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Colin Baker
Revelation of the Daleks
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Synopsis


Davros and a Dalek
Davros and a Dalek
 The Doctor and Peri arrive on Necros to attend the funeral of an old friend of The Doctor who has recently died. However, Tranquil Repose is not all it seems and an attempt is made on The Doctor's life.

 Soon The Doctor comes face to face with the Great Healer, only to discover it is none other than Davros, the creator of the Daleks, intent on rebuilding the Dalek race decimated by the Movellans.

Source: BBC DVD


General Information

Season: Twenty Two
Production Code: 6Z
Story Number: 142
Episode Numbers:638 - 639
Number of Episodes: 2
Percentage of Episodes Held:100%
Working Titles:"The End of the Road"
Production Dates: January - February 1985
Broadcast Started: 23 March 1985
Broadcast Finished: 30 March 1985
Colour Status: Colour
Studio: BBC Television Centre (TC1 and TC8)
Location: Hampshire: Bolinge Hill Farm (Buriton, Petersfield), Queen Elizabeth Country Park (Butser Hill and Gravel Hill, Horndean) and IBM North Harbour Building (Portsmouth).
West Sussex: Park Lane (Halnaker) and Tangmere Aerodrome (Tangmere).
Writer:Eric Saward
Director:Graeme Harper
Producer:John Nathan-Turner
Script Editor:Eric Saward
Editor:Ray Wingrove
Production Assistant:Elizabeth Sherry
Production Associate:Angela Smith
Assistant Floor Manager:Jo O'Leary
Designer:Alan Spalding
Costume Designer:Pat Godfrey
Make-Up Designer:Dorka Nieradzik
Cameraman:John Walker
Incidental Music:Roger Limb
Special Sounds (SFX Editor):Dick Mills
Studio Sounds:Andy Stacey
Lighting:Don Babbage
Visual Effects:John Brace
Title Sequence:Sid Sutton and Terry Handley
Title Music:Ron Grainer and the BBC Radiophonic Workshop. Arranged by Peter Howell
Daleks Originally Created By: Terry Nation
Number of Doctors: 1
The Doctor: Colin Baker (The Sixth Doctor)
Number of Companions: 1The Companion: Nicola Bryant (Peri) Guest Cast: Eleanor Bron (Kara), Alexei Sayle (D. J.), William Gaunt (Orcini), Clive Swift (Jobel) Additional Cast: Terry Molloy (Davros), John Ogwen (Bostock), Jenny Tomasin (Tasambeker), Stephen Flynn (Grigory), Bridget Lynch-Blosse (Natasha), Trevor Cooper (Takis), Colin Spaull (Lilt), Hugh Walters (Vogel), Alec Linstead (Head of Stengos), Ken Barker (Mutant), Roy Skelton (Dalek Voice), Royce Mills (Dalek Voice), John Scott Martin (Dalek Operator), Cy Town (Dalek Operator), Tony Starr (Dalek Operator), Toby Byrne (Dalek Operator), Penelope Lee (Computer Voice)Setting: Tranquil Repose, planet Necros Villains: Daleks, Daleks and Davros

The Episodes

No. Episodes Broadcast
(UK)
Duration Viewers
(Millions)
In Archive
638Part 123 March 198544'31"7.4PAL 1" colour videotape
639Part 230 March 198545'26"7.7PAL 1" colour videotape

Total Duration 1 Hour 30 Minutes


Audience Appreciation

Average Viewers (Millions) 7.6
Doctor Who Magazine Poll (1998)75.95%  (Position = 34 out of 159)
Doctor Who Magazine Poll (2003)705 Points (Position = 13 out of 159)
Doctor Who Magazine Poll (2009)78.59% Higher (Position = 46 out of 200)
Doctor Who Magazine Poll (2014)76.16% Lower (Position = 70 out of 241)


Archives


 Both episodes exist as PAL 1" colour videotapes. Also held in four 25-minute format episodes. A 71-edit scratch print of episode one also exists.



