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Patrick Troughton
The Evil of the Daleks
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Synopsis


The Evil of the Daleks
The Evil of the Daleks
 The TARDIS has been stolen from Gatwick Airport, and The Doctor and Jamie are hot on its trail. A series of cryptic clues lead them to an antiques shop owned by Edward Waterfield, and there it becomes clear that an elaborate trap has been laid for them - but by whom, and for what purpose? Only a journey back in time to the 1860s will reveal the answer…

 The Daleks are in search of the Human Factor, something which they believe will help their quest for universal domination. In order to achieve their aim they need The Doctor’s help - and the use of his TARDIS. Worried that his old friend may be turning traitor, Jamie discovers that he too is part of the plan - in the course of which he encounters Victoria Waterfield, a young woman who is to play a large part in his and The Doctor’s life.

 The Daleks’ plan has far-reaching consequences, leading to conflict and destruction of astonishing proportions. And when the TARDIS arrives on the battlefield planet of Skaro, the scene is set for an encounter between The Doctor and the malevolent Emperor Dalek...

Source: BBC Audio


General Information

Season: Four
Production Code: LL
Story Number: 36
Episode Numbers:163 - 169
Number of Episodes: 7
Number of Incomplete/Missing Episodes:6
Percentage of Episodes Held:14%
Working Titles:"The Daleks"
Production Dates: April - June 1967
Broadcast Started: 20 May 1967
Broadcast Finished: 01 July 1967
Colour Status: B&W
Studio: Ealing Television Film Studios and Lime Grove (Studio D)
Location: Grim's Dyke Mansion House (Harrow Weald, Middlesex), Kendal Avenue (Ealing) and Warehouse Lane (Shepherd's Bush, London).
Writer:David Whitaker
Directors:Derek Martinus and Timothy Combe
Producer:Innes Lloyd
Associate Producer:Peter Bryant
Story Editors:Gerry Davis (Episodes 1-3) and Peter Bryant (Episodes 4-7)
Editor:Ted Walters
Production Assistant:Timothy Combe
Assistant Floor Managers:David Tilley and Margaret Rushton
Designer:Chris Thompson
Costume Designer:Sandra Reid
Make-Up Designer:Gillian James
Cameraman:John Baker
Incidental Music:Dudley Simpson
Special Sounds (SFX Editor):Brian Hodgson
Studio Sounds:Bryan Forgham
Lighting:Wally Whitmore
Visual Effects:Michealjohn Harris and Peter Day
Fights Arranged By:Peter Diamond
Title Sequence:Bernard Lodge
Title Music:Ron Grainer and the BBC Radiophonic Workshop. Arranged by Delia Derbyshire
Dalek Fight Sequence Directed By: Timothy Combe
Daleks Originally Created By: Terry Nation
Number of Doctors: 1
The Doctor: Patrick Troughton (The Second Doctor)
Number of Companions: 2The Companions: Frazer Hines (Jamie McCrimmon) and Deborah Watling (Victoria Waterfield) (Joins) Guest Cast: Windsor Davies (Toby) Additional Cast: John Bailey (Edward Waterfield), Marius Goring (Theodore Maxtible), Brigit Forsyth (Ruth Maxtible), Alec Ross (Bob Hall), Griffith Davies (Kennedy), Geoffrey Colville (Perry), Robert Jewell (Dalek), Gerald Taylor (Dalek), John Scott Martin (Dalek), Murphy Grumbar (Dalek), Ken Tyllsen (Dalek), Roy Skelton (Dalek Voice), Peter Hawkins (Dalek Voice), Jo Rowbottom (Mollie Dawson), Gary Watson (Arthur Terrall), Sonny Caldinez (Kemel)Setting: England (1966), England (1866) and Skaro Villain: Daleks

The Episodes

No. Episodes Broadcast
(UK)
Duration Viewers
(Millions)
In Archive
163Episode 120 May 196724'07"8.1Missing
164Episode 227 May 196725'13"7.516mm telerecording
165Episode 303 June 196724'27"6.1Missing
166Episode 410 June 196724'43"5.3Missing
167Episode 517 June 196725'23"5.1Missing
168Episode 624 June 196724'48"6.8Missing
169Episode 701 July 196724'33"6.1Missing

