Up Designer:Christine Greenwood
Cameramen:Barry Chaston (Outside Broadcast) and Robin Sutherland (Outside Broadcast)
Incidental Music:Keff McCulloch
Special Sounds (SFX Editor):Dick Mills
Studio Sounds:Scott Talbott
Lighting:Henry Barber
Visual Effects:Stuart Brisdon
Title Sequence:Oliver Elmes
Title Music:Ron Grainer and the BBC Radiophonic Workshop. Arranged by Keff McCulloch
Stunt Arranger: Tip Tipping
Daleks Originally Created By: Terry Nation
Number of Doctors: 1
The Doctor: Sylvester McCoy (The Seventh Doctor)
Number of Companions: 1The Companion: Sophie Aldred (Ace) Additional Cast: Simon Williams (Group Captain Gilmore), Pamela Salem (Professor Rachel Jensen), Terry Molloy (Davros / Emperor Dalek), Dursley McLinden (Mike Smith), Karen Gledhill (Allison), George Sewell (Ratcliffe), Michael Sheard (Headmaster), Harry Fowler (Harry), Jasmine Breaks (The Girl), Peter Hamilton Dyer (Embery), John Leeson (Voice), Peter Halliday (Vicar), Joseph Marcell (John), William Thomas (Martin), Derek Keller (Kaufman), Hugh Spight (Dalek Operator), John Scott Martin (Dalek Operator), Tony Starr (Dalek Operator), Cy Town (Dalek Operator), Roy Skelton (Dalek Voice), Brian Miller (Dalek Voice), Royce Mills (Dalek Voice)Setting: Shoreditch, London (1963) Villains: Daleks, Davros and Ratcliffe

The Episodes

No. Episodes Broadcast
(UK)
Duration Viewers
(Millions)
In Archive
668Part 105 October 198824'33"5.5PAL 1" colour videotape
669Part 212 October 198824'31"5.8PAL 1" colour videotape
670Part 319 October 198824'30"5.1PAL 1" colour videotape
671Part 426 October 198824'36"5.0PAL 1" colour videotape

Total Duration 1 Hour 38 Minutes


Audience Appreciation

Average Viewers (Millions) 5.4
Doctor Who Magazine Poll (1998)84.56%  (Position = 7 out of 159)
Doctor Who Magazine Poll (2003)878 Points (Position = 7 out of 159)
Doctor Who Magazine Poll (2009)84.24% Lower (Position = 14 out of 200)
Doctor Who Magazine Poll (2014)87.58% Higher (Position = 10 out of 241)


Archives


 All four episodes exist as PAL 1” colour videotapes. A 71-edit scratch print of all episodes also exists.



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Notes

Only the First 50 Story Notes are shown below - Click to Show All Story Notes


"Remembrance of the Daleks" opened the Twenty Fifth Anniversary of the show. It contained many references to its history.and is set in 1963, the same year Doctor Who started with the First Doctor story "An Unearthly Child". "Remembrance of the Daleks" returns The Doctor to Coal Hill School and the junkyard at 76 Totter's Lane. It also explains (somewhat) what The Doctor was doing on Earth at that time and also continues the story arc of a civil war between rival Dalek factions, culminating in a titanic showdown between The Doctor and Dalek Emperor, who is revealed as being Davros.

This story features guest appearances by Pamela Salem and Michael Sheard.

Pamela Salem, who played the part of Rachel Jensen, had previously played the part of Toos in the 1977 Fourth Doctor story "The Robots of Death". While Michael Sheard, who played the part of the headmaster, is more famous for playing the part of Mr. Bronson in the children’s television series Grange Hill between 1985 and 1989. He had also previously appeared: as Rhos, in the second episode of the 1966 First Doctor story "The Ark", Doctor Summers in the 1971 Third Doctor story "The Mind of Evil", Lowe in the 1977 Fourth Doctor story "The Invisible Enemy" and Mergrave in the 1982 Fifth Doctor story "Castrovalva".

Terry Molloy returned for his third and final outing as Davros. His appearance in episode three (prior to the Emperor Dalek being unveiled as Davros) was credited using the anagram ‘Roy Tromelly’ to avoid giving away the surprise of Davros’ return.

John Leeson, who is famous for being the voice of K9, provided the voice of the Dalek computer. This was his last contribution in the original run of the show. He later returned, as K9, in the 2006 Tenth Doctor story "School Reunion" – along with Elizabeth Sladen who played Sarah Jane Smith.