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Notes


"Revelation of the Daleks" was the sixth and final story of Season Twenty Two and is the Sixth Doctor’s first and only encounter with the Daleks. It also features, once again, the return of Davros.

Season Twenty Two had begun with a Cyberman story ("Attack of the Cybermen") that - for all intents and purposes - had been written by Script Editor Eric Saward. It was decided to end the season with another Eric Saward-scripted story, this time featuring the only monsters more popular than the Cybermen - the Daleks. For "Attack of the Cybermen" Eric Saward had managed to circumvent BBC rules, that stated that script editors were not allowed to commission themselves, by having his ex-girlfriend, Paula Wolsey, pose as that story’s writer. In the case of "Revelation of the Daleks" Eric Saward was able to receive a full credit by writing the scripts during a six-week gap before the renewal of his contract.

Eric Saward’s major source of inspiration for this story was Evelyn Waugh’s play "The Loved Ones", a black comedy whose characters included a piteous mortician named Joyboy and a woman who was secretly enamoured of him.

Several characters in Tranquil Repose were based directly upon names from Evelyn Waugh’s play. Joyboy gave rise to the similarly pathetic Jobel and his admirer became Tasambeker, named after a Greek saint to whom barren women prayed in the hope of conceiving a child.

The information text on the DVD release of this story states that "Soylent Green" was also an influence to this story and the synthesis of food protein from those Tranquil Repose clients, that Davros considers unworthy of becoming Daleks, is highly reminiscent of "Soylent Green". However, Eric Saward has said in the DVD commentary that he had not seen "Soylent Green" when he wrote this story.

Eric Saward was on holiday on Rhodes, when writing this story, and many of the names (such as Lilt and Orcini) come from places, products and people he encountered there.

The director assigned to this story was Graeme Harper, who had last worked on the 1984 Fifth Doctor story "The Caves of Androzani". This story though would be his last for the show. He had been scheduled to direct the aborted Thirtieth Anniversary story "The Dark Dimension" in 1993.

Portions of the story were filmed in the snow in locations near Portsmouth and Petersfield, in Hampshire. The main location used was the IBM UK headquarters in Cosham, Portsmouth. The company waived their usual fees in favour of the BBC making a donation to a local school.

This was the last Doctor Who story to be produced using a mixture of video (for interior studio scenes) and film (for exterior locations) - a practice that had been in place since the 1964 First Doctor story "The Reign of Terror" and in many other British television productions. Although it had been falling out of favour, since the start of the 1980s, it had continued to be used in Doctor Who up until this story. Discounting the 1996 film "Doctor Who: The Movie", it was not until the 2005 Ninth Doctor story "Rose" that a film-like look was once again applied to Doctor Who, although in fact when the show was revived in 2005 the show was recorded on standard-definition video and then film. Therefore "Revelation of the Daleks" remains the last Doctor Who story to use true film.

Unusually Colin Baker and Nicola Bryant appear entirely on film in the first episode and have no interaction with the other actors portrayed in the video segments.

The part of Davros was played by Terry Molloy. This was the first time that the actor to play this part was somebody who had previously appeared in the role. Terry Molloy had previously played the part in the 1984 Fifth Doctor story "Resurrection of the Daleks".

Actress Eleanor Bron, who played the part of Kara, was last seen in the show with John Cleese in their brief appearance as art enthusiasts in the 1979 Fourth Doctor story "City of Death".

Comedian Alexei Sayle (of The Young Ones) is seen playing the part of the semi-serious role of the DJ who broadcasts to the dead on Necros.

William Gaunt, who played the part of the mercenary Orcini, is better known for playing the part of Richard Barrett in the ITC series The Champions amongst many other notable roles.

Clive Swift, who played the part of Jobel, later returned to the show, as Mr. Copper, in the 2007 Tenth Doctor story "Voyage of the Damned".