Total Duration 2 Hours 53 Minutes


Audience Appreciation

Average Viewers (Millions) 6.4
Doctor Who Magazine Poll (1998)84.22%  (Position = 9 out of 159)
Doctor Who Magazine Poll (2003)420 Points (Position = 36 out of 159)
Doctor Who Magazine Poll (2009)83.74% Lower (Position = 18 out of 200)
Doctor Who Magazine Poll (2014)82.46% Lower (Position = 34 out of 241)


Archives


 Only episode 2 exists as 16mm telerecording. All other episodes are lost. Telesnaps (off-air camera photographs) from this story exist. A three-second film clip also exists from episode 7.



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Notes


This story is considered to be one of the finest stories of its era and introduces Deborah Watling as new companion Victoria Waterfield (though Deborah Watling was not the first choice to play the character; actress Denise Buckley was originally cast, but then dropped). The 20th May 1967 marked Deborah Watling's debut in the show.

Polly Wright and Ben Jackson (who had left the show at the end of the previous story "The Faceless Ones") were in the original drafts of episodes one and two. The scripts had to be rewritten to accommodate their departure.

Both Patrick Troughton and Deborah Watling were on holiday during the recording of episode four and so appear only in pre-filmed inserts.

The actor who would give Alpha, Beta and Omega their voices, Roy Skelton, would later go on to be the voice of Zippy and George on the 1970s ITV children's show Rainbow.

John Bailey, who played Edward Waterfield, had previously appeared in the 1964 First Doctor story "The Sensorites", and would later appear in the 1979/80 Fourth Doctor story "The Horns of Nimon". This story also features the guest appearance by Windsor Davies (playing the part of Toby) who is more famous for his role as Battery Sergeant-Major Williams in the comedy show It Ain't Half Hot Mum.

This story was initially intended to be the last Dalek story on Doctor Who. Writer Terry Nation, the creator of the Daleks, was busily trying to sell the Daleks to the United States at the time and it was intended to give them a big send-off from the show. However, this was not to be The Doctor’s last encounter with them in the show as they would later return in the 1972 Third Doctor story "Day of the Daleks" during Season Nine and then subsequent seasons. As with the earlier "The Power of the Daleks", Terry Nation receives a screen credit for his creations.

Even though episodes stopped having individual titles as of the 1966 First Doctor story "The Savages" all episodes except part 6 had individual episode titles on the scripts: "To Set a Trap" (1), "The Net Tightens" (2), "A Trial of Strength" (3), "A Test of Skill" (4), "The Human Factor" (5) and "The End of the Daleks" (7).

For the dating of this story the first two episodes take place immediately after the final episode of the First Doctor story "The War Machines"; coincidentally, the First Doctor said that he had the same feeling he had when Daleks were around at the start of that story.

Fans have suggested that this story is the final Dalek story in the context of the Dalek’s history, though as with much in Doctor Who fandom, this is debatable. The FASA Doctor Who Role Playing Game supported this view, placing the story's date 143,350 years in the future of Gallifrey's present. A scene cut from the script of the 1972 Third Doctor story "Day of the Daleks" would have stated that the rebellious Daleks of this story were destroyed, however, establishing that "Evil of the Daleks" is not the very last Dalek story.

The story of the humanised Daleks was followed up in issues 312 - 317 of the Doctor Who Magazine comic strip story "Children of the Revolution", featuring the Eighth Doctor and his companion Izzy. This contradicted an earlier comic strip ("Bringer of Darkness" in the Doctor Who Magazine Dalek Special), that took place after the events of "Evil of the Daleks". In this story, a group of marooned Daleks inform The Doctor that the rebel factions were destroyed and the Emperor again reigned supreme.

