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Sylvester McCoy
Time and The Rani
Seventh Doctor Logo


Synopsis


The Doctor and The Rani
The Doctor and The Rani
 The Rani has taken control of the planet Lakertya and forced the peaceful Lakertyans to build a rocket silo-cum laboratory base into a cliff face. She is aided by the Tetraps, a race of bat-like creatures, and plans to fire a rocket loaded with loyhargil, a substance with the same properties as strange matter, at an asteroid completely composed of the latter.

 As a preliminary to this she has created a huge artificial brain and kidnapped a number of geniuses – Including Pasteur and Einstein from Earth - to imbue it with the ability first to identify and then to calculate the correct way to create loyhargil for her in the laboratory. The newly-regenerated Doctor and Mel must stop her and save the planet…

Source: BBC DVD


General Information

Season: Twenty Four
Production Code: 7D
Story Number: 144
Episode Numbers:654 - 657
Number of Episodes: 4
Percentage of Episodes Held:100%
Working Titles:"Strange Matter"
Production Dates: April - May 1987
Broadcast Started: 07 September 1987
Broadcast Finished: 28 September 1987
Colour Status: Colour
Studio: BBC Television Centre (TC1 and TC8)
Location: Cloford Quarry (Cloford, Frome, Somerset), Westdown Quarry (Chantry, Frome, Somerset) and Whatley Quarry (Whatley, Frome, Somerset)
Writer:Pip and Jane Baker
Director:Andrew Morgan
Producer:John Nathan-Turner
Script Editor:Andrew Cartmel
Production Assistant:Joy Sinclair
Production Associate:Anne Faggetter
Assistant Floor Managers:Christopher Sandeman and Joanna Newbery
Designer:Geoff Powell
Costume Designer:Ken Trew
Make-Up Designer:Lesley Rawstorne
Cameramen:Alastair Mitchell and John Hawes
Incidental Music:Keff McCulloch
Special Sounds (SFX Editor):Dick Mills
Studio Sounds:Brian Clark
Lighting:Henry Barber
Visual Effects:Colin Mapson
Title Sequence:Oliver Elmes
Title Music:Ron Grainer and the BBC Radiophonic Workshop. Arranged by Keff McCulloch
Number of Doctors: 2
The Doctors: Sylvester McCoy (The Seventh Doctor) (Newly Regenerated) and Sylvester McCoy (The Sixth Doctor) (Regenerates)
Number of Companions: 1The Companion: Bonnie Langford (Melanie Bush) Guest Cast: Kate O'Mara (The Rani) Additional Cast: Mark Greenstreet (Ikona), Wanda Ventham (Faroon), Donald Pickering (Beyus), Karen Clegg (Sarn), Richard Gauntlett (Urak), John Segal (Lanisha), Peter Tuddenham (Special Voice), Jacki Webb (Special Voice)Setting: Lakertya Villains:Tetraps and The Rani

The Episodes

No. Episodes Broadcast
(UK)
Duration Viewers
(Millions)
In Archive
654Part 107 September 198724'44"5.1PAL 1" colour videotape
655Part 214 September 198724'36"4.2PAL 1" colour videotape
656Part 321 September 198724'23"4.3PAL 1" colour videotape
657Part 428 September 198724'38"4.9PAL 1" colour videotape

Total Duration 1 Hour 38 Minutes


Audience Appreciation

Average Viewers (Millions) 4.6
Doctor Who Magazine Poll (1998)46.86%  (Position = 154 out of 159)
Doctor Who Magazine Poll (2009)42.47% Lower (Position = 198 out of 200)
Doctor Who Magazine Poll (2014)45.09% Higher (Position = 239 out of 241)


Archives


 All four episodes exist as PAL 1" colour videotapes. A 71-edit scratch print of all episodes also exists.



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Notes


This story was the first to feature Sylvester McCoy as the Seventh Doctor. It also features the last appearance of the Sixth Doctor, who briefly appears at the start of this story, his face obscured to mask the fact that he too is portrayed by Sylvester McCoy.

With just a few months to go before the start of production on Season Twenty Four John Nathan-Turner, the show’s current Producer, was informed that the agreement, that Season Twenty Three was to be his last as Producer, had been rescinded. This left him with very little time to find an actor to play the part of the Seventh Doctor, a new Script Editor, and a full slate of stories.