This story contains clips from some classic rock tunes as part of the DJ’s programme. These include: "Good Vibrations" by the Beach Boys sound-alike The Surfers, "Whiter Shade of Pale" by Procul Harum, covers of Elvis Presley’s "Hound Dog" and "Blue Suede Shoes", "In The Mood" by the Ted Heath Orchestra, and "Fire" by the Jimi Hendrix Experience. Also heard, during the DJ’s broadcast, is "Moonlight Serenade" by Glenn Miller. The same song was also heard in the 2005 Ninth Doctor story "The Empty Child/The Doctor Dances".

During the studio recording of this story extra material was also recorded for the under-running second episode of the preceding story, "Timelash".

While climbing the wall with Peri, in the first episode, The Doctor is heard to state that he is a ‘900-year old Time Lord’. This is the first firm indication of The Doctor’s age since the Fourth Doctor’s era, suggesting that approximately 150 years has passed for The Doctor since that time. In the 2005 Ninth Doctor story "Aliens of London/World War Three" The Doctor would also claim to be 900 years old, despite the claiming an age of 953, in the 1987 Seventh Doctor story "Time and The Rani", which was then followed by the entire lifetime of both the Seventh Doctor and the Eighth Doctor.

After stating in "The Two Doctors" that he would become a vegetarian it seems that The Doctor is honouring this resolution as in this story he makes nut rolls for Peri.

In the first episode, when Peri exits the TARDIS, she makes a remark about her outfit being too tight, The Doctor then makes the untactful remark that she eats too much. If this was ever intended to be an ongoing issue with Peri, it was not mentioned again after this story.

This story contains one of the rare instances of The Doctor actually using a firearm. This is when he is seen to disable a Dalek by shooting it with a machine pistol.

The Doctor explains to Peri that if he took her to Earth after she had died, it would be possible for her to see her own gravestone. In the 1988 Seventh Doctor story "Silver Nemesis", Lady Peinforte shows her servant, Richard, his grave.

It is revealed that The Grand Order of Oberon is a group of religious knights which The Doctor can recognise a member of at a glance - perhaps because he has met them before in an untelevised story. The origins of The Grand Order of Oberon are explored further in Virgin Books’ The New Adventures novel "Lucifer Rising".

A transparent Dalek (frequently known as a Glass Dalek) appears for the first time. The use of a glass Dalek was something which had been devised for the first televised Dalek adventure - the 1963 First Doctor story "The Daleks" - but which had been omitted due to the prohibitive costs of such a prop.

In this story bastic bullets are used against the Daleks. In the 2005 Ninth Doctor story "Bad Wolf/The Parting of the Ways" bastic bullets are also used to repel the Daleks. But in this later story they are less effective then seen in this story.

Davros’ Daleks (which are white and gold) recognise The Doctor and it seems that Davros has been tracking him for some time. The Imperial Daleks (coloured grey) however, do not recognise The Doctor.

It is implied that the Imperial Daleks are still rebuilding after some military defeat, and, while known and still feared, they are not being actively aggressive towards humanity. Natasha recognises the Daleks on sight, and the President knows what they are.

Humans are aware of Davros and know what he (mostly) looks like. This enables Davros to construct a robotic head that the humans think is him.

Davros knows about regeneration having spent his time researching The Doctor, and already has ambitions to be Emperor. He came straight to Necros from his escape pod after the events of "Resurrection of the Daleks".

It is never explained how Davros survived the Movellan virus which he contracted at the end of "Resurrection of the Daleks". Although Davros says that he managed to escape the space station via an escape pod, no mention is made of his condition.

The Big Finish Productions audio story "Davros" also portrays another encounter between the Sixth Doctor and Davros, set between "Resurrection of the Daleks" and "Revelation of the Daleks", which goes some way to explain the inconsistencies between the two stories. In particular, The Doctor insists in "Revelation of the Daleks" that this is their first meeting since "Resurrection of the Daleks".

For the first time, Davros and the Daleks are seen to be able to hover some distance above the ground. In the transmitted version, the camera angles chosen didn't make it entirely clear that the Dalek was flying (some fans commenting that it looked more like the Dalek was giant-sized), so the sequence was remade for the DVD release of the story. All subsequent Dalek stories also feature levitation. The 1988 Seventh Doctor story "Remembrance of the Daleks" being the first to show a Dalek hovering up a flight of stairs.