Brian Miller, husband of Elisabeth Sladen, provided a Dalek voice, a position he also filled for the 1984 Fifth Doctor story "Resurrection of the Daleks".

Simon Williams, who played Group Captain Gilmore, was one of the stars of LWT’s Upstairs, Downstairs. Simon Williams also played the part of Paul Addison in the Big Finish Productions audio story "Nekromanteia".

William Thomas, who appears as Martin, returned to the show, playing the part of Mr Cleaver, in the 2005 Ninth Doctor story "Boom Town", making him the first actor to appear in both the original run and the revised series of Doctor Who. He later also played the part of Geraint Cooper, the father of Gwen Cooper, in the 2008 Torchwood story "Something Borrowed" and the 2011 series Torchwood: Miracle Day. He is the first actor to appear in both shows.

Joseph Marcell, who appears as John, is better known for playing Geoffrey Butler on The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air.

Peter Halliday, who played the Vicar, previously played the part of Packer in the 1968 Second Doctor story "The Invasion". He also provided the Silurian voices in the 1970 Third Doctor story "Doctor Who and the Silurians", alien voices in the 1970 Third Doctor story "The Ambassadors of Death", Pletrac in the 1973 Third Doctor story "Carnival of Monsters" and a soldier in the 1979 Fourth Doctor story "City of Death".

Stratford Johns, who appeared as Monarch in the 1982 Fifth Doctor story "Four to Doomsday", was originally offered the part of Ratcliffe while Mark McGann, the brother of Eighth Doctor actor Paul McGann, was originally considered for the role of Mike Smith.

Dalek creator Terry Nation was given the chance to write a story for this season, but turned it down. Terry Nation however, invoked his right to approve any scripts featuring the Daleks. Script Editor Andrew Cartmel contacted Ben Aaronovitch to write a four-part Dalek story. In line with a more serious approach to Doctor Who, Ben Aaronovitch reinvested the Daleks with a greater degree of menace.

Aware that it was the show’s Twenty Ffifth Anniversary Ben Aaronovitch’s initial idea, called "Nemesis of The Doctor", was littered with connections to "An Unearthly Child" until it was pointed out that the 1985 Sixth Doctor story "Attack of the Cybermen" had revisited the setting (albeit set in 1985). He therefore scaled back some of his references.

Ben Aaronovitch drew on the ideas put forward in the most recent Dalek story, the 1985 Sixth Doctor story "Revelation of the Daleks", of a schism in the Dalek ranks. Consequently, he included two Dalek factions - ‘Red Daleks’ led by the Emperor Dalek (from the 1967 Second Doctor story "The Evil of the Daleks") and ‘Blue Daleks’ led by the Black Dalek (also called the Dalek Supreme). Ben Aaronovitch also considered bringing back the Thals and the Ogrons but he eventually rejected these for fear of overcomplicating the story.

Visual Effects Designer Mike Tucker initiated the idea to build a domed Emperor Dalek prop (like the version seen in the TV Century 21 Dalek comic strip) which would split open to reveal Davros inside. Ben Aaronovitch liked Mike Tucker's idea and so wrote Davros into the final scenes. Unfortunately, it was principally this element which met with Terry Nation's disapproval when he was sent Ben Aaronovitch's drafts for vetting. After a great deal of debate, John Nathan-Turner managed to convince Terry Nation to let this story proceed, after agreeing to expand Davros’ role.

When the scripts for this story were delivered it was realised that Ben Aaronovitch had badly overwritten all four episodes. To compensate, several subplots – including a threatened nuclear strike on London, a dangerous trip from Totter's Lane to Coal Hill School for The Doctor and Ace, and Harry's extermination by the Daleks - were eliminated. Also removed was an exchange in which The Doctor tells Mike that the aliens are called Daleks, which explains why Rachel knows their name in later scenes.

The most significant change, from Ben Aaronovitch’s original script, was when The Doctor destroys the Black Dalek in episode four. Originally this would have been with a gun, which had been stored alongside the Hand of Omega. This was intended as a parody of the quick-draw tradition in Hollywood westerns, but it was felt that this was out of character for The Doctor. Ben Aaronovitch therefore rewrote the scene so that The Doctor talks the Black Dalek into destroying itself.

The director assigned to this story was Andrew Morgan, who had previously directed last season’s "Time and The Rani". However, because of the complexity of the production, John Nathan-Turner assisted Andrew Morgan by directing various second-unit shots.