Pip and Jane Baker were commissioned to write this story. Due to the short timescale that John Nathan-Turner had this husband-and-wife team were chosen because they had demonstrated the previous year that they could deliver scripts quickly, based on their short-notice writing of episodes nine through twelve and fourteen of The Trial of a Time Lord.

This story’s ‘problems’ can be partly explained as Pip and Jane Baker had no idea, at first, who would be playing the new Doctor or how he would be characterised - and, when they started work on the project, the show had no Script Editor for them to discuss things with.

Pip and Jane Baker were asked to write their scripts for the Sixth Doctor and to include a climactic regeneration sequence. Originally they had The Doctor staying behind at The Rani’s headquarters to ensure nothing went wrong with the missile strike. The ensuing explosion causes him to regenerate.

Colin Baker, who had been the Sixth Doctor and who had been sacked from the show, had been offered the chance to appear in the first four-part story of the new season in order to facilitate a regeneration scene. However, Colin Baker declined this invitation - deciding instead that it was best, from both a personal and a professional perspective, to make a clean break from Doctor Who.

Because of this it was decided to include a pre-titles sequence to unveil the new Doctor. This therefore is the first time The Doctor is seen regenerating at the beginning of a story, as opposed to its end (barring recap footage).

Originally, John Nathan-Turner had preferred not to include the regeneration itself as Urak would turn over the unconscious Doctor to reveal his new face. He would later change his mind, however, with the regeneration being achieved using a computer effect over the face of Sylvester McCoy wearing a blond wig to mimic Colin Baker’s hair - so making him the only actor to play two different incarnations of The Doctor.

This regeneration sequence replaced an earlier pre-titles scene, which would have seen King Solomon - later Albert Einstein - kidnapped by The Rani.

To play the part of the Seventh Doctor two separate people suggested Sylvester McCoy to John Nathan-Turner. These were BBC producer Clive Doig and literary agent Brian Wheeler. It has also been revealed that Sylvester McCoy himself had telephoned the Doctor Who production office about a week earlier to indicate his interest in the part. Despite having doubts John Nathan-Turner went to see Sylvester McCoy perform in a theatrical production of The Pied Piper. This led to an interview a few days later, after which John Nathan-Turner believed his search was over.

Head of Drama Jonathan Powell was more reticent, however, and asked John Nathan-Turner to consider other possibilities as well. A number of actors auditioned alongside actress Janet Fielding, who had played companion Tegan Jovanka (as current companion Bonnie Langford being occupied with her theatrical work at the time). After these auditions it was agreed that Sylvester McCoy was the most suitable actor for the role and so Sylvester McCoy signed a three-year contract to play The Doctor. Sylvester McCoy’s lengthy career included various theatrical comedy and television roles, the latter including such programmes as Tiswas and Jigsaw.

The new Script Editor to replace Eric Saward, who had quit midway through Season Twenty Three, was Andrew Cartmel. Andrew Cartmel was working for a computer company when his agent, Richard Wakely, recommended him to John Nathan-Turner. Liking what he saw of Andrew Cartmel’s writing, the producer hired him to complete the necessary work on Season Twenty Four.

With Colin Baker no longer taking part in this story or doing a regeneration scene Pip and Jane Baker set about putting the finishing touches on their scripts, using Sylvester McCoy’s audition tape as a basis from which to write for the new Doctor. The Doctor’s dialogue underwent further amendments by John Nathan-Turner and Andrew Cartmel, who had come up with the idea of The Doctor’s misquoted proverbs as a way of distancing the character from that portrayed by Colin Baker, who was prone to verbose pronouncements. This trait though would vanish by the end of the season as it was ignored by future writers of the show.

The Director assigned to this story was Andrew Morgan, who had earlier turned down the chance to direct the 1982 Fifth Doctor story "Time-Flight" Andrew Morgan had previously directed episodes of Softly, Softly: Task Force and Blake’s 7.

