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Tom Baker
City of Death
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Synopsis


Sightseeing in Paris, France
Sightseeing in Paris, France
 Whilst on holiday in Paris, The Doctor and Romana discover that something is amiss with time. Who is conducting the secret time experiments, and what connects them to the Mona Lisa?

 The answers lead them to discover a secret that has been hidden for four hundred million years…

Source: BBC DVD


General Information

Season: Seventeen
Production Code: 5H
Story Number: 105
Episode Numbers:510 - 513
Number of Episodes: 4
Percentage of Episodes Held:100%
Working Titles:"The Gamble with Time", "The Time of the Sephiroth" and "Curse of the Sephiroth"
Production Dates: April - June 1979
Broadcast Started: 29 September 1979
Broadcast Finished: 20 October 1979
Colour Status: Colour
Studio: Bray Studios, Slough and BBC Television Centre (TC3 and TC6)
Location: Paris, France: Louvre Museum, Rue de Rivoli; Denise René Gallery, Boulevard St Germain; Place du Petit Pont; Petit Pont; Eiffel Tower; Rue Vieille du Temple (No 47); Avenue des Champs Élysées; Avenue Kléber; Dupleix Métro Station; Boissière Metro Station, Avenue Kléber; Place de la Concorde; Trocadéro Metro Station, Place du Trocadéro; Rue de Rivoli and Boulevard de Grenelle.
Writer:David Agnew (Pseudonym for Graham Williams and Douglas Adams)
Director:Michael Hayes
Producer:Graham Williams
Script Editor:Douglas Adams
Editor:John Gregory
Production Assistant:Rosemary Crowson
Production Unit Manager:John Nathan-Turner
Assistant Floor Manager:Carol Scott
Designer:Richard McManan-Smith
Costume Designers:Doreen James and Jan Wright (Uncredited)
Make-Up Designer:Jean Steward
Cameraman:John Walker
Incidental Music:Dudley Simpson
Special Sounds (SFX Editor):Dick Mills
Studio Sounds:Anthony Philpott
Lighting:Mike Jefferies
Visual Effects:Ian Scoones
Title Sequence:Bernard Lodge
Title Music:Ron Grainer and the BBC Radiophonic Workshop. Arranged by Delia Derbyshire
Number of Doctors: 1
The Doctor: Tom Baker (The Fourth Doctor)
Number of Companions: 2The Companions: Lalla Ward (Romana 2) and David Brierley (voice only) (K9 Mk II) Guest Cast: Julian Glover (Scaroth / Count Scarlioni / Captain Tancredi), Eleanor Bron (Art Gallery Visitor), John Cleese (Art Gallery Visitor) Additional Cast: Catherine Schell (Countess Scarlioni), Tom Chadbon (Duggan), David Graham (Professor Kerensky), Kevin Flood (Hermann), Pamela Stirling (Louvre Guide), Peter Halliday (Soldier).Setting: Paris, France (1979), Florence, Italy (1505) and Earth (4 billion BC) Villain: Scaroth of the Jagaroth

The Episodes

No. Episodes Broadcast
(UK)
Duration Viewers
(Millions)
In Archive
510Part 129 September 197924'25"12.4PAL 2" colour videotape
511Part 206 October 197924'33"14.1PAL 2" colour videotape
512Part 313 October 197925'25"15.4PAL 2" colour videotape
513Part 420 October 197925'08"16.1PAL 2" colour videotape

Total Duration 1 Hour 40 Minutes


Audience Appreciation

Average Viewers (Millions) 14.5
Doctor Who Magazine Poll (1998)84.76%  (Position = 6 out of 159)
Doctor Who Magazine Poll (2003)1,060 Points (Position = 5 out of 159)
Doctor Who Magazine Poll (2009)88.20% Higher (Position = 8 out of 200)
Doctor Who Magazine Poll (2014)90.30% Higher (Position = 5 out of 241)


Archives


 All four episodes exist as PAL 2" colour videotapes.



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Notes


"City of Death" is considered by the majority of fans as being one of, if not the most, successful Doctor Who story in the show’s history. It was based on a submission from David Fisher but which was finally written by Script Editor Douglas Adams and Producer Graham Williams under the BBC pen name David Agnew.

This story is set in Paris, and was the first Doctor Who story to feature footage filmed on location in a foreign country.