This is not the only story where Daleks are ‘humanised’. In the 2005 Ninth Doctor story "Dalek" a lone Dalek assimilates Rose Tyler's DNA. Like the Daleks in this story, this Dalek begins experiencing emotions like fear and empathy, and subsequently questions the instinctive Dalek xenophobia. Human Daleks are also seen in the 2007 Tenth Doctor story "Daleks in Manhattan/Evolution of the Daleks".

The Daleks in this story are controlled by an Emperor. Other versions of a Dalek Emperor would appear in the 1988 Seventh Doctor story "Remembrance of the Daleks" and the 2005 Ninth Doctor story "Bad Wolf/The Parting of the Ways".

The Doctor's journey to Skaro (via the time cabinet) is the first time The Doctor returns to an alien planet visited in a previous story (although scenes on Skaro were featured in "The Space Museum" and "The Chase"). It was not until "The Monster of Peladon" that the TARDIS itself would revisit a world it had previously landed on.

Episode seven of this story is the first time that The Doctor admits to being other than human.

Despite HADS (used by the TARDIS in the Season Six story "The Krotons") The Doctor seems to believe that the Daleks could destroy the TARDIS.

The Beatles' "Paperback Writer" and the Seekers' "Nobody Knows the Trouble I've Seen" are used as background music on the juke box in the coffee bar scenes in the first episode.

The theme given to the Daleks by Dudley Simpson in his incidental music was based on the show's own signature tune. Also sound effects from the First Doctor stories "The Daleks" and "The Daleks' Master Plan" are reused for the Dalek city.

Some Louis Marx 'tricky action' toy Daleks were used for the scenes of the massed Dalek battle and the subsequent destruction of the Dalek’ city at the end of episode seven. Unfortunately the use of these toys could not be disguised.

The venue for most of the location filming was Grim's Dyke Mansion House at Harrow Weald, Middlesex. At the time a rehabilitation centre, Grim's Dyke had once been the home of Sir William Gilbert, one half of the famous playwright team of Gilbert and Sullivan. Director Derek Martinus used the building itself to stand in for Maxtible's mansion, and also set some of the 1966 scenes on its grounds. Unusually, recording at Grim's Dyke on the 24th April 1967 involved night filming for the fight scene between Jamie McCrimmon and Kemel.

The first individual visual effects designer credits ever given on Doctor Who appears, for Michealjohn Harris and Peter Day. Previously, visual effects had been handled by the show's scenic designers rather than by the BBC's Visual Effects Department, although the department as a whole did receive a credit on the first story, "An Unearthly Child"). Interestingly Michealjohn Harris is the person whose name is most often misspelt on Doctor Who's closing credits.

"The Evil of the Daleks" was the final Doctor Who story on which Gerry Davis was credited as Story Editor (he departed after episode three). With Producer Innes Lloyd also preparing to move on, Gerry Davis had been offered the post of producer but declined, and so his assistant, Peter Bryant, was being groomed for the top job. It was originally planned that Peter Bryant would serve as an Associate Producer on "The Evil of the Daleks", as he had on "The Faceless Ones", but it was later agreed that he would officially succeed Gerry Davis as of episode four. Victor Pemberton, who had appeared on screen in "The Moonbase", was brought in to assist Peter Bryant.

Gerry Davis would continue to work as a scriptwriter and story editor, creating the cautionary series Doomwatch with Kit Pedler. He also contributed two further Doctor Who stories: "The Tomb of the Cybermen" (co-written with Kit Pedler), which immediately followed "The Evil of the Daleks" into production, and the 1975 Fourth Doctor story "Revenge of the Cybermen". Beginning in the seventies, Gerry Davis started working in the United States, writing for programmes such as The Bionic Woman and Captain Power and The Soldiers of the Future, as well as the feature film The Final Countdown.

With the completion of this story the Doctor Who team had finally escaped the spectre of making each episode just a week ahead of broadcast as had been the case since "The Underwater Menace" in January - a perilous situation which, thanks to the skill of those involved, did not effect the broadcasting of each episode.

This story is the only Doctor Who story to be repeated in the context of the show. The 1968 Season Five story, "The Wheel in Space", ended with The Doctor using a telepathic display machine to show new companion Zoe Heriot the sort of monsters she would face if she joined the TARDIS crew. A clip from the end of episode one of "The Evil of the Daleks" is used. (Ironically, Zoe herself would never encounter the Daleks on television).

Over the following weeks (bridging the gap between Season Five and Season Six) the entire story was then shown, with a narration over the opening scene of episode 1 as a means of reminding viewers of the reason for the repeat. This was the only time any Doctor Who episodes (other than the first episode) were re-shown in the 1960s. The repeat showing of this story garnered the following ratings (in millions): 6.3 (1), 5.0 (2), 6.3 (3), 5.0 (4), 5.1 (5), 4.2 (6) and 5.5 (7).

Unfortunately only the second episode currently exists in the BBC Archives. All seven episodes were lost in the BBC's stock clearance of the 1970s and so all seven episodes were reported missing from the BBC Film and Videotape Library following an audit in 1978. However, the second episode was returned, in May 1987, by a private collector thanks to a telerecording found at a car boot sale.

In 2004, analysis of the repeated clip used in "The Wheel in Space" episode six revealed it to be from episode one rather than episode two, as had been long believed. This, however, only constitutes a few frames of recovered footage.

The discovery of a behind-the-scenes film, The Last Dalek, made by the special effects team as they worked on the story's conclusion, facilitated a recreation of the climactic battle scenes. This recreation, along with the entire film, have been made available in different forms on various Patrick Troughton releases.

In 1993, readers of DreamWatch Bulletin voted this story as the best ever Doctor Who story in a special poll for the show's thirtieth anniversary.



First and Last

The Firsts:

 The introduction of new companion Victoria played by Deborah Watling.

 The first appearance of the Dalek Emperor.

 Peter Bryant's first involvement in the show as Story Editor.

 The first Doctor Who story to be directed by Derek Martinus and Timothy Combe.

 Peter Day's first involvement in the show as Effects Designer.


The Lasts (Subject to Future Stories):

 The last story of Season Four.

 Gerry Davis's last involvement in the show as Story Editor.

 Peter Bryant's last involvement in the show as Associate Producer.

 The last appearance of the Daleks until the 1972 story "Day of the Daleks".


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The Plot

WARNING: May Contain SpoilersHide Text
Chasing After the TARDIS
Chasing After the TARDIS

After saying their goodbyes to Polly Wright and Ben Jackson in 1966, The Doctor and Jamie McCrimmon watch helplessly as a lorry, with the TARDIS onboard, being driven away from Gatwick Airport. They question the hangar foreman. But The Doctor grows suspicious of him and decides to follow him when he leaves. This eventually leads them to an antique shop run by Edward Waterfield. The Doctor instantly realises that there is something very odd about the shop as it seems to sell Victorian antiques that look very much as if they were brand new.

What The Doctor does not realise is that Edward Waterfield is being coerced by the Daleks – one of which materialises in a secret room at the back of the shop through a time machine, and exterminates an employee called Kennedy. Investigating the back of the shop, The Doctor and Jamie discover Kennedy’s body but they trigger a booby trap and gas pours into the room. Edward Waterfield then appears and drags the unconscious Doctor and Jamie into the time machine.

They wake up to find that they have been transported back 100 years to 1866, and are in the house of Theodore Maxtible, Edward Waterfield's partner. The Doctor learns that the two had been trying to invent a time machine using mirrors and static electricity. Then the Daleks emerged from their time cabinet and took Edward Waterfield's daughter, Victoria Waterfield, hostage and forced Edward Waterfield to travel a century forward in time to lure The Doctor into a trap by stealing the TARDIS. Edward Waterfield is obviously fearful for his daughter's safety and his own, but Theodore Maxtible seems to be going along with the Daleks for his own reasons.

A Dalek Materilises
A Dalek Materilises

The Daleks then threaten to destroy the TARDIS unless The Doctor helps them to conduct an experiment so as to isolate the ‘Human Factor’, the unique qualities of human beings that have allowed them to consistently resist and defeat the Daleks. Once The Doctor has isolated the Human Factor they plan to implant it into three Daleks, which will then become the precursors of a race of ‘super’ Daleks, with the best qualities of humans and Daleks. To that end, the Daleks get The Doctor to test Jamie by sending him to rescue Victoria, who is being kept captive in the house. The Doctor is strangely co-operative with the Daleks, manipulating Jamie into the rescue mission but not telling him the nature of the test nor the dangers he will confront.