This was the second and final appearance in the show of The Rani whom Pip and Jane Baker had created for the 1985 Sixth Doctor story "The Mark of The Rani". Kate O’Mara had recently returned to England after spending a year in Hollywood appearing on the prime time soap opera Dynasty, and had affirmed her interest in reprising her role as The Rani. Kate O’Mara returned to portray The Rani in the Thirtieth-Anniversary Children In Need special "Dimensions in Time", in 1993, as well as the BBV audio adventure "The Rani Reaps the Whirlwind" - the last of which reveals The Rani’s fate.

Wanda Ventham (who played Faroon) and Donald Pickering (who played Beyus) previously appeared together in the 1967 Second Doctor story "The Faceless Ones" as Jean Rock and Blade respectively. Donald Pickering also appeared, as Eyesen, in the 1964 First Doctor story "The Keys of Marinus" while Wanda Ventham also appeared, as Thea Ransome, in the 1977 Fourth Doctor story "Image of the Fendahl".

By now it was generally agreed that the Sixth Doctor’s bad-taste outfit had been a bad mistake – thus prompting a more subdued costume for the Seventh Doctor. It was therefore decided, in consultation with Sylvester McCoy, to opt for a costume which would appear to be normal at a distance and unusual only on closer inspection.

It has been revealed that Ken Trew created the Seventh Doctor’s costume, based on a 1930s golfing design and the straw hat was inspired by the outfit Sylvester McCoy had worn to his initial meeting with John Nathan-Turner. The only element disliked by the actor was the question-mark pullover, included at John Nathan-Turner’s insistence. Sylvester McCoy protested about wearing this part of his costume which eventually resulted in him having a question mark umbrella as a replacement.

With the change of lead actor, John Nathan Turner decided that Season Twenty Four needed a new title sequence so he approached Oliver Elmes of the BBC’s graphics department about devising an entirely new logo and title sequence which moved away from the ‘starfield’ motif introduced in 1980. With the assistance of CAL Video, Oliver Elmes devised his new sequence entirely on computer. In addition, much of the effects (such as the bubble Melanie is trapped in) were done in the same manner.

It has been reported that John Nathan-Turner was generally happy with the new sequence, his only concern was regarding The Doctor’s face - which forms out of the stars and nebulae - being too indistinct. Oliver Elmes therefore superimposed a more detailed image on top of his originally footage. The original broadcast, of the fourth episode, however, featured an early version of the new opening titles. This was corrected for the video release.

As with the opening sequence from the Sixth Doctor era, the Seventh Doctor’s opening does not use a static image of The Doctor, but rather one with limited animation: the image starts as a scowl, then The Doctor winks and smiles. Sylvester McCoy also wears makeup that gives his face and hair a silver/grey appearance.

This was the first completely new logo and title sequence since Season Eighteen and marked the first time the show’s titles were created with a computer.

This new design also meant a slight modification in the way each episode began - although the story name and author credit still formed part of the title sequence, the episode number would now appear during the opening scene.

A new arrangement of Ron Grainer’s theme music was also created. This was partly because the new sequence was considerably longer than the previous version, and partly because Dominic Glynn’s Season Twenty Three arrangement had not been particularly well-received. This new arrangement was carried out by Keff McCulloch, who also provided the incidental music for this story, and was used until the end of the original run of the show.

This new theme arrangement marked the first time since the First Doctor’s era that the theme’s ‘middle eight’ section was regularly heard during the opening credits (the previous two arrangements used the middle eight during the closing credits only).

This story features a pre-credits sequence (only the third time in the show’s history, after the 1982 Fifth Doctor story "Castrovalva" and the Twentieth Anniversary special "The Five Doctors") featuring the TARDIS crash-landing on the planet Lakertya.

With the start of this season the BBC decided once again decided to shift Doctor Who out of its Saturday teatime slot and to show it on a weekday, as had been the case between Season Nineteen and Season Twenty One. However, unlike these earlier seasons the episodes in this season were broadcast just once a week (specifically, on Mondays) and at a much later time, infamously putting it up against ITV’s soap opera Coronation Street.

There were additional sequences written that featured the scientists The Rani had captured, which were not filmed.

The Doctor is seen trying on several earlier costumes including the Second Doctor’s fur coat, the Third Doctor’s smoking jacket, the Fourth Doctor’s coat and scarf and the Fifth Doctor’s cricket outfit, as well as other costumes. He also wears the Sixth Doctor’s patchwork coat for much of the first episode, the first example of a Doctor wearing his previous self’s clothes for a prolonged period rather than quickly changing after a regeneration.