Andrew Morgan and Visual Effects Designer Stuart Brisdon decided to ignore Ben Aaronovitch’s suggestions of ‘Red’ and ‘Blue’ Daleks in favour of giving the Imperial Daleks a white-and-gold livery, and the Renegade Daleks a more traditional grey-and-black scheme. This was done partly to maintain continuity with "Revelation of the Daleks", but also to save the trouble of repainting the Dalek props remaining from that production. In the end, though, because so many Daleks were required for this story, all the existing Dalek props ended up becoming Renegades while the Imperial Daleks had to be newly constructed, along with the Emperor Dalek while the Black Dalek was borrowed from BBC Enterprises and refurbished. However, these requirements, combined with the Dalek spacecraft, the considerable pyrotechnics, and various other demands eventually pushed the visual effects costs over budget.

Location work took place at a variety of London locations. Famously the explosions caused by the Dalek battle recorded, on the first day, were of such magnitude that it set off a large number of car alarms resulting in the police arriving to investigate what was believed to be a possible terrorist attack by the Irish Republican Army!

St John's School in Hammersmith was used for Coal Hill School. While for the Totters Lane junkyard it had originally been hoped that the location used in the "Attack of the Cybermen", in Acton, might be revisited. Unfortunately, its proximity to local residences made it impossible to carry out the necessary pyrotechnics and so a new site near Kew Bridge railway station was chosen instead.

A continuity error occurred, during this location recording, when the sign painter printed the name on the Totters Lane junkyard as ‘L.M. Forman’ instead of ‘I.M. Foreman’. Although the 'L' could easily be changed to an 'I', the missing 'e' could not be corrected in time for recording. This was later addressed in the BBC Books’ The Past Doctors Stories novel "The Algebra of Ice", as a race of creatures taking the form of mathematical equations causing a number of minor, self-correcting temporal disruptions in the vicinity of The Doctor, including the miss-spelling of ‘Foreman’ to ‘Forman’.

Post-production of this story was more intensive than usual, mainly due to the many effects sequences. Unfortunately, the Dalek voiceovers were omitted from one scene, in which the headmaster attacks Mike. Meanwhile, various scenes were trimmed for timing reasons. The only significant cut was to the exchange between The Doctor and Davros where Davros accuses The Doctor of being ‘merely another Time Lord’, to which The Doctor responds that he is ‘far more than just another Time Lord’. This, along with The Doctor's hint that he was present at the creation of the Hand of Omega, was the first outward statement of the new direction John Nathan-Turner and Andrew Cartmel wanted to take the show. This was part of the plan to restore some of the mystery to The Doctor's origins. More hints would surface over the next two seasons and The Seventh Doctor, from this point on, grew darker and more manipulative.

The first episode of this story begins with a pre-title sequence which includes voiceovers from famous speeches made by JFK, Charles de Gaulle, the Duke of Edinburgh and Martin Luther King. This is not the first time a story started with a pre-title sequence (other examples being the 1982 Fifth Doctor story "Castrovalva", the Twentieth Anniversary special "The Five Doctors" and the 1987 Seventh Doctor story "Time and The Rani"). Pre-title sequences would become a regular part of the show’s format when the show was revived in 2005 - starting with the Ninth Doctor story "The End of the World".

The fact that no reference is made to JFK’s death (the major world event in 1963) suggests that the story takes place before November 22nd. It is also noted that these events take place ‘a few weeks’ after "An Unearthly Child".

The Doctor is heard telling Ace that the Daleks conquered the Earth in the 22nd century, referring to events in the 1964 First Doctor story "The Dalek Invasion of Earth". He also tells Ace about Spiridon, which he visited along with companion Jo Grant in the 1973 Third Doctor story "Planet of the Daleks", and the war between the Kaleds and the Thals, and how the mutation of the Kaleds was accelerated by Davros (see the 1975 Fourth Doctor story "Genesis of the Daleks").

The Doctor is heard telling Ace about Rassilon, Omega and the Hand of Omega. He also states that he has 900 years’ experience with alien technology and he describes himself as ‘The Doctor, President-elect of the High Council of Time Lords. Keeper of the legacy of Rassilon. Defender of the Laws of Time, Protector of Gallifrey’. While he did become President in the 1976 Fourth Doctor story "The Deadly Assassin", then assumed the role in the 1978 story "The Invasion of Time" and was appointed once again as President in the Twentieth Annivessary special "The Five Doctors", by the time of the Sixth Doctor’s trial in "The Trial of a Time Lord" The Doctor had been removed from office due to his absence. While The Doctor was offered the opportunity to run for the position again at the end of his trial, he declined.

In Ben Aaronovitch’s original script ‘The Hand of Omega’ was originally called ‘The Hand of Rassilon’.