It is revealed that Davros can now fire electric bolts from his hand, and has the ability to make a convincing robotic or cloned head of himself. His blood is green and at the end of this story his hand is shot off by Bostok. In the 2008 Tenth Doctor story "The Stolen Earth/Journey's End" this has been replaced with a robotic hand.

The idea of Davros creating a new race of Daleks using human tissue is similar to the Dalek Emperor creation of a new race of Daleks, from human contestants killed on the Game Station in "Bad Wolf/The Parting of the Ways".

Davros next appears (within his own continuity) in the Big Finish Productions audio story "The Juggernauts", however he next appears on screen in "Remembrance of the Daleks".

Eric Saward thought up the idea of blue ‘mourning’ suits for Necros in order to cover up the Sixth Doctor’s costume, which he considered inappropriate for the show.

The flowers of Necros are known as Herbabaculum vitae or weed plant.

This story contains a number of errors. Namely: Davros’ dialogue is often inaudible; when hovering a bit of the base of Davros’ chair is missing, leading to Orcini passing his leg through it; It is never explained why Davros lures The Doctor across the galaxy to drop a polystyrene statue full of fake blood onto him; Davros mentions turning The Doctor into a Dalek, but why not just capture him the instant he arrives?; When captured, how does The Doctor know that Davros is still alive? (Natasha and Grigory can’t possibly have told him, because they don't know either); Davros’ microphone is on his right-hand side in this story, the opposite compared to "Resurrection of the Daleks"; At the end of this story after The Doctor uses a gun, to destroy a Dalek, he checks for any more. However, even though one is clearly seen down the tunnel, The Doctor continues as if it wasn’t there. The grey Dalek that is destroyed in Davros’ laboratory clearly switches props from fully-functional Dalek to ‘stunt’ Dalek as it is exploded - the prop that is blown up has a lighter coloured mesh around its midsection than the fully functional Dalek.

This was the last Doctor Who story that Eric Saward was credited with writing.

This was the final story to use Peter Howell’s arrangement of the "Doctor Who Theme" that had been introduced in 1980.

This was the final story, of the original run of the show, to be broadcast in 45-minute episodes. This format would return 20 years later in the Ninth Doctor story "Rose", when the show was revived in 2005.

This story was first broadcast in the United States, Australia and New Zealand in four 25-minute episodes. The first cliffhanger sees Natasha and Grigory hiding in the catacombs as Takis and Lilt are wheeling a body through the tunnels, while the cliffhanger at the end of the third episode features either The Doctor telling Peri that she's' in great danger, or, in some edits of the story, Davros ordering his Daleks to kill the DJ. All VHS and DVD releases of the story have been in its original two-part form.

Following the broadcast of this story, the BBC decided to postpone the broadcast of the next season of Doctor Who. Although frequently called an ‘18-month hiatus’, the broadcast of the next story was only delayed by about nine months with the next new story airing in September 1986.

This story was originally to end with The Doctor saying to Peri the word ‘Blackpool as part of the line, ‘I know, I'll take you to...’. However, this was cut prior to transmission due to the cancellation of the original Twenty Third Season.

The following planned story, "The Nightmare Fair" that had been written by former producer Graham Williams, would have been set in Blackpool and feature the return of Michael Gough, as the Celestial Toymaker, who had last been seen in the 1966 First Doctor story "The Celestial Toymaker". In the wake of the cancellation of "The Nightmare Fair", and the whole of the planned Season Twenty Three, "Revelation of the Daleks" instead ended with The Doctor saying the letter ‘B’ and then a freeze frame.

The story was repeated on BBC 2 in March/April 1993 in its 4-part version to represent the Colin Baker years in a series of repeats featuring the original seven Doctors.