The Doctor is heard to state that this is his seventh incarnation.

The Doctor refers to his new regeneration as his ‘seventh persona’. This once again settles the question of The Doctor having other regenerations before the First Doctor. This theory came about because in the 1976 Fourth Doctor story "The Brain of Morbius" there had been strong suggestions that there had been previous incarnations of The Doctor.

The Rani is able to check that The Doctor’s hearts are beating simply by placing a hand on his chest. While The Doctor is able to check Melanie’s pulse with his thumbs.

The Lakertyans are represented as civilised reptilian humanoids.

Loyhargil is a lightweight substitute for Strange Matter. ‘Loyhargil’ is also an anagram of ‘holy grail’.

The Doctor states that he and The Rani are both 953. However, the Sixth Doctor claimed he was 900 in the 1985 story "Revelation of the Daleks" and again in the 2005 Ninth Doctor story "Aliens of London/World War Three". The Tenth Doctor also claimed he was 906 in the 2010/11 story "The End of Time". The Eleventh Doctor then claimed that he was 907, in the 2010 story "The Time of Angels/Flesh and Stone", and 909 in the 2011 story "The Impossible Astronaut/Day of the Moon".

Amongst the famous Humans that The Doctor mentions towards the end of this story, as he explains to Melanie the severity of The Rani’s plans, are Elvis and Mrs Malaprop (a fictional character). This is a reference to the Seventh Doctor’s frequent use of Malapropisms throughout this story.

This is the only Doctor Who story to mention Elvis.

This story contains a number of errors. Namely: In order to release the Lakertyans from The Rani’s deadly bracelets, The Doctor and Melanie use a fibre optic cable to complete an electrical circuit; Without appearing to make any adjustments to the TARDIS The Rani is able to patch Urak’s vision straight into the TARDIS scanner;

The Tetraps have eyes in the front, sides and back of their heads so why do they need to turn their heads when looking for something?; Sylvester McCoy pronounces ‘Princeton University’ as ‘Prince Town’ without narrative cause. Since ‘Princeton’ has more or less standard pronunciation across all English dialects - even Scottish ones - this is simply a fluff by Sylvester McCoy; The overhead microphone is visible in the first episode, in the scene just after The Rani introduces herself as Melanie. It is obvious that the boom operator has trouble following The Doctor’s erratic movements.

Most glaring error of all is why does The Doctor regenerate? When the TARDIS crash lands Melanie is barely stunned, but strangely it is enough to trigger The Doctor’s regeneration.

A number of spin-off media have provided additional explanation for The Doctor’s regeneration including Virgin Books’ The New Adventures novels: "Timewyrm: Revelation", written by Paul Cornell, "Love and War", written by Paul Cornell, "Head Games" written by Steve Lyons - all of which speculate that the Seventh Doctor’s ‘essence’ drove the Sixth Doctor to pilot the TARDIS into The Rani’s tractor beam to become Time’s Champion and prevent himself from becoming The Valeyard. While BBC Books’ The Past Doctors Stories novel "Spiral Scratch", written by Gary Russell, features the Sixth Doctor sacrificing much of his energy to prevent a pan-dimensional being from destroying creation thus leaving him in a weakened physical condition before The Rani’s attack.

It is never explained how The Rani escaped the predicament in which she had last been seen in the "The Mark of The Rani" where she becomes trapped with The Master in her TARDIS by a rapidly-growing Tyrannosaurus rex embryo. The Target novelisation of this story, written by Pip and Jane Baker, claims that the rapidly-growing dinosaur snapped its neck on the ceiling of The Rani’s TARDIS and died instantly, while the Virgin Books’ The Missing Adventures novel "State of Change", written by Christopher Bulis, revealed that The Master escaped the Rani’s TARDIS by separating the Console Room from the rest of the ship, forcing The Rani to cannibalise other controls in her TARDIS to pilot it prior to the events of the novel.

The Target novelisation of this story features a longer finale for the Sixth Doctor while the Tetraps seem to speak English backwards.

This story would prove to be the final Doctor Who story written by Pip and Jane Baker. They continued to write for a variety of media, including contributions to the series Watt on Earth.

The final part of the BBC Books’ The Past Doctors Stories novel "Spiral Scratch", written by Gary Russell, leads into this story as (paradoxically) does the unofficial novel "Time’s Champion" that was written by Craig Hinton, in 2008, as a charity venture in aid of the British Heart Foundation.



First and Last

The Firsts:

 The first story of Season Twenty Four.

 Sylvester McCoy's first appearance as the Seventh Doctor.

 The first time The Doctor is seen regenerating at the beginning of a story, as opposed to its end.

 The first time the show’s titles were created with a computer.

 Andrew Cartmel's first involvement in the show as Script Editor.

 The first Doctor Who story to be directed by Andrew Morgan.

 Keff McCulloch's first involvement in the show providing the incidental music.


The Lasts (Subject to Future Stories):

 The last appearance of the Sixth Doctor.

 The last appearance in the show for The Rani played by Kate O'Mara.


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The Plot

WARNING: May Contain SpoilersHide Text
Regeneration
Regeneration

The TARDIS is attacked by a powerful force whilst in flight and the Sixth Doctor and his travelling companion Melanie Bush are both knocked to the floor, unconscious. The TARDIS then materialises on the planet Lakertya, observed by one of the natives, Ikona. The TARDIS doors open and the renegade Time Lady known as The Rani enters - it was she who was responsible for the attack. She tells an unseen companion to leave the girl but to bring The Doctor. As she leaves, a lumbering, hair-covered creature enters the TARDIS. As the creature turns The Doctor’s prone body over, The Doctor’s face blurs and changes as he regenerates into a new form.

Back in her lair The Rani finishes supervising two Lakertyans, Beyus and his daughter Sarn, as they store the kidnapped genius Einstein in a sealed cabinet alongside a number of others. The Doctor meanwhile regains consciousness in The Rani’s laboratory. He seems manic and disorientated but recognises The Rani. Examining her equipment he sees an asteroid which he identifies as being composed of Strange Matter.

Sarn runs away and encounters Melanie who had been rescued from the TARDIS by Ikona. Sarn, on seeing Melanie, panics and trips a wire which creates a transparent bubble, that traps her inside. The bubble bounces around the cliffs and rocks before exploding, reducing Sarn to a smoking skeleton. Having watched this The Rani orders Urak, a bat-like creature known as a Tetrap, to reset the trap while she injects The Doctor with something to give him amnesia. When The Doctor comes round, The Rani pretends to be Melanie in order to persuade him to repair a faulty machine in her laboratory. The Doctor though is puzzled and confused at first and refuses to continue to work for The Rani. He and The Rani return to his TARDIS to fetch a radiation wave meter. There, The Doctor changes his clothes, trying on those previously worn by the Second Doctor, the Third Doctor, the Fourth Doctor and the Fifth Doctor amongst others, before settling on a new outfit for himself.

A Confused Doctor
A Confused Doctor

Meanwhile after the death of Sarn, Ikona believes Melanie to be in league with The Rani. She saves him from another of the bubble traps - thus convincing him that she is a friend. But then Melanie sees Urak and in trying to escape she stumbles into a bubble trap. Caught inside the bubble, Melanie finds herself bouncing over a cliff and landing on a lake. Ikona rescues her and they retrieve some weapons before being attacked by another Tetrap. Escaping, they head for The Rani’s fortress where Ikona meets Sarn’s mother Faroon who they tell about her daughter’s death.

The Rani goes to fetch some vital material for The Doctor to use in the machine, but is captured by Urak who mistakes her for Melanie. Melanie meanwhile makes her way into The Rani’s control room where The Doctor believes her to be The Rani. The two travellers eventually convince each other that they are who they say they are by feeling each other’s pulses. Beyus helps them to escape by telling The Doctor the combination to unlock the control room door - it is 953, which is both The Doctor’s and The Rani’s age. However, outside the control room, Melanie finds the cabinets containing the kidnapped geniuses and sees that one is reserved for The Doctor. The Rani returns and, while Melanie, Beyus and Faroon escape, The Doctor hides in a dark Tetrap eyrie but The Rani locks the gate behind him and he finds himself surrounded by the awaking Tetraps.

A Tetrap
A Tetrap

Beyus though rescues The Doctor and tells him to go to the Lakertyan’s Centre of Leisure, where the reason for his obedience to The Rani will be revealed. The Doctor takes a micro-thermistor from The Rani’s machine and soon arrives at the Centre. There The Doctor and Ikona find that the Lakertyan people are lethargic and apathetic. There is a new globe-like device suspended from the Centre, but no-one will tell the distressed Ikona what it is for. The Rani, using a remote control, suddenly stops the globe from spinning, causing killer insects to emerge from it. The Doctor, Beyus and the other Lakertyans run screaming from the Centre to escape the swarm.

Meanwhile Melanie is captured by the Tetraps and paralysed by a sting from the tongue of one of them. The Rani gets Faroon to give The Doctor a message that she will exchange Melanie for the micro-thermistor. Faroon delivers her message to The Doctor, who agrees to the proposed exchange. The Rani however, tricks him as the ‘Melanie’ she releases is revealed to be only a holographic projection. Having gained the micro-thermistor The Rani reinserts it in her machine, making it operational, but finds that the combined brain power of the kidnapped geniuses is still not sufficient for her purposes. Urak suggests that she link her own brain in. She refuses and orders that The Doctor’s cabinet be prepared.

The Doctor notes that The Rani has a fixed trajectory rocket launcher and realises that she must be working to meet a specific deadline. Ikona distracts the Tetrap guarding the entrance to The Rani’s fortress allowing The Doctor to enter. But he is caught by Urak, paralysed and placed in his cabinet. The Rani then enters a sealed room, followed by Melanie. Inside is a massive brain. With The Doctor’s input, the brain is able to start carrying out the calculations that The Rani desires.

The Rani
The Rani

The Rani though realises that The Doctor is confusing the brain and orders him disconnected. The Doctor jumps from his cabinet, and he and Melanie then trap The Rani inside it. Back in the control room, The Doctor finds that The Rani’s rocket is intended to strike the asteroid of Strange Matter. He and Melanie watch a recording of a supernova on a screen. Melanie realises that The Rani is using the brain to come up with a lightweight substitute for the Strange Matter in order to detonate the asteroid.

The Rani manages to escape from the cabinet and then explains her plan to The Doctor and Melanie. She needs helium-2. This will fuse with the upper Lakertyan atmosphere to form a shell of chronons - discrete particles of time - and then the brain will multiply, filling the gap between shell and planet, thereby creating a time manipulator, a cerebral mass capable of dominating and controlling time anywhere in the cosmos. Urak overhears The Rani boasting that all life on Lakertya will be destroyed. The Doctor gives the brain the correct formula and it devises loyhargil as the substance required. As the production of loyhargil starts in The Rani’s laboratory, The Doctor and Mel escape from the fortress.

The Doctor helps remove control devices from the Lakertyans, that will reduce the wearer to a skeleton if removed, before returning to the fortress where he places them around the brain. Beyus stays to complete this task as The Doctor, Melanie and Faroon escape. The Doctor then confronts The Rani, who detonates the devices. The brain however completes its countdown and the rocket launches, but because of The Doctor’s interference it misses the asteroid. On realising that The Doctor has messed up her plans The Rani escapes to her TARDIS, but she discovers that it has been commandeered by the Tetraps who decide to take her as a prisoner back to their home world.

With The Rani defeated The Doctor gives the Lakertyans the antidote to the killer insects, but Ikona pours it away as he believes they should solve their own problems from now on. As the TARDIS dematerialises, with all the captured geniuses aboard the TARDIS so that he can return them home, Melanie tells The Doctor that he will take a bit of getting used to, which he replies: ‘I'll grow on you, Mel. I'll grow on you’.

 
Melanie
Melanie
The Doctor
The Doctor
The Rani Disguised as Melanie
The Rani Disguised as Melanie
The Rani with the Brain
The Rani with the Brain
 
The Lakertyan and The Doctor
The Lakertyan and The Doctor
Ikona
Ikona
The Rani Hanging from the Tetrap Ceiling
The Rani Hanging from the Tetrap Ceiling
The Doctor and Melanie
The Doctor and Melanie




Quote of the Story


 'You don't understand regeneration, Mel. It's a lottery, and I've drawn the short plank.'