At this stage, the Daleks are seen to have split into two factions - Imperial Daleks (led by Davros) and Renegade Daleks (led by the Black Dalek). Davros has augmented the Imperial Daleks with cybernetic implants, whereas the Renegade Daleks have remained 'pure'. Although not explicitly stated, it can be reasonably inferred that the Imperial Faction have control of the Dalek home planet Skaro.

Several elements in this story were designed to surprise viewers familiar with previous Dalek stories. Initially leading the viewer to think that the figure, speaking to Ratcliffe and commanding the Renegade Daleks, as being Davros. However, this figure is revealed to be a kidnapped schoolgirl and the Imperial Daleks are commanded by Davros.

The Imperial Daleks have a Special Weapons Dalek while the Renegade Daleks use a human child operating their battle computer. In the original script, the Special Weapons Dalek was on the Renegades Dalek’s side, and, rather then having great firepower, had the ability to fire around corners. The Imperial Daleks possessed a flying battle platform, a concept which was scrapped due to cost.

This is the first instance of the ‘skeleton effect’ caused by Dalek weapons - an effect that would be used in every subsequent Dalek story.

A myth existed that this story revealed for the first time that the Daleks are capable of ascending stairs. Although this is the first time that this is actually seen. There is a scene in the 1965 First Doctor story "The Chase" in which such an occurrence is clearly implied. A Dalek was also seen hovering, with the aid of an anti-gravitational disk, in the 1973 Third Doctor story "Planet of the Daleks" and both Davros and the Daleks were seen to hover in "Revelation of the Daleks".

The Doctor's exchange with Davros where Davros says ‘You tricked me!’ and The Doctor replies with ‘No, Davros. You tricked yourself’ mirrors a conversation the Sixth Doctor had with Borad in the 1985 story "Timelash".

Davros is heard to comment on The Doctor’s ‘inconstant’ appearance. This is a reference to the fact that in this and the previous three stories to feature Davros, there has been a different incarnation of The Doctor.

In the first episode, where Ace and Mike are walking to the van, Ace is being taught the pre-decimalisation money system by Mike - Ace having grown up after decimalisation. This scene is similar to the way Barbara Wright also needed to explain shillings and pence to Susan in "An Unearthly Child".

During a scene, in Coal Hill School, Ace is seen looking at a book on the French Revolution. This is a nod to the book that Susan was reading in the first episode of "An Unearthly Child".

The Doctor is heard to comment that the destruction of Ace’s tape deck is a good thing when he says ‘the whole microchip revolution would take place now, twenty years too early’. He, however, builds her a new one before the events of "Silver Nemesis".

Ace is heard to query The Doctor that if there had been an invasion in 1963 she would have heard about it. He replies with: ‘Do you remember the Zygon gambit with the Loch Ness Monster? Or the Yeti in the underground? Your species has an amazing capacity for self deception’. The Doctor’s statement is a reference to events that occurred in the 1975 Fourth Doctor story "Terror of the Zygons" and the 1968 Second Doctor story "The Web of Fear".

In one scene, Dr Rachel Jensen makes mention of a ‘Bernard’ and ‘the British Rocket Group’. This is a reference to Bernard Quatermass and the British Experimental Rocket Group as seen in Nigel Kneale’s science-fiction series, Quatermass. The Rocket Group is again mentioned in the 2005 Tenth Doctor story "The Christmas Invasion" and Bernard Quatermass gets a mention in the 2009 Tenth Doctor story "Planet of the Dead".

A special tribute comes in the midst of this story when Ace leaves the living room, at the boarding house, and on a television set a continuity announcer is heard to say: ‘This is BBC television, the time is quarter past five and Saturday viewing continues with an adventure in the new science fiction series Do...’. The BBC continuity announcer though is cut off by a scene change before completing the title.

Despite this seemingly obvious tribute to Doctor Who it has been argued that it can’t be referring to the show as the time is 5.15 and as this story is set in November outside should be dark but it's not! Also later events do not indicate it being in the evening. However in the Special Edition DVD feature, on the making of this story, writer Ben Aaronovich acknowledges that this story was intended to be set in November.

When asked to sign a document, The Doctor's hand movements clearly indicate that he signs it using a question mark. Also The Doctor leaves the Renegade Daleks a calling card containing a question mark and theta sigma (see the 1979 Fourth Doctor "The Armageddon Factor") - one of the more overt suggestions in the show’s history about The Doctor’s mysterious origins.

The undertaker is heard to refer to the fact that he thought The Doctor was supposed to be an ‘old geezer with white hair’ meaning the First Doctor hid the Hand of Omega in the coffin. While the blind vicar comments that The Doctor’s voice has changed in the month since they last spoke. The Doctor is heard to reply that his voice ‘has changed, several times’.

The grave in which the Hand of Omega is buried bears the symbol Ω. Apart from changing Ace’s baseball bat into a Dalek killing machine, the device sends the sun of the Dalek’s home planet, Skaro, supernova.

The character of Ratcliffe was originally called Gummer. This was changed as it was felt that it sounded too similar to Gilmore. The Doctor is also heard to refer to Group Captain Gilmore as ‘Brigadier’ – a reference to The Brigadier played by Nicholas Courtney.

This is the first Doctor Who story broadcast in stereo (as well as one of the first such programmes in the UK). From this story onwards the original run of the show would be transmitted with NICAM stereo sound. But except for the 1996 Eighth Doctor film "Doctor Who: The Movie", this though was only in the London region, via the Crystal Palace transmitter, and in Yorkshire via the Emley Moor transmitter.

This was the third time The Daleks appeared in a season opener (the 1972 Third Doctor story "Day of the Daleks" opened Season Nine and the 1979 Fourth Doctor story "Destiny of the Daleks" opened Season Seventeen).

This story contains a number of errors. Namely: One of the soldiers does a good impression of Dad’s Army’s Lance Corporal Jones, coming to attention five seconds after everyone else; The Doctor is heard to pronounce the planet Spiridon incorrectly; Rachel talks to Allison about the Dalek in the junkyard without being told the name; In the first episode a camera can be seen when the headmaster appears; While at the end of this episode the Imperiel Dalek is shown to have a wire on its left side in the front shot; In the second episode, during the scene in the undertaker’s, the editor mismatches footage, making Ace’s baseball bat appear to suddenly switch from The Doctor's left hand to his right. Similarly, in another scene, the first soldier to be exterminated has a gun in his left hand which then switches to his right hand; at another point in the second episode, when the Renegade Daleks move onto the streets, in a close-up shot, you can see the section between the head and middle section coming off; Despite being set in 1963 when The Doctor and Ace are driving the van, they fleetingly pass some 1980’s style graffiti in the background. Also a lot of modern cars are visible in this story; At the start of the third episode, Mike sticks some explosives on the Dalek to the left, but it is the one of the right that is destroyed first; During the battle scene, in the fourth episode, the gates of Ratcliffe’s yard are clearly a rather ill-fitted prop. This is particularly noticeable when the gate opens and the path of its swing does not match the groove in the ground; Near the end of the fourth episode, when the little girl knocks Mike back against the stairs they can clearly be seen to move away from the wall revealing the plain grey backing of the set wall. Also Mike’s body clearly comes to rest on the stairs, but later he is shown to be on the floor in front of the stairs.

This was the last appearance of Davros and the Daleks in the original run of the show. Except for a brief appearance in the 1996 Eighth Doctor film, "Doctor Who: The Movie", the Daleks would return in the 2005 Ninth Doctor story "Dalek" while Davros would not return until the 2008 Tenth Doctor story "The Stolen Earth/Journey's End" twenty years later.


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First and Last

The Firsts:

 The first story of Season Twenty Five.

 The first time we see a Dalek actually ascending stairs.

 The first instance of the ‘skeleton effect’ caused by Dalek weapons.

 The first Doctor Who story to be written by Ben Aaronovitch.

 The first Doctor Who story broadcast in stereo.


The Lasts (Subject to Future Stories):

 The last story, in the original run of Doctor Who, to feature the Daleks.

 The last story, in the original run of Doctor Who, to feature the Davros.

 John Leeson's last involvement in the original run of the show.

 The last Doctor Who story to be directed by Andrew Morgan.


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The Plot

WARNING: May Contain SpoilersHide Text
Ace and The Doctor
Ace and The Doctor

The TARDIS arrives on Earth in 1963, in an alleyway near Coal Hill School. While The Doctor investigates a van parked in the street his travelling companion, Ace, goes to get some food from a nearby café, where she meets a young territorial army sergeant called Mike Smith. After inspecting the van The Doctor wanders into the school playground. There he discovers four scorch marks on the ground. Also watching him is a little girl who appears to know who he is.

The Doctor then returns to the van and bursts in through the back doors. Inside he meets Professor Rachel Jensen, a scientific advisor to the army, who tells him that she has been monitoring some unusual transmissions. As Ace and Mike return from the café a message is received to return to a junkyard in Totter’s Lane. There The Doctor meets Group Captain Gilmore, who reveals that a ‘hostile’ is penned in one of the sheds. As more soldiers arrive as reinforcements The Doctor realises that they are dealing with a Dalek which starts to attack them. The soldiers are easy targets for the Dalek and so The Doctor uses some of Ace’s nitro-9 explosive to destroy the creature.

Ace and The Doctor then head back to the school in the van. On the way, The Doctor explains to Ace that the Daleks are after the Hand of Omega, a relic from Gallifrey that he brought to Earth in a previous incarnation. On arriving at the school, the headmaster initially refuses The Doctor and Ace permission to look around, but then changes his mind as if receiving orders from elsewhere. In the school’s cellar The Doctor and Ace find a transmat system just as a Dalek starts to appear. The Doctor fiddles with the equipment and it vanishes again but then they are suddenly attacked by another Dalek. Ace manages to get out of the cellar, but the waiting headmaster knocks her to the ground and locks The Doctor in with the Dalek, which starts to ascend the stairs towards him. Ace quickly recovers and, after dealing with the headmaster, she frees The Doctor before the Dalek can reach him.

The Doctor Outside the TARDIS
The Doctor Outside the TARDIS

After visiting the Army’s headquarters The Doctor and Ace return to the school with an anti-tank missile. The Doctor intends to destroy the transmat but Ace uses the weapon on a Dalek, destroying it. The Doctor is perturbed as he fears a Dalek attack and wants the area evacuated. He hurries off, leaving Ace to stay with Mike in a boarding house owned by Mike’s mother. That night more Daleks arrive at the school via the transmat.

The next morning, The Doctor arrives at an undertaker’s parlour to collect a mysterious box that he left there on a previous visit to Earth. He is left alone with the box while the undertaker’s assistant contacts his boss. The Doctor orders the box to open and ‘processes’ Ace’s baseball bat. He then orders it to close again and leaves, the box floating along behind him. The Doctor takes the box to a cemetery where a blind priest leads him to an open grave, into which the box sinks. Unbeknown to The Doctor a man named Ratcliffe, who had been called in to help clear up the debris after the army operation, is told by a Dalek-creature in his builders yard that the device has been located.

Group Captain Gilmore and The Doctor
Group Captain Gilmore and The Doctor

Back at the army headquarters, and with The Doctor’s help, a Dalek mothership is detected in geostationary orbit and The Doctor realises that there are two opposing Dalek factions at work. He therefore creates a device to interfere with the Daleks’ control systems. Meanwhile Ace, having been instructed to stay at the boarding house, soon becomes bored and so decides to return to the school to retrieve her ghetto blaster which got left behind there earlier. However, when she switches it on it picks up the Dalek transmissions revealing that they are planning to attack. She hurries away, using the enhanced baseball bat to destroy any Daleks that get in her way, but she becomes trapped by three Daleks near the school entrance. The Doctor arrives in the nick of time, having been notified that Ace had gone missing and that multiple signals had been received from the school. The Doctor disables the Daleks with his device while soldiers use plastic explosives to destroy them.

The Doctor returns to the school’s cellar and smashes the transmat with the baseball bat. He explains to Ace that he is simply trying to keep the army out of the way so as to prevent Group Captain Gilmore and his men from being killed while the two Dalek factions battle for ownership of the Hand of Omega. The Hand of Omega, he explains, is really a remote stellar manipulator device and the Daleks want it in order to gain full mastery of time travel. The Doctor intends to let the Daleks have the Hand of Omega, but he must ensure that it goes to the right faction of Daleks.

Meanwhile Ratcliffe has discovered the grave containing the Hand of Omega and when he pushes a metal probe into the soft earth it suddenly crackles with energy. This is detected by the Dalek mothership in space, and the Dalek Emperor orders that an assault shuttle be prepared. Ratcliffe arranges for the Hand of Omega to be dug up and transported to his yard. A Black Dalek is waiting there and takes possession of the Hand of Omega before ordering the extermination of Ratcliffe’s men. In Ratcliffe’s office, the Dalek-creature is revealed to be the young girl, who is being used as a human interface with the Daleks’ battle computer. The Black Dalek then orders that the Time Controller to be activated. Soon afterwards The Doctor and Ace arrive and The Doctor deactivates the Time Controller. He also checks with the Hand of Omega that it knows what to do. He then rejoins with Ace and they leave avoiding patrolling Daleks along the way.

The Girl
The Girl

As the renegade Daleks and soldiers battle outside the school, the Imperial Dalek shuttle heads for Earth. The Renegade Daleks withdraw on the orders of the battle computer and the shuttle lands in the school playground. Imperial Daleks then emerge, intent on capturing the Hand of Omega. As the two Dalek forces clash the Imperial Daleks deploy a Special Weapons Dalek to wipe out the opposition. This enables them to storm Ratcliffe’s yard and take control of the Hand of Omega. With the Daleks preoccupied The Doctor is able to disable the control Dalek in the shuttle and discover that the Imperial Daleks will be returning to Skaro. During the Imperial Daleks attack on the yard Ratcliffe is killed by a bolt of electricity fired by the little girl from her hands. In the confusion Mike, who had earlier been arrested when it was revealed that he had been working for Ratcliffe and had then escaped from custody, absconds with the Time Controller. The Imperial Daleks though are only interested in the Hand of Omega which they take back to the shuttle, which then returns to the mothership.

After sending Ace after Mike, The Doctor uses the broken transmat system, in the school cellar, to build a transmitter with which to communicate with the Dalek mothership. The Dalek Emperor is revealed to be Davros, and The Doctor goads him into using the Hand of Omega against Earth. When activated, however, the Hand of Omega destroys Skaro’s sun (which in turn destroys Skaro) and then returns to the mothership. On realising that The Doctor has tricked him Davros makes a hasty retreat to an escape pod which departs from the mothership seconds before it is destroyed. The device then travels back to Gallifrey.

Back at the boarding house Ace is captured by Mike, who still has the Time Controller. The little girl though tracks him down and kills him, with a bolt of energy, before then turning her attention to Ace. Meanwhile The Doctor and Gilmore find the Black Dalek outside Ratcliffe’s yard. The Doctor convinces the Dalek that it has been defeated and is the last of its kind still alive. This causes the Dalek to self destruct breaking the link with the controlled girl who is then comforted by Ace.

Later, at Mike’s funeral Ace asks The Doctor if what they did was good which he replies: ‘Perhaps. Time will tell. It always does’.

 
Levitation
Levitation
The Daleks Arrive
The Daleks Arrive
The Special Weapons Dalek
The Special Weapons Dalek
Ace
Ace
 
Daleks
Daleks
The Emperor Dalek
The Emperor Dalek
Davros
Davros
Dalek Battle
Dalek Battle




Quote of the Story


 'Dalek! You have been defeated. Surrender! You have failed. Your forces are destroyed, your home planet a burnt cinder circling a dead sun. Even Davros, your creator, is dead! You have no superiors, no inferiors, no reinforcements, no hope, no rescue! You're trapped, a trillion miles and a thousand years from a disintegrated home. I have defeated you. You no longer serve any purpose.'

The Doctor



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Release Information

FormatTitleRelease Date (UK)Code NumberCover ArtRemarks
Audio
LP
The Doctor Who 25th Anniversary Album1988REC 707Music score
Audio
Tape
The Doctor Who 25th Anniversary Album1988ZCF 707Music score
Audio
CD
The Doctor Who 25th Anniversary Album1988Music score
Audio
CD
Music From Doctor Who1988CD 579Music score
Audio
CD
Myths and Other Legends1991FILMCD 088Photo-montageSound effects
Audio
CD
30 Years at the Radiophonic Workshop1993BBC CD 871Photo-montageSound effects
Video
VHS
Remembrance of the DaleksSeptember 1993BBCV 5007Andrew SkilleterPart of a Limited Edition Daleks Box Set (BBCV 5005)
Video
DVD
Remembrance of the DaleksFebruary 2001BBCDVD 1040Photo-montage
Video
VHS
Remembrance of the DaleksSeptember 2001BBCV 7255Photo-montageRemastered version Part of the "The Davros Collection Boxed Set" released by WH Smith
Audio
CD
Evolution - The Music From Dr WhoDecember 2001Music score
Video
DVD
Remembrance of the Daleks2003BBCDVD 1384Part of "Dalek Collector's Edition" Box Set also containing "The Dalek Invasion of Earth" and "Resurrection of the Daleks" Exclusive to W H Smith
Video
DVD
Remembrance of the DaleksJanuary 2007BBCDVD 2261Part of "The Dalek" Box Set containing 5 Dalek stories Exclusive to Amazon
Video
DVD
Remembrance of the DaleksJuly 2007BBCDVD 2472Photo-montageRe-released with a special "O-ring" slipcover
Video
DVD
Remembrance of the DaleksNovember 2007BBCDVD 2508Photo-montagePart of the "The Davros Collection" Box Set containing 5 Davros stories
Video
DVD
Remembrance of the DaleksJuly 2009BBCDVD 2451Special Edition
Audio
CD
The 50th Anniversary CollectionDecember 2013Photo-montageOriginal Television Soundtracks