Jamie manages to rescue Victoria, but she is taken prisoner again and transported through the time cabinet. The Doctor, observing how Jamie accomplished the rescue, distils the Human Factor, but continues to harbour suspicions that there is more to the experiment than just this. Once the Human Factor is implanted in the three Daleks, they become completely human in personality and seem almost child-like, although The Doctor realises their mentalities will mature quickly. The Doctor's decides to christen the three Daleks ‘Alpha’, ‘Beta’ and ‘Omega’. However, despite being ‘human’ Daleks they still follow Dalek orders and return through the time cabinet to Skaro, the Daleks' home planet.

The Doctor and Jamie
The Doctor and Jamie

Meanwhile, Edward Waterfield has discovered that Theodore Maxtible has betrayed them all to the Daleks, hoping that he will be able to learn the secret of transforming base metal into gold. However, Theodore Maxtible, who has travelled to Skaro through the mirror cabinet, is discovering just how ruthless the Daleks are and how empty their promises can be. Back on Earth The Doctor, Jamie and Edward Waterfield find themselves locked out of the time cabinet, but they manage to use the Daleks' own short-range time machine to make the journey to Skaro just before a Dalek bomb destroys Theodore Maxtible's house.

The trio find their way into the Dalek city and are brought before the imposing Dalek Emperor, who reveals the true reason behind the experiments and the capture of the TARDIS. By isolating the human factor, The Doctor more importantly has succeeded in isolating the ‘Dalek Factor’ - the qualities that make the Daleks mindless killing machines. In addition, the Emperor intends to use the TARDIS to spread the Dalek Factor throughout human history, turning all humanity into Daleks.

Meanwhile, after being shown a machine that can turn base metal into gold, Theodore Maxtible is tricked into walking through an archway that instead infuses him with the Dalek Factor, mentally turning him into a Dalek. The Doctor is also lured through the archway, apparently converting him. However, The Doctor feigns his conversion, and instead secretly plants a device on the archway.

Victoria is Held Captive
Victoria is Held Captive

As the Daleks are hunting for the three ‘human’ Daleks, who are have been heard to question orders, The Doctor suggests that all the Daleks should pass through the conversion archway so that the ‘human’ Daleks will once again be infused with the Dalek Factor.

As the first batch of Daleks goes through the archway, The Doctor is able to free the others and to explain to them that the archway could not affect him as it was calibrated for humans and as he is not one it won’t affect him. He also reveals that he has swapped the Dalek Factor for the Human Factor so that when the Daleks pass through the archway they will all be converted to become ‘human’ Daleks and so start to question the Emperor’s orders. He then tells his friends to escape to the surface.

As the converted Daleks spread through the city civil war breaks out as they battle with the Emperor's Black Daleks. During the battle Edward Waterfield sees an enemy Dalek approaching and fire at The Doctor. He shields The Doctor but in doing so receives a fatal wound. Before he dies he asks The Doctor to take care of his daughter.

With the battle between the two Dalek factions intensifying the converted Daleks eventually reach the Emperor where he is attacked and exterminated thus causing a huge explosion to rip through the Dalek’s city. The Doctor though is able to reach the surface and meet up with Jamie and Victoria. It is then that he breaks the news of Edward Waterfield's death. He tells Victoria that her father’s death was not in vain as he believes that this is the final end of the Daleks. The Doctor then announces to Jamie that Victoria will be joining them and so they all head for the TARDIS and safety.

 
A Dalek With Edward Waterfield
A Dalek With Edward Waterfield
Theodore Maxtible
Theodore Maxtible
Victoria is Helped by Kemel
Victoria is Helped by Kemel
Theodore Maxtible with a Dalek
Theodore Maxtible with a Dalek
 
Jamie and Kemel
Jamie and Kemel
A Scared Victoria
A Scared Victoria
The Emperor Dalek
The Emperor Dalek
The Daleks are Destroyed
The Daleks are Destroyed




Quote of the Story


 'There is only one form of life that matters - Dalek life!'

A Dalek



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Release Information

FormatTitleRelease Date (UK)Code NumberCover ArtRemarks
Audio
Tape
The Missing Stories - The Evil of the Daleks1992ZBBC 1303Photo-montageNarrated by Tom Baker Edited Version Double Cassette
Video
VHS
Daleks: The Early YearsJuly 1992BBCV 4810PhotoEpisode 2 only Introduced by Peter Davison
Audio
CD
30 Years at the Radiophonic Workshop1993BBC CD 871Photo-montageSound effects
Video
VHS
The Missing YearsNovember 1998BBCV 6766Photo-montageA 56 minute documentary presented by Frazer Hines (Jamie McCrimmon) and Deborah Watling (Victoria Waterfield) Includes existing footage from episodes 2 and 7 Released as part of The Ice Warriors Collection (BBCV 6387)
Audio
CD
Doctor Who: DaleksNovember 2003Narrated by Frazer Hines (Jamie McCrimmon) Triple CD release Released as part of the "Doctor Who: Daleks" collector's tin along with "The Power of the Daleks" and a bonus disc featuring "My Life as a Dalek" - a story Mark Gatiss discussing the history of the Daleks
Audio
CD
The Evil of the DaleksAugust 2004Narrated by Frazer Hines (Jamie McCrimmon) Triple CD Release
Video
DVD
Doctor Who: Lost in TimeNovember 2004BBCDVD 1353Photo-montageEpisode 2 The documentary "The Last Dalek" featuring footage taking during the model photography of this story, is reused (it originally appeared on the DVD release of "The Seeds of Death")
Audio
CD
The Evil of the DaleksFebruary 2012Photo-montagePart of the "Doctor Who: The Lost TV Episodes: Collection Four 1967" Box Set Narrated by Frazer Hines (Jamie McCrimmon)
Audio
LP
The Evil of the DaleksJuly 2019Photo-montageLimited Edition Double LP - Narrated by Frazer Hines (Jamie McCrimmon). 2 versions released - an Exclusive Edition of 1000 and a Deluxe Edition of 500,
Video
DVD
The Evil of the DaleksSeptember 2021BBCDVD 4473Photo-montageDVD containing black & white and colour versions of the animated episodes.
Video
Blu-Ray
The Evil of the DaleksSeptember 2021BBCBD 0531Photo-montageBlu-Ray containing black & white and colour versions of the animated episodes.
Video
Blu-Ray
The Evil of the DaleksSeptember 2021BBCBD 0532Photo-montageLimited Edition Blu-Ray Steelbook boxed set containing black & white and colour versions of the animated episodes.


In Print

FormatTitleRelease Date (UK)PublisherAuthorCover ArtRemarks
Novel
Novel
The Evil of the DaleksAugust 1993Virgin (Target) No. 155John PeelAlister PearsonISBN: 0-426-20389-5
Doctor Who CMS Magazine (An Adventure in Space and Time)Issue 36
Doctor Who Magazine - NostalgiaIssue 128 (Released: September 1987)
Doctor Who Magazine - ArchiveIssue 200 (Released: June 1993)
Doctor Who Magazine - Telesnap ArchiveIssue 237 (Released: April 1996)
Doctor Who Magazine - Telesnap ArchiveIssue 238 (Released: May 1996)
Doctor Who Magazine - Telesnap ArchiveIssue 239 (Released: June 1996)
Doctor Who Magazine - Telesnap ArchiveIssue 240 (Released: July 1996)
Doctor Who Magazine - Telesnap ArchiveIssue 241 (Released: July 1996)
Doctor Who Magazine - Telesnap ArchiveIssue 242 (Released: August 1996)
Doctor Who Magazine - Telesnap ArchiveIssue 243 (Released: September 1996)
Doctor Who Magazine - Time TeamIssue 302 (Released: April 2001)
Doctor Who Magazine - Time TeamIssue 303 (Released: May 2001)
Doctor Who Magazine - The Fact of FictionIssue 342 (Released: April 2004)
Doctor Who Magazine - Missing In ActionIssue 498 (Released: May 2016)
Doctor Who Magazine Special - Archive1981 Winter Special (Released: 1981)