This is one of four of the televised Doctor Who stories that have never been novelised by Target Books. This is because they were unable to come to an agreement with Eric Saward and Daleks creator Terry Nation that would have allowed Eric Saward or another writer to adapt the script. Virgin Books (the successor to Target) did announce plans to publish a novelisation by Eric Saward in the early 1990s, but this ultimately did not occur. A fan group in New Zealand published an unofficial novelisation of this story that had been written by Jon Preddle. It was first released in 1992 with cover art by Warwick Gray and was then re-issued in 2000 with cover art by Alistair Hughes. It was later republished as an online eBook.



First and Last

The Firsts:

 The first, and only, story where the Sixth Doctor encounters the Daleks.

 The first time that Davros and the Daleks are seen to be able to hover some distance above the ground.

 The first time that the same actor played the part of Davros.


The Lasts (Subject to Future Stories):

 The last story of Season Twenty Two.

 The last Doctor Who story, of the original run of the show, to be broadcast in 45-minute episodes.

 The last Doctor Who story to use Peter Howell’s arrangement of the "Doctor Who Theme" that had been introduced in 1980.

 The last Doctor Who story to be produced using a mixture of video and film.

 The last Doctor Who story that Eric Saward was credited as writing.


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The Plot

WARNING: May Contain SpoilersHide Text
The TARDIS
The TARDIS

The TARDIS arrives on the icy surface of Necros, where The Doctor and Peri have come to attend the funeral of an old acquaintance of The Doctor’s, Professor Arthur Stengos. Stengos’ body is currently interred inside Tranquil Repose, a mortuary that provides an extra service - the cryogenic storage of the bodies of the galaxy’s wealthy, who are frozen until such time as medical science can cure whatever killed them.

However, almost immediately upon arrival, The Doctor and Peri are accosted by a hideously deformed man who attempts to kill The Doctor. When Peri hits him the man is suddenly freed of his mental conditioning. He forgives Peri and then dies. but not before mentioning the ‘Great Healer’ of Tranquil Repose. The Doctor tells Peri he is suspicious about reports of Stengos’ death, and the two head for the mortuary.

In reality, the Great Healer is none other than Davros, kept alive inside a cryogenic tank and served by Daleks who are the hidden security force of the mortuary. Davros contacts Kara, a wealthy factory operator who supplies foodstuffs for much of a hungry galaxy. Davros owns shares of Kara’s factory, among others, and demands more money to continue his hidden researches.

The Doctor
The Doctor

Inside Tranquil Repose, Mr. Jobel, the chief embalmer, resists the advances of the timid Tasambeker while preparing for the arrival of the President’s wife, who is ill with a dreadful disease. While Jobel plots to ensure that nothing goes wrong when the President’s spaceship arrives, two people arrive to retrieve the body of Stengos: Grigory, a medical scientist, and Natasha, Stengos’ daughter. What they find, instead, is a mannequin where Stengos’ body should be.

At Kara’s factory, her secretary Vogel announces the arrival of Orcini, a former member of the Knights of the Order of Oberon, now a paid assassin. Accompanied by his earthy squire, Bostock, Orcini learns of Kara’s target: Davros, who is bleeding her factory dry. Orcini is anxious to accept the challenge, seeing this as a final mission of honour to avenge any past misdoings on his conscience. Orcini and Bostock therefore head for the mortuary.

The Doctor and Peri
The Doctor and Peri

Deep in the mortuary’s lower levels, Grigory and Natasha locate Arthur Stengos. But they are shocked to discover him encased in a Dalek frame. Apparently, the Great Healer’s plans include turning occupants of the mortuary into Dalek beings. The two though are caught and interrogated by Jobel’s aides, Takis and Lilt.

The Doctor and Peri then arrive outside Tranquil Repose. But unbeknown to them their arrival is being watched by Davros. Then suddenly a large gravestone, on which is emblazoned The Doctor’s face, topples over and falls towards The Doctor, threatening to crush him. Peri is distraught that The Doctor has been killed but then has to resist the advances of Jobel who comes to her assistance. Luckily it turns out that the monument is a lightweight fake, and so The Doctor is unharmed.