The title is possibly a play-on-words of Cité de l'amour (City of Love, as Paris is often known), and Cité de la mort (City of Death), the pronunciation of which is very similar.

This is the second story to feature scenes set in the Louvre. It had previously appeared in its capacity as the royal residence of King Charles IX of France in the 1966 First Doctor story "The Massacre of St. Bartholomew's Eve". "City of Death" is also the show’s third story to take place primarily in and around Paris. The 1964 First Doctor story "The Reign of Terror" being the first.

Previously David Fisher had contributed two stories in Season Sixteen - "The Stones of Blood" and "The Androids of Tara". For this season he submitted two proposals. The first of these became "The Creature from the Pit" while the other, "The Gamble with Time", eventually became "City of Death". "A Gamble With Time", was set first in Las Vegas, then in Monte Carlo, during the 1920’s and was inspired by the Bulldog Drummond stories. David Fisher’s final submission for "A Gamble With Time" centred around Scarlioni, a member of the Sephiroth race, who had become fractured in time in an accident, and was mainly set in the year 1928 with The Doctor and Romana, aided by Drummond-esque detective "Pug" Farquharson, on the trail of the stolen Mona Lisa, pursuing Scarlioni from Paris to Monte Carlo where his partner, the Baroness Heidi, is using time travel technology to cheat at roulette at the casino to fund Scarlioni’s time travel experiments. Other settings included Paris in 1979, Leonardo Da Vinci’s studio in the year 1508 and prehistoric Earth.

When it was realised that the production team could afford to film on location in Paris with a stripped down crew a rewrite of David Fisher’s scripts had to be made to move the action to Paris and, for cost reasons, to drop the 1920s setting. K9 also had to be removed from the script as the cost of bringing the robot dog and his operators to Paris was prohibitive.

Because David Fisher was unable to perform the rewrites Script Editor Douglas Adams, aided by Producer Graham Williams, had to perform a complete rewrite of the story over the course of a weekend. The resulting story becoming "City of Death" and being credited to "David Agnew", a standard pseudonym used by the BBC and which had been previously used on Doctor Who for the 1978 story "The Invasion of Time". This in-house BBC alias was used to conceal the fact that both Doctor Who’s Producer and Script Editor had played a major role in writing the scripts, a practise frowned upon within the BBC at the time.

Julian Glover, who played Count Scarlioni, was a well established character actor who had previously appeared in Doctor Who as Richard the Lionheart in the 1965 First Doctor story "The Crusade". Julian Glover however, was reluctant to don the Jagaroth mask created for scenes where Scarlioni had shed his human disguise as he felt the mask would impede his performance. As a result, he is doubled by Richard Sheekey in many of these scenes.

Catherine Schell, who played the Countess, had previously appeared in the 1969 James Bond film "On Her Majesty's Secret Service". She also held regular roles in The Adventurer (1972-73) and season two of Space: 1999 (1975-78). She also played the part of Lady Claudine Lytton, in the 1975 film Pink Panther film "The Return of the Pink Panther" – a role which may have inspired her casting in "City of Death".

David Graham, who played Professor Kerensky, had previously provided Dalek voices in many of the First Doctor’s stories between 1963 and 1966 and had played the part of Charlie in the 1966 story "The Gunfighters". He had also voiced many of the characters in Gerry Anderson’s supermarionation series, most notably Thunderbirds in 1965.

Tom Chadbon, who played Duggan, was best known at the time for his role in The Liver Birds 1969–79; 1996. He would later return to the show in the role of Merdeen in the 1986 Sixth Doctor story "The Mysterious Planet" – the first story of the 1986 The Trial of a Time Lord season.

Peter Halliday, who played the part of a soldier, had previously appeared in the 1968 Second Doctor story "The Invasion" and the Third Doctor stories: "Doctor Who and the Silurians" (1970), "The Ambassadors of Death" (1970) and "Carnival of Monsters" (1973). He had also previously worked with Director Michael Hayes on the science fiction thriller A for Andromeda in 1961 and also starred in its 1962 sequel The Andromeda Breakthrough. He returned to Doctor Who as the Vicar in the 1988 Seventh Doctor story "Remembrance of the Daleks".

The two art critics, seen admiring the TARDIS in the Art Gallery, were played by Monty Python comedian John Cleese and well-known actress Eleanor Bron, who had been the first female cast member of the long-running Cambridge Footlights revue.

Douglas Adams knew John Cleese and Eleanor Bron through his connections with Monty Python and Cambridge Footlights and on learning that both would be working in BBC Television Centre on the day the art gallery scenes were to be recorded, he persuaded them to make a cameo appearance in this short but memorable scene.

As it happened, John Cleese was at the BBC Television Centre working on the final episode of Fawlty Towers. During recording, John Cleese and Tom Baker also recorded two short comedy skits for the BBC Christmas tape. Both John Cleese and Eleanor Bron agreed to take part on the condition that there was no pre-publicity regarding their appearance. They even both attempted to have their performances credited to pseudonyms, but this request was declined. This was John Cleese’s only appearance in the show whereas Eleanor Bron later returned to play Kara in the 1985 Sixth Doctor story "Revelation of the Daleks".

Douglas Adams appears in an uncredited cameo as a man having a drink in a bar.

K9 does not make an actual appearance in this story, but The Doctor is heard greeting him as he enters the TARDIS for his trip to visit Leonardo Da Vinci.

This story was the final Doctor Who story directed by Michael Hayes. Michael Hayes had previously directed the previous season’s "The Androids of Tara" and "The Armageddon Factor". He had also produced and directed A for Andromeda and had prior experience of filming in Paris having worked there on adaptations of Maigret (1960–63) and other Georges Simenon stories for the BBC. He subsequently worked on programmes such as All Creatures Great and Small and Skorpion before retiring during the Eighties.

Being the first story to be filmed primarily on location outside the United Kingdom the production team was plagued with many of the Parisian locations being closed due to a May Day holiday period which meant that many of the locations chosen for filming were closed, necessitating considerable improvisation on the part of the minimal crew and the three actors - Tom Baker, Lalla Ward and Tom Chadbon (who played Duggan).

Before commencing location shooting Head of Drama, Graeme McDonald, wrote to Graham Williams questioning why the adventure needed to be set in Paris in the first place, suggesting that the production would be much less complex if the action simply took place in the United Kingdom. Graham Williams responded by pointing out that as Scaroth’s plan hinges on the proximity of a priceless masterpiece - the Mona Lisa - no appropriate substitute could be found in the United Kingdom.

It has been reported that Tom Baker found filming in Paris to be a very different experience to what he was used to in the United Kingdom where crowds would gather to watch the filming and meet the stars. The cast and crew were largely ignored as Doctor Who was not shown in France at that time.

It has been reported that Lalla Ward found this story the most challenging Doctor Who story she had worked on but was pleased with the final outcome.

There was one major upset during the filming of this story. Seeing her costumes as an important part in creating the role of Romana, Lalla Ward clashed with Costume Designer Doreen James, rejecting the silver catsuit Doreen James had designed for her for this story. Lalla Ward instead came up with the idea for the schoolgirl costume.

This clash with the Costume Designer early on in the recording of this story ended Doreen James’ involvement with "City of Death" and with Doctor Who as a whole. At the conclusion of the first studio block, Doreen James informed Graham Williams that she was quitting the story and would not be returning to the show. She had been scheduled to design costumes for both "Nightmare of Eden" and "Shada" – stories due later in Season Seventeen. Her replacement for these later stories was Rupert Jarvis, while Jan Wright took over Doreen James’ duties, uncredited, for the final recording session of this story.

During this story it is revealed that all the Jagaroth, apart from Scaroth’s, were destroyed in a war 4 million years ago. The Jagaroth are warlike and callous, with knowledge of scanning, warp and holographic technology. Scaroth, attempting to take his ship into warp from Earth’s surface, was thrown into the time vortex, which resulted in him being split into twelve splinters (all in telepathic communication with each other). The twelve all landed in different times, led individual lives, and eventually died. Scaroth is recorded as an Egyptian god, and his lives include the Borgia serving Captain Tancredi, Count Carlos Scarlioni, a Norman soldier and an ancient Greek. All his selves have the same human face, a mask that can be ripped open down the middle and then instantly re created.

In the Virgin Book’s The Missing Adventures novel "The Sands of Time", the Fifth Doctor makes an offhand reference to Scaroth being involved in the construction of the pyramids in Egypt.

Romana is heard to state that she is 125 and so appears therefore to have picked up The Doctor’s vain habit of lying about her age as she stated she was 140 when she first met The Doctor in the 1978 story "The Ribos Operation".

The TARDIS can track the path of another time traveller. This ability was first seen in the 1965 First Doctor story "The Chase".

In the first episode, Romana makes a reference to a great art gallery called The Braxiatel Collection. The Virgin Books’ The New Adventures novel series would later expand on this, introducing the character Irving Braxiatel, a Time Lord. The first mention of The Braxiatel Collection appeared in "Theatre of War". Braxiatel also appears in the Bernice Summerfield series of novels and audio dramas as well as in the Gallifrey series of audio dramas.

The idea of making six copies of the Mona Lisa to be sold to private collectors, after the real Mona Lisa is stolen, bears a striking resemblance to an alleged exploit of Eduardo de Valfierno.

The Mona Lisa also played a key role in the fifth story of the third series of The Sarah Jane Adventures story, "Mona Lisa's Revenge". In this Doctor Who spin-off story one copy of the Mona Lisa comes alive and is then revealed to have been painted with paint made from sentient meteor rock.

It is revealed in the Big Finish Productions audio story "Dust Breeding" that The Doctor rescued one of the Mona Lisas for his own private collection.

When The Doctor uses his sonic screwdriver he is heard to state that he last used it against the Daleks on Skaro. It is also revealed that Romana has a sonic screwdriver and that Scaroth has a sonic knife - which he uses to remove the glass from in front of the Mona Lisa.

Strangely Professor Kerensky’s computer makes the same sound as WOTAN from the 1966 First Doctor story "The War Machines".

The Doctor is heard to state that he ‘reversed the polarity’ of Professor Kerensky’s machine. This phrase is usually associated with the Third Doctor, but is occasionally uttered by his other incarnations.

The Doctor has obviously visited Leonardo Da Vinci before.

The Doctor is heard stating that he has met William Shakespeare and that wrote at least one copy of Hamlet for him, after Shakespeare sprained his wrist writing sonnets. The Doctor is seen meeting William Shakespeare in the 2007 Tenth Doctor story "The Shakespeare Code".

Look out for the scene in episode four where Romana is seen wiring up a British three pin plug in order to connect Scaroth’s time equipment to the French mains - which only uses two pin plugs and sockets.

The sketch of Romana is different when it's seen outside the café from the one seen inside. It is also never revealed who is doing the sketch, and why. Interestingly in the Short Trips story "Notre Dame du Temps" (published by Big Finish Productions in "Short Trips 2: Companions"), the Seventh Doctor returns to Paris to pick up the picture of Romana that the artist discarded.

Despite the TARDIS still being equipped with a randomiser, the device The Doctor installed in order to throw The Black Guardian off their trail due to The Key to Time incident (see "The Armageddon Factor"). The Doctor is still able to steer the TARDIS as usual if he chooses, as is shown by his short trip to the year 1505 and then back to 1979.

This story’s broadcast occurred during the final weeks of an industrial dispute which had kept ITV - the BBC’s major competitor - completely off the air since August. As a result this story enjoyed phenomenally high ratings, averaging 14.5 million viewers and reaching a peak audience of 16.1 million for episode four. These were, and still are, the largest viewing figures ever attained by Doctor Who for an individual episode and a whole story. This story is also very highly rated in a number of fan polls.

This is one of four of the televised Doctor Who stories that were never novelised by Target Books as they were unable to come to an agreement with Douglas Adams that would have allowed him or another writer to adapt the script. Despite being a very popular story Douglas Adams commanded page rates well in excess of what Target was able to offer, and he also refused to let anyone else tackle the story. An unsanctioned fan novelisation was written in 1993, by David Lawrence. Titled "Doctor Who and the City of Death" it was first released on a not-for-profit basis by the New Zealand Doctor Who Fan Club. It was then re-released by TSV Books in New Zealand with a cover by Alistair Hughes. An official version of this story, written by James Goss, was finally published, by BBC Books, in April 2018.

Due to Douglas Adams’s influence, the script has his distinctive brand of humour and dialogue. Douglas Adams also reused part of this story’s plot, along with parts of the unfinished "Shