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Tom Baker
The Deadly Assassin
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Synopsis


Danger in the Matrix
Danger in the Matrix
 Gallifrey. Planet of the Time Lords. The Doctor has finally come home, but not by choice.

 Summoned by a vision from The Matrix, he is drawn into web of political intrigue and assassination. Nothing is quite what it seems, and in the shadows lurks his oldest and deadliest enemy…

Source: BBC VHS Video


General Information

Season: Fourteen
Production Code: 4P
Story Number: 88
Episode Numbers:436 - 439
Number of Episodes: 4
Percentage of Episodes Held:100%
Working Titles:"The Dangerous Assassin"
Production Dates: July - September 1976
Broadcast Started: 30 October 1976
Broadcast Finished: 20 November 1976
Colour Status: Colour
Studio: BBC Television Centre (TC3 and TC8)
Location: Betchworth Quarry (Betchworth, Surrey), Royal Alexandra and Albert School (Merstham, Surrey) and Wycombe Air Park (High Wycombe, Buckinghamshire).
Writer:Robert Holmes
Director:David Maloney
Producer:Philip Hinchcliffe
Script Editor:Robert Holmes (Uncredited)
Editor:Ian McKendrick
Production Assistant:Nicholas John
Production Unit Manager:Chris D'Oyly-John
Assistant Floor Manager:Linda Graeme
Designer:Roger Murray-Leach
Costume Designers:James Acheson and Joan Ellacott
Make-Up Designer:Jean Williams
Cameraman:Fred Hamilton
Incidental Music:Dudley Simpson
Special Sounds (SFX Editor):Dick Mills
Studio Sounds:Clive Gifford
Lighting:Brian Clemett
Visual Effects:Len Hutton and Peter Day
Fights Arranged By:Terry Walsh
Title Sequence:Bernard Lodge
Title Music:Ron Grainer and the BBC Radiophonic Workshop. Arranged by Delia Derbyshire
Number of Doctors: 1
The Doctor: Tom Baker (The Fourth Doctor)
Number of Companions: None Guest Cast: Peter Pratt (The Master) Additional Cast: Llewellyn Rees (The President), Angus Mackay (Cardinal Borusa), Bernard Horsfall (Chancellor Goth), George Pravda (Castellan Spandrell), Hugh Walters (Commentator Runcible), Erik Chitty (Co-ordinator Engin), Derek Seaton (Commander Hilred), Maurice Quick (Gold Usher), John Dawson (Time Lord), Michael Bilton (Time Lord), Peter Mayock (Solis), Helen Blatch (Voice)Setting: Gallifrey Villains:Chancellor Goth and The Master

The Episodes

No. Episodes Broadcast
(UK)
Duration Viewers
(Millions)
In Archive
436Part 130 October 197621'13"11.8PAL 2" colour videotape
437Part 206 November 197624'44"12.1PAL 2" colour videotape
438Part 313 November 197624'20"13.0PAL 2" colour videotape
439Part 420 November 197624'30"11.8PAL 2" colour videotape

Total Duration 1 Hour 35 Minutes


Audience Appreciation

Average Viewers (Millions) 12.2
Doctor Who Magazine Poll (1998)83.18%  (Position = 11 out of 159)
Doctor Who Magazine Poll (2003)715 Points (Position = 12 out of 159)
Doctor Who Magazine Poll (2009)83.58% Higher (Position = 20 out of 200)
Doctor Who Magazine Poll (2014)84.63% Higher (Position = 21 out of 241)


Archives


 All four episodes exist as PAL 2" colour videotapes.



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Notes


This story contains a number of significant firsts for the show. It greatly expands on the Time Lord society and mythology that was hinted at in "The Three Doctors" and only briefly glanced in "The War Games" – namely: Rassilon, the Matrix, the Panopticon, the Prydonian Academy and the Eye of Harmony. It also revealed more details about the Time Lords planet, Gallifrey.

However, the most significant aspects of this story are The Doctor travelling without a companion for the first time in the show’s history and the return of The Master, played by Peter Pratt - the first time this character has appeared in the show since Roger Delgado, who originally played The Master, tragically died in 1973. This is, however, Peter Pratt's only appearance in the role.

This is the only story of the original run of the show where The Doctor does not have a travelling companion, with Sarah Jane Smith (played by Elisabeth Sladen) departing in the previous story and Leela (played by Louise Jameson) joining in the next story. Appearing in a story on his own was reportedly at Tom Baker's request as he wanted to try a solo adventure.

Writer Robert Holmes later stated how difficult it was to write a script without anyone for The Doctor to share his thoughts and plans with (the consequence of which has him talking to himself more than usual). Although this story was well-received, the experiment of The Doctor having an adventure without a companion was not repeated until the 2008 Tenth Doctor story "Midnight" in the revived show, where The Doctor's then companion Donna Noble relaxes in a spa while he takes a sight-seeing trip.

The Doctor has had other solo adventures: The 1996 film "Doctor Who: The Movie", staring Paul McGann as the Eighth Doctor, and in the revived show would feature the Tenth Doctor on occasion collaborating with ‘one-off’ companions such as Donna Noble, in the 2006 Christmas special "The Runaway Bride" and Astrid Peth in the 2007 Christmas special "Voyage of the Damned". It is however, not until the 2009 story "The Next Doctor" that The Doctor would appear again in a story where there is no companion or companion-surrogate at all.

The part of Chancellor Goth was played by Bernard Horsfall who previously appeared as an unnamed Time Lord in the 1969 Second Doctor story "The War Games" - prompting some speculation that they were the same character. Bernard Horsfall has also appeared in the 1968 Second Doctor story "The Mind Robber", as Gulliver, and in the 1973 Third Doctor story "Planet of the Daleks", as a Thal called Taron. All three stories were also directed by David Maloney.

David Maloney’s last Doctor Who work, as Director, had been on the previous season’s "Planet of Evil". David Maloney worked closely with Designer Roger Murray-Leach and Costume Designer James Acheson to give Gallifrey a consistent and cohesive look. Although James Acheson would eventually be replaced on the story by Joan Ellacott, he contributed the Time Lords' distinctive high-collared apparel.

The Time Lords’ were depicted as being members of three Gallifreyan Chapters: the Prydonians (the 'notoriously devious' sect to whom The Doctor belongs) are colour coded scarlet and orange while the Arcalians wear green and Patrexes wear heliotrope.

However, having established, through Runcible's newscast, that the livery for the Prydonian chapter is the scarlet/orange combination, the major Prydonian character - Cardinal Borusa is seen in the purple robes (which is supposed to belong to the Patrex chapter).

Another distinctive trade-mark of the Time Lords, debuted in this story, was the Prydonian Seal which would subsequently become known as the ‘Seal of Rassilon’. This symbol however, was first seen, as the Vogans' emblem, in the 1975 story "Revenge of the Cybermen". The re-use of this symbol was carried out by Designer Roger Murray-Leach – who was the designer on the earlier Cyberman story.

Both the Time Lord’s costumes and the ‘Seal of Rassilon’ would become enduring elements of Gallifrey's portrayal in Doctor Who - even when the show was revived in 2005.

The title of this story, "The Deadly Assassin", is a tautology - an assassin is, by definition, deadly. This redundancy was parodied in the 1999 Comic Relief charity spoof "The Curse of Fatal Death".

This story features, at the beginning of the first episode, the first rolling caption and voiceover in the show. In this voiceover Tom Baker refers to Time Lords in the third person, over a text crawl similar to that seen in the opening of Star Wars (although "The Deadly Assassin" predates the premiere of Star Wars by six months). In this voiceover Tom Baker states: ‘Through the millennia, the Time Lords of Gallifrey led a life of peace and ordered calm, protected against all threats from lesser civilisations by their great power. But this was to change. Suddenly, and terribly, the Time Lords faced the most dangerous crisis in their long history...’.

The 1996 film "Doctor Who: The Movie", the 2005 Ninth Doctor story "Father's Day", the 2006 Tenth Doctor story "Army of Ghosts/Doomsday", and the 2009 story "The End of Time" are the only other stories so far that begin with a voiceover.

This story was largely inspired by the film and book The Manchurian Candidate. Even down to the inclusion of a Celestial Intervention Agency (CIA).

This story features an exclusively male cast, except for a female computer voice. Helen Blatch provided the voice of the computer voice heard in the first episode but she did not receive an on-screen credit for her involvement in this story.

This is the first story set entirely on Gallifrey and where every character is of the same race (Gallifreyan).

Before this story the Time Lords had been depicted in the show as essentially godlike individuals. To fill in the details of their culture writer Robert Holmes drew upon the fact that Gallifrey had in the past been seen to produce so many renegades - not just The Doctor and The Master, but also the Meddling Monk ("The Time Meddler"), the War Chief ("The War Games"), Omega ("The Three Doctors") and Morbius ("The Brain of Morbius").

This is the first story to state that a Time Lord is a limited number to only twelve regenerations and so thirteen incarnations. Previously in the "The War Games", The Doctor did qualify that his people can live forever ‘barring accidents’ and, in "The Brain of Morbius", the Fourth Doctor is heard to state that his people chose to not live forever because ‘death is the price of progress’. This story also serves as the first on-screen contradiction of the ‘mystery Doctors’ allegedly seen in "The Brain of Morbius".

The knowledge that Time Lords are able to regenerate up to twelve times is not unique to this story. It has been a major plot element of at least two other stories (the 1983 Fifth Doctor story "Mawdryn Undead" and the 1996 film "Doctor Who: The Movie") both of which involve villains attempting to steal The Doctor's remaining regenerations. Another reference to the Time Lords’ ability occurs in the 2008 Tenth Doctor story "The Next Doctor".

Despite being able to regenerate none of the Time Lords, who are killed in this story, are seen to regenerate.

Other concepts first used in this story include the Panopticon (the Time Lord’s ceremonial hall), the Castellan (the head of Capitol security), the Chancellery Guard, and the Matrix which is part of the Amplified Panotropic Computer net. The Matrix, or APC net, features in all subsequent Gallifrey set stories (with the exception of "The Five Doctors"). The Vardans are able to infiltrate it in "The Invasion of Time", which also establishes that the President has full control of the Matrix. Omega is able to take control of it in "Arc of Infinity" and the stealing of secret information from the Matrix sets in motion the events of the 1986 The Trial of a Time Lord season of stories.

Castellan Spandrell is heard to casually mention the Celestial Intervention Agency and it is implied that they had a hand in commuting The Doctor's exile in "The Three Doctors". It has also been assumed that the Celestial Intervention Agency were involved in placing The Doctor on trial in "The War Games" and used the Third Doctor and Fourth Doctor as reluctant agents in stories such "Colony in Space", "The Curse of Peladon", "Genesis of the Daleks" and "The Brain of Morbius". The Celestial Intervention Agency has also featured prominently in a number of spin-off novels and audios plays.

This story contains the first appearance of the character of Borusa. Borusa reappears in "The Invasion of Time", "Arc of Infinity" and "The Five Doctors". However, in each subsequent story, the character is played by a different actor also in this story Borusa has recently regenerated and is a Cardinal. In the three subsequent stories he is promoted in each interim; a Chancellor, President, and then Lord High President.

Co-ordinator Engin is heard to comment about the Plebian classes and Borusa's desire to prevent the Time Lord's leadership being undermined. This has led to long running speculation that not all the population of Gallifrey are Time Lords. Castellan Spandrell also refers to a group called Shobogans, who apparently are often responsible for acts of vandalism in the Citadel. The 1978 Story "The Invasion of Time" would reveal the existence of a group of Outsiders who claim to be Time Lords who left their society.

This story also introduces the iconic character of Rassilon who would be referred to constantly but unseen in person until the 2009 Tenth Doctor story "The End of Time". Rassilon who, along with Omega (introduced in "The Three Doctors") would become the central figure in Time Lord mythology. Interestingly when Rassilon's name is first mentioned, The Doctor inquires who he is.

Co-ordinator Engin reappears in the BBC Books’ The Eighth Doctor Stories novel "The Eight Doctors". While Chancellor Goth's brother, Rath, appears in the Virgin Books’ The New Adventures novel "Blood Harvest".

The BBC Books’ The Past Doctors Stories novel "Last of the Gaderene" and The Eighth Doctor Stories novel "Legacy of the Daleks" explain how The Master became how he appears. However, in terms of televised adventures, there is no indication that The Master seen in this story is necessarily the same incarnation of The Master as last seen portrayed by Roger Delgado in the 1973 Third Doctor story "Frontier in Space".

"The Keeper of Traken", "Logopolis", "Castrovalva", "The Five Doctors", and 1996 film "Doctor Who: The Movie" follow The Master's continuing quest for a new body.

The term Mutter's Spiral is used for the first time as a Time Lord reference for the location of Earth (presumed to refer to the Milky Way Galaxy). Earth is also referred to as Sol 3 (its Gallifreyan name) and is described as ‘an interesting little planet’. This name is again used in "The Invasion of Time", "The Sound of Drums/Last of the Time Lords" and "Voyage of the Damned".

This story drew considerable hostile commentary from Mary Whitehouse and the National Viewers and Listeners Association. This group particularly objected to the extended freeze frame, of Chancellor Goth drowning The Doctor, at the end of the third episode. Mary Whitehouse had attacked the programme on several occasions before, but never with such venom and conviction as she reserved for this particular broadcast. She often cited, in interviews, that this sequence was one of the most frightening scenes in Doctor Who - her reasoning being that children would not know if The Doctor survived until the following week and that they would have this strong image in their minds during all that time. This was the last such protest by the organisation against the show.

Unlike past complaints Mary Whitehouse’s complaint prompted an apology being made, from BBC Director General Sir Charles Curran, and for the BBC to edit the master tape to remove the original ending. Part four was also slightly edited. This edited version of this story was repeated on BBC One in August 1977.

Consequently, the BBC no longer holds a complete copy of the original episode. Fortunately a copy of episode three had been archived on a PAL U-matic Colour recording complete with the original ending thus making it possible for the ending of this episode to be restored for the VHS and subsequent DVD releases.

This story was first released in March 1989 in edited omnibus format in the US only. It was then released in an episodic format in the UK in October 1991. It was also re-mastered for the W H Smith exclusive Time Lord Collection in 2002 with a better quality freeze frame cliff-hanger for the third episode.



First and Last

The Firsts:

 The first time that The Doctor has no travelling companion.

 The first time that the Fourth Doctor meets The Master and the first time he appears since the Third Doctor story "Frontier in Space".

 The first story set entirely on Gallifrey and where every character is of the same race (Gallifreyan).

 The first mention of Time Lord key elements - namely the Matrix, the Panopticon, the Prydonian Academy and the Eye of Harmony.

 The first story to state that a Time Lord can only have twelve regenerations and so therefore thirteen incarnations.

 The first appearance of Borusa and the first mention of Rassilon.

 The first time the term ‘Mutter's Spiral’ is used as the Time Lord's reference for the location of Earth.

 The first use of a rolling caption and voiceover in the show.


The Lasts (Subject to Future Stories):

 The last time that The Doctor has no travelling companion until "Midnight" - a 2008 Tenth Doctor story.


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The Plot

WARNING: May Contain SpoilersHide Text
The Master
The Master

After receiving a mysterious summons from the Time Lords, which forces him to return Sarah Jane Smith to Earth and so travel alone in the TARDIS, The Doctor experiences a premonition about the President of the Time Lords being murdered.

The Doctor materialises the TARDIS in the cloisters area outside the Capitol on Gallifrey. There it is impounded by Chancellory guards, led by Commander Hilred, but The Doctor manages to elude them, his escape aided by a mysterious figure in black. He manages to return to the TARDIS before it is moved into a museum inside the Capitol, as an example of an antiquated Type 40 TT capsule, by order of Chancellor Goth.

The Doctor discovers that he has arrived on a Presidential Resignation Day, an important occasion in Time Lord life as the retiring President must name his successor. Speculation is rife as to who his choice might be. The favourite is Chancellor Goth but only the President knows for sure who the next President will be.

The Doctor
The Doctor

Donning the robes of one of the Time Lords, The Doctor arrives in the Panopticon, the centre of the time-honoured ritual. As he mingles he sees a staser weapon on the balcony aimed at where the President will appear and rushes to prevent the murder. When he arrives, there is no-one there, just the staser. Seeing a person with a gun in the crowd as the President appears, he aims the staser and fires ... and the President falls down dead, apparently shot by The Doctor.

The Doctor is arrested for murder and put on trial. But at the last moment he invokes Article 17 of the constitution and nominates himself as a presidential candidate. This gives him immunity until after the election, and as it is traditional for the incoming president to pardon all political prisoners, The Doctor seems to have secured his continued existence for the time being.