On entering the mortuary Peri becomes intrigued by the centre’s DJ, whose American accent reminds her of home. The Doctor sends her off with Jobel to meet the DJ, who is employed to entertain and inform those who are interred in the cryogenic chambers. The Doctor meanwhile sets off, to meet the person who erected the statue, but is immediately stunned by the Daleks and is taken to the holding cell. There, he encounters Grigory and Natasha, who tells him of Stengos’ fate. The Doctor realises that Stengos’ death and the statue of himself were merely parts of a ruse to lure him here, and he has a good idea as to who is behind it. Suddenly, Orcini arrives and releases The Doctor and his party, though he warns The Doctor not to follow on his quest to kill Davros.

The Fake Davros
The Fake Davros

Davros summons Kara and has Vogel killed. Orcini and Bostock then arrive and attempt to defeat Davros, but discover that the countenance in the cryogenic chamber is merely a puppet... It is then revealed that Davros is alive and well in his mobile wheelchair. Bostock is killed and Orcini is captured. Meanwhile, the Daleks attempt to take over the mortuary. Peri and the DJ try to fend them off but the DJ unfortunately is killed. Meanwhile Tasambeker, who has been corrupted by Davros into hating Jobel, nevertheless attempts to warn him that he has displeased his Great Healer, but ends up killing him in cold blood when he spurns her. The Daleks then exterminate Tasambeker, aware of her betrayal. The Doctor, who has been captured again, is brought before Davros, who tells him that he is creating an army of Daleks, which are hidden in the catacombs underneath his laboratory. He has been using the inhabitants of the mortuary, with the remainder ending up as raw food material for the galaxy.

Daleks loyal to the Supreme Dalek then arrive from Skaro - having been summoned by Takis and Lilt, who are aware of Davros’ identity and renegade status. A battle between the Skaro Daleks and a group of Davros’ Daleks soon begins, while the inhabitants of the mortuary attempt to flee. The Skaro Daleks eventually win and arrest Davros and escort him back to their spaceship so that he can be taken to Skaro to stand trial. Davros tries to get the Daleks to take The Doctor as well, but they do not recognise him in this regeneration.

As Davros is taken away Takis and Lilt, now aware of their misjudgement, arrive with Peri. Orcini though wants to detonate a bomb he is carrying before the Dalek spaceship leaves. Refusing his offer to build a timer, The Doctor bids farewell to Orcini, then the group flees Davros’ chamber for the surface. Orcini then activates the bomb, which destroys him and the lower levels of Tranquil Repose. The Dalek spaceship though manages to take off before the blast. The Doctor though states that Orcini did die for something very honourable as he destroyed Davros's new generation of Daleks.

Aware that Tranquil Repose is now finished, The Doctor and Peri bid Takis and Lilt farewell, telling them and the other members of the mortuary staff that they should take up farming as the blue flowers that grow all over Necros can be used as a new food source to replace the product Davros had created from the dead bodies. As they leave Peri requests that The Doctor takes her somewhere nice for a holiday. The Doctor announces to Peri that he knows just the place...

 
The Glass Dalek
The Glass Dalek
Jobel
Jobel
Orcini, Bostock and Kara
Orcini, Bostock and Kara
The Supreme Daleks Arrive
The Supreme Daleks Arrive
 
The Doctor and Davros
The Doctor and Davros
The DJ
The DJ
Manning the Defences
Manning the Defences
Dalek vs Dalek
Dalek vs Dalek




Quote of the Story


 'I know somewhere that is truly tranquil... peaceful... restful... a panacea for the cares of mind.'