In Print

FormatTitleRelease Date (UK)PublisherAuthorCover ArtRemarks
Novel
Novel
Remembrance of the DaleksJune 1990Target No. 148Ben AaronovitchAlister PearsonISBN: 0-426-20337-2
Novel
Novel
Remembrance of the DaleksMarch 2013Target No. 148Ben Aaronovitch50th Anniversary Edition. ISBN: 978-184990-598-5
CD
CD
Remembrance of the DaleksFebruary 2015Target No. 148Ben AaronovitchAlister PearsonAudio version of the Target Novel read by Nicholas Briggs and Terry Molloy (Davros)
Doctor Who CMS Magazine (In Vision)Issue 96 (Released: May 2001)
Doctor Who Magazine - PreviewIssue 140 (Released: September 1988)
Doctor Who Magazine - ArticleIssue 299 (Released: January 2001)
Doctor Who Magazine - Time TeamIssue 406 (Released: April 2009)
Doctor Who Magazine - The Fact of FictionIssue 464 (Released: October 2013)
Doctor Who Magazine Special - Archive1993 Summer Special (Released: 1993)
Doctor Who DVD FilesVolume 29 (Released: February 2010)

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Photo Gallery


The Doctor and Companion

 
Sylvester McCoy
The Seventh Doctor

   

 
Sophie Aldred
Ace
 
   




On Release

Audio LP - Doctor Who the 25th Anniversary Album
Audio LP - Doctor Who the 25th Anniversary Album

BBC
AUDIO
Audio Tape - Doctor Who the 25th Anniversary Album
Audio Tape - Doctor Who the 25th Anniversary Album

BBC
AUDIO
Doctor Who the 25th Anniversary Album CD Cover
Doctor Who the 25th Anniversary Album CD Cover

BBC
AUDIO
Music From Doctor Who CD Cover
Music From Doctor Who CD Cover

Sanctury Records
AUDIO
   
Myths and Legends CD Cover
Myths and Legends CD Cover

Silva Screen
AUDIO
Sound Effects CD Cover
Sound Effects CD Cover

BBC
AUDIO
VHS Video Cover
VHS Video Cover

BBC
VIDEO
DVD Cover
DVD Cover

BBC
VIDEO
   
W.H. Smith VHS Video Cover
W.H. Smith VHS Video Cover

BBC
VIDEO
Evolution CD Cover
Evolution CD Cover

Prestige Records
AUDIO
W H Smith Dalek Box Set DVD Cover
W H Smith Dalek Box Set DVD Cover

BBC
VIDEO
Amazon Dalek Box Set DVD Cover
Amazon Dalek Box Set DVD Cover

BBC
VIDEO
   
DVD
DVD "O-ring" Cover

BBC
VIDEO
Davros Collection DVD Cover
Davros Collection DVD Cover

BBC
VIDEO
Special Edition DVD Cover
Special Edition DVD Cover

BBC
VIDEO
The 50th Anniversary Collection Cover
The 50th Anniversary Collection Cover

BBC
AUDIO
   



In Print

Target Book Cover
Target Book Cover

Target
NOVEL
50th Anniversary Edition Book Cover
50th Anniversary Edition Book Cover

BBC
NOVEL
Target Audio CD Cover
Target Audio CD Cover

BBC
CD
   


Magazines

Doctor Who CMS Magazine (In Vision): Issue 96
Doctor Who CMS Magazine (In Vision): Issue 96

CMS
Doctor Who Magazine - Preview: Issue 140
Doctor Who Magazine - Preview: Issue 140

Marvel Comics
Doctor Who Magazine - Article: Issue 299
Doctor Who Magazine - Article: Issue 299

Marvel Comics
Doctor Who Magazine - Time Team: Issue 406
Doctor Who Magazine - Time Team: Issue 406

Marvel Comics
   
Doctor Who Magazine - The Fact of Fiction: Issue 464
Doctor Who Magazine - The Fact of Fiction: Issue 464

Marvel Comics
Doctor Who Magazine Special - Archive: 1993 Summer Special
Doctor Who Magazine Special - Archive: 1993 Summer Special

Marvel Comics
Doctor Who DVD Files: Volume 29
Doctor Who DVD Files: Volume 29

GE Fabbri


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