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Photo Gallery


The Doctor and Companions

 
Patrick Troughton
The Second Doctor

   

Frazer Hines
Jamie McCrimmon
 
Deborah Watling
Victoria Waterfield
   




On Release

The Missing Stories Tape Cover
The Missing Stories Tape Cover

BBC
AUDIO
Daleks: The Early Years VHS Video Cover
Daleks: The Early Years VHS Video Cover

BBC
VIDEO
Sound Effects CD Cover
Sound Effects CD Cover

BBC
AUDIO
Missing Years VHS Video Cover
Missing Years VHS Video Cover

BBC
VIDEO
   
Doctor Who: Daleks Tin
Doctor Who: Daleks Tin

BBC
AUDIO
Soundtrack CD Cover
Soundtrack CD Cover

BBC
AUDIO
Lost In Time DVD Cover
Lost In Time DVD Cover

BBC
VIDEO
The Lost TV Episodes: Collection Four CD Cover
The Lost TV Episodes: Collection Four CD Cover

BBC
AUDIO
   
Original Television Soundtrack LP Cover
Original Television Soundtrack LP Cover

Demon Records
AUDIO
DVD Cover
DVD Cover

BBC
VIDEO
Blu-Ray Cover
Blu-Ray Cover

BBC
VIDEO
Blu-Ray Steelbook Cover
Blu-Ray Steelbook Cover

BBC
VIDEO
   



In Print

 
Virgin Book Cover
Virgin Book Cover

Virgin
NOVEL
 
   


Magazines

Doctor Who CMS Magazine (An Adventure in Space and Time): Issue 36
Doctor Who CMS Magazine (An Adventure in Space and Time): Issue 36

CMS
Doctor Who Magazine - Nostalgia: Issue 128
Doctor Who Magazine - Nostalgia: Issue 128

Marvel Comics
Doctor Who Magazine - Archive: Issue 200
Doctor Who Magazine - Archive: Issue 200

Marvel Comics
Doctor Who Magazine - Telesnap Archive: Issue 237
Doctor Who Magazine - Telesnap Archive: Issue 237

Marvel Comics
   
Doctor Who Magazine - Telesnap Archive: Issue 238
Doctor Who Magazine - Telesnap Archive: Issue 238

Marvel Comics
Doctor Who Magazine - Telesnap Archive: Issue 239
Doctor Who Magazine - Telesnap Archive: Issue 239

Marvel Comics
Doctor Who Magazine - Telesnap Archive: Issue 240
Doctor Who Magazine - Telesnap Archive: Issue 240

Marvel Comics
Doctor Who Magazine - Telesnap Archive: Issue 241
Doctor Who Magazine - Telesnap Archive: Issue 241

Marvel Comics
   
Doctor Who Magazine - Telesnap Archive: Issue 242
Doctor Who Magazine - Telesnap Archive: Issue 242

Marvel Comics
Doctor Who Magazine - Telesnap Archive: Issue 243
Doctor Who Magazine - Telesnap Archive: Issue 243

Marvel Comics
Doctor Who Magazine - Time Team: Issue 302
Doctor Who Magazine - Time Team: Issue 302

Marvel Comics
Doctor Who Magazine - Time Team: Issue 303
Doctor Who Magazine - Time Team: Issue 303

Marvel Comics
   
Doctor Who Magazine - The Fact of Fiction: Issue 342
Doctor Who Magazine - The Fact of Fiction: Issue 342

Marvel Comics
Doctor Who Magazine - Missing In Action: Issue 498
Doctor Who Magazine - Missing In Action: Issue 498

Marvel Comics
Doctor Who Magazine Special - Archive: 1981 Winter Special
Doctor Who Magazine Special - Archive: 1981 Winter Special

Marvel Comics


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