The Doctor



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Release Information

FormatTitleRelease Date (UK)Code NumberCover ArtRemarks
Audio
LP
The Doctor Who 25th Anniversary Album1988REC 707Music score
Audio
Tape
The Doctor Who 25th Anniversary Album1988ZCF 707Music score
Audio
CD
The Doctor Who 25th Anniversary Album1988Music score
Audio
CD
Music From Doctor Who1988CD 579Music score
Video
VHS
Time and the RaniJuly 1995BBCV 5617Colin Howard
Audio
CD
Evolution - The Music From Dr WhoDecember 2001Music score
Video
DVD
Time and the RaniSeptember 2010BBCDVD 2808
Video
DVD
Time and the RaniJune 2013BBCDVD 3801Photo-montagePart of the "Regeneration" Box Set
Audio
CD
The 50th Anniversary CollectionDecember 2013Photo-montageOriginal Television Soundtracks


In Print

FormatTitleRelease Date (UK)PublisherAuthorCover ArtRemarks
Novel
Novel
Time and the RaniMay 1988Target No. 128Pip and Jane BakerPhotographISBN: 0-426-20331-3.
Book incorrectly numbered 127.
Novel
Novel
Time and the RaniOctober 1991Target No. 128Pip and Jane BakerAlister PearsonVirgin new cover reprint.
ISBN: 0-426-20331-3.
Book incorrectly numbered 127.
Doctor Who CMS Magazine (In Vision)Issue 91 (Released: August 2000)
Doctor Who Magazine - PreviewIssue 128 (Released: September 1987)
Doctor Who Magazine - After ImageIssue 132 (Released: January 1988)
Doctor Who Magazine - ArchiveIssue 198 (Released: April 1993)
Doctor Who Magazine - The Fact of FictionIssue 366 (Released: March 2006)
Doctor Who Magazine - Time TeamIssue 401 (Released: November 2008)
Doctor Who DVD FilesVolume 99 (Released: October 2012)

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Photo Gallery


The Doctor and Companion

Sylvester McCoy
The Seventh Doctor

Sylvester McCoy
The Sixth Doctor
   

 
Bonnie Langford
Melanie Bush
 
   




On Release

Audio LP - Doctor Who the 25th Anniversary Album
Audio LP - Doctor Who the 25th Anniversary Album

BBC
AUDIO
Audio Tape - Doctor Who the 25th Anniversary Album
Audio Tape - Doctor Who the 25th Anniversary Album

BBC
AUDIO
Doctor Who the 25th Anniversary Album CD Cover
Doctor Who the 25th Anniversary Album CD Cover

BBC
AUDIO
   
Music From Doctor Who CD Cover
Music From Doctor Who CD Cover

Sanctury Records
AUDIO
VHS Video Cover
VHS Video Cover

BBC
VIDEO
Evolution CD Cover
Evolution CD Cover

Prestige Records
AUDIO
   
DVD Cover
DVD Cover

BBC
VIDEO
DVD Box Set
DVD Box Set

BBC
VIDEO
The 50th Anniversary Collection Cover
The 50th Anniversary Collection Cover

BBC
AUDIO
   


In Print

Target Book Cover
Target Book Cover

Target
NOVEL
 
Reprinted Virgin Book Cover
Reprinted Virgin Book Cover

Virgin
NOVEL
   


Magazines

Doctor Who CMS Magazine (In Vision): Issue 91
Doctor Who CMS Magazine (In Vision): Issue 91

CMS
Doctor Who Magazine - Preview: Issue 128
Doctor Who Magazine - Preview: Issue 128

Marvel Comics
Doctor Who Magazine - After Image: Issue 132
Doctor Who Magazine - After Image: Issue 132

Marvel Comics
Doctor Who Magazine - Archive: Issue 198
Doctor Who Magazine - Archive: Issue 198

Marvel Comics
   
Doctor Who Magazine - The Fact of Fiction: Issue 366
Doctor Who Magazine - The Fact of Fiction: Issue 366

Marvel Comics
Doctor Who Magazine - Time Team: Issue 401
Doctor Who Magazine - Time Team: Issue 401

Marvel Comics
Doctor Who DVD Files: Volume 99
Doctor Who DVD Files: Volume 99

GE Fabbri


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