The Doctor



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Release Information

FormatTitleRelease Date (UK)Code NumberCover ArtRemarks
Video
VHS
Revelation of the DaleksNovember 1999BBCV 6927Photo-montagePart of a Limited Edition Dalek Box Set (BBCV 6875) along with "Planet of the Daleks"
Video
VHS
Revelation of the DaleksSeptember 2001BBCV 7254Photo-montageRemastered version Part of the "The Davros Collection Boxed Set" released by WH Smith
Video
DVD
Revelation of the DaleksJuly 2005BBCDVD 1357Clayton HickmanIncludes an option to view this story with CGI enhanced special effects sequences
Video
DVD
Revelation of the DaleksJanuary 2007BBCDVD 2261Part of "The Dalek" Box Set containing 5 Dalek stories Exclusive to Amazon
Video
DVD
Revelation of the DaleksJuly 2007BBCDVD 2475 2475Clayton HickmanRe-released with a special "O-ring" slipcover
Video
DVD
Revelation of the DaleksNovember 2007BBCDVD 2508Photo-montagePart of the "The Davros Collection" Box Set containing 5 Davros stories
Audio
CD
The 50th Anniversary CollectionDecember 2013Photo-montageOriginal Television Soundtracks


In Print

FormatTitleRelease Date (UK)PublisherAuthorCover ArtRemarks
Novel
Novel
Revelation of the DaleksNovember 2019BBC BooksEric SawardHardback. ISBN: 978-1-78594-435-2
CD
CD
Revelation of the DaleksJanuary 2020BBC AudioEric SawardAudio version of the BBC Novel
Novel
Novel
Revelation of the DaleksMarch 2021BBC BooksEric SawardTarget Collection Paperback. ISBN: 978-1-78594-436-9
Doctor Who CMS Magazine (In Vision)Issue 84 (Released: May 1999)
Doctor Who Magazine - PreviewIssue 98 (Released: March 1985)
Doctor Who Magazine - ArchiveIssue 188 (Released: July 1992)
Doctor Who Magazine - After ImageIssue 201 (Released: July 1993)
Doctor Who Magazine - The Fact of FictionIssue 359 (Released: August 2005)
Doctor Who Magazine - Time TeamIssue 396 (Released: June 2008)
Doctor Who DVD FilesVolume 38 (Released: June 2010)

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Photo Gallery


The Doctor and Companion

 
Colin Baker
The Sixth Doctor

   

 
Nicola Bryant
Peri
 
   




On Release

Dalek Tin Box Set
Dalek Tin Box Set

BBC
VIDEO
W.H. Smith VHS Video Cover
W.H. Smith VHS Video Cover

BBC
VIDEO
DVD Cover
DVD Cover

BBC
VIDEO
Amazon Dalek Box Set DVD Cover
Amazon Dalek Box Set DVD Cover

BBC
VIDEO
   
DVD
DVD "O-ring" Cover

BBC
VIDEO
Davros Collection DVD Cover
Davros Collection DVD Cover

BBC
VIDEO
The 50th Anniversary Collection Cover
The 50th Anniversary Collection Cover

BBC
AUDIO



In Print

BBC Books Hardback Cover
BBC Books Hardback Cover

BBC
NOVEL
Audio CD Cover
Audio CD Cover

BBC
CD
BBC Books Target Collection Cover
BBC Books Target Collection Cover

BBC
NOVEL
   


Magazines

Doctor Who CMS Magazine (In Vision): Issue 84
Doctor Who CMS Magazine (In Vision): Issue 84

CMS
Doctor Who Magazine - Preview: Issue 98
Doctor Who Magazine - Preview: Issue 98

Marvel Comics
Doctor Who Magazine - Archive: Issue 188
Doctor Who Magazine - Archive: Issue 188

Marvel Comics
Doctor Who Magazine - After Image: Issue 201
Doctor Who Magazine - After Image: Issue 201

Marvel Comics
   
Doctor Who Magazine - The Fact of Fiction: Issue 359
Doctor Who Magazine - The Fact of Fiction: Issue 359

Marvel Comics
Doctor Who Magazine - Time Team: Issue 396
Doctor Who Magazine - Time Team: Issue 396

Marvel Comics
Doctor Who DVD Files: Volume 38
Doctor Who DVD Files: Volume 38

GE Fabbri


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