The Doctor in Prydonian Robes
The Doctor in Prydonian Robes

Further investigation reveals that behind all the machinations is The Master, now past his twelfth and final regeneration. This has resulted in him becoming a wizened husk. The Master is seeking to control the Presidency to obtain the symbols of office, the Sash and the Great Key of Rassilon, which in reality have a far more practical purpose than believed. They are the key to the Eye of Harmony, the legendary source of all the Time Lords power.

The Doctor realises that The Master sent him the premonition of the assassination through the Matrix which can turn thought patterns into virtual reality. The Matrix is part of an Amplified Panatropic Computations (APC) Net, a giant computer containing the accumulated wisdom of the Time Lords. The Doctor decides, with the help of Coordinator Engin and Castellan Spandrell, to enter the Matrix as a means of tracking The Master. Coordinator Engin however, warns him that if he dies in the virtual world, he will die in the real world as well.

On entering the Matrix, The Doctor finds himself in a forbidding landscape of crumbling white cliffs and sparse vegetation. The Doctor soon becomes engaged in a series of surreal nightmare situations. First he nearly walks into the open jaws of a hungry crocodile, which simply disappears into thin air. He is then attacked by a masked samurai warrior and falls from a cliff into unconsciousness. When he wakes up The Doctor finds himself on an outdoor operating table. A masked surgeon, holding an extremely large hypodermic needle, is standing over him. The Doctor manages to push the surgeon away. But as he runs off he find himself in the midst of a World War I battle. With the sound of explosions and machine gun fire all around him gas canisters start explode all around him as a soldier upon a horse stumbles out of the smoke. Both are wearing gas masks. While escaping The Doctor comes upon a railway track. But he becomes trapped when one of the rails closes upon one of his boots. A group of three masked men then appear and one attempts to run him down with a mine train.

Chancellor Goth
Chancellor Goth

Luckily for The Doctor the train suddenly disappears before it hits him. As The Doctor works his foot free he realises that his surroundings are but an illusion and so tries to deny their existence, but he passes out from the strain. Recovering consciousness he becomes aware of the two large black eyes of his unknown adversary in the side of a cliff, telling him that he is the creator of this world and that there is no escape. The Doctor, dehydrated and thirsty, hears the sound of running water, but when he attempts to dig into the ground to locate its source he is greeted by a red-nosed clown peering back at him through a window, laughing manically. A biplane, flown by a masked pilot, then appears in the sky and The Doctor is strafed by machine gun fire. Despite his efforts to escape from the biplane The Doctor is eventually shot in the leg.

The dry barren virtual environment of the Matrix turns into a thick, sticky jungle, and The Doctor finds himself being pursued by an assassin who is dressed as a big game hunter wearing a mesh veil to obscure his face. After an attempt to poison The Doctor fails a life-or-death struggle with the mysterious hooded opponent, who is revealed to be Chancellor Goth whom The Master has been using as a puppet, takes place in which The Doctor is very nearly killed when Chancellor Goth holds The Doctor's head underwater, intent on drowning him. Despite receiving a number of wounds The Doctor proves the stronger of the two.

The Master, realising that Goth has been effectively defeated, tries to trap The Doctor in the Matrix by overloading the neuron fields, even though this will kill Goth. Engin though manages to get The Doctor out of the Matrix, but Goth is fatally burnt. Then realising that The Doctor had managed to escape from the Matrix, The Master absconds with the Sash and the Great Key of Rassilon and reveals the Eye of Harmony located beneath the Panopticon floor. He starts to disconnect the device so that, using the Sash, he can draw off enough power to enable him to regenerate, but The Doctor manages to stop him before Gallifrey is destroyed. The Master however, falls down one of the fissures which have opened up in the floor.

Now free to return to his TARDIS, and believing his old adversary dead, The Doctor bids farewell to Borusa, Spandrell, and Engin and leaves Gallifrey. But he does not see that The Master has in fact survived, having absorbed sufficient energy through the Sash. As The Doctor’s TARDIS dematerialises, Spandrell and Engin witness The Master sneak into his own TARDIS – disguised as a grandfather clock – and so make his escape.

 
Castellan Spandrell
Castellan Spandrell
Lord President of the Time Lords
Lord President of the Time Lords
Assassination
Assassination
The Doctor Flanked by Guards
The Doctor Flanked by Guards
 
Danger in the Matrix
Danger in the Matrix
The Doctor is Taunted
The Doctor is Taunted
The Doctor Inside the Matrix
The Doctor Inside the Matrix
The Master
The Master




Quote of the Story


 'You do not understand hatred as I understand it. Only hate keeps me alive. Why else should I endure this pain?'

The Master



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Release Information

FormatTitleRelease Date (UK)Code NumberCover ArtRemarks
Audio
LP
Science-Fiction Sound Effects No. 191978REC 316Sound Effects
Audio
Tape
Science-Fiction Sound Effects No. 191978Sound Effects
Video
VHS
The Deadly AssassinOctober 1991BBCV 4645Andrew Skilleter
Video
VHS
The Tom Baker YearsSeptember 1992BBCV 4839PhotoClip only Introduced and commented on by Tom Baker Double cassette release
Video
VHS
The Deadly AssassinSeptember 2002BBCV 7365Photo-montageRemastered version Part of the "The Time Lord Collection Boxed Set" released by WH Smith
Video
DVD
The Deadly AssassinMay 2009BBCDVD 2430
Video
Blu-Ray
Doctor Who: The Collection - Season 14May 2020Photo-montageBlu-Ray boxed set containing 6 specially restored stories


In Print

FormatTitleRelease Date (UK)PublisherAuthorCover ArtRemarks
Novel
Novel
Doctor Who and the Deadly AssassinOctober 1977Target No. 19Terrance DicksMike LittleISBN: 0-426-11965-7
Novel
Novel
The Further Adventures of Doctor Who1985TargetTerrance DicksUS in hardback. Released along with "Doctor Who and the Face of Evil" and "Doctor Who and the Robots of Death"
Novel
Novel
Doctor Who Classics: The Seeds of Doom & The Deadly AssassinMay 1989Star BooksTerrance DicksMike LittleDouble story release.
ISBN: 0-352-32416-3
CD
CD
The Deadly AssassinMarch 2015Target No. 19Terrance DicksMike LittleAudio version of the Target Novel read by Geoffrey Beevers (The Master)
Doctor Who CMS Magazine (In Vision)Issue 18 (Released: August 1989)
Doctor Who Magazine - ArchiveIssue 108 (Released: January 1986)
Doctor Who Magazine - ArchiveIssue 187 (Released: June 1992)
Doctor Who Magazine - The Fact of FictionIssue 332 (Released: July 2003)
Doctor Who Magazine - Time TeamIssue 353 (Released: March 2005)
Doctor Who DVD FilesVolume 52 (Released: December 2010)

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Tom Baker
The Fourth Doctor

   





On Release

Audio LP - Sound Effects No. 19
Audio LP - Sound Effects No. 19

BBC
AUDIO
VHS Video Cover
VHS Video Cover

BBC
VIDEO
Tom Baker Years VHS Video Cover
Tom Baker Years VHS Video Cover

BBC
VIDEO
   
W.H. Smith VHS Video Cover
W.H. Smith VHS Video Cover

BBC
VIDEO
DVD Cover
DVD Cover

BBC
VIDEO
The Collection Season 14 Blu-Ray Cover
The Collection Season 14 Blu-Ray Cover

BBC
VIDEO
   


In Print

Target Book Cover
Target Book Cover

Target
NOVEL
The Further Adventures of Doctor Who Cover
The Further Adventures of Doctor Who Cover

Target
NOVEL
Doctor Who Classics Cover
Doctor Who Classics Cover

Star Books
NOVEL
Target Audio CD Cover
Target Audio CD Cover

BBC
CD
   



Magazines

Doctor Who CMS Magazine (In Vision): Issue 18
Doctor Who CMS Magazine (In Vision): Issue 18

CMS
Doctor Who Magazine - Archive: Issue 108
Doctor Who Magazine - Archive: Issue 108

Marvel Comics
Doctor Who Magazine - Archive: Issue 187
Doctor Who Magazine - Archive: Issue 187

Marvel Comics
   
Doctor Who Magazine - The Fact of Fiction: Issue 332
Doctor Who Magazine - The Fact of Fiction: Issue 332

Marvel Comics
Doctor Who Magazine - Time Team: Issue 353
Doctor Who Magazine - Time Team: Issue 353

Marvel Comics
Doctor Who DVD Files: Volume 52
Doctor Who DVD Files: Volume 52

GE Fabbri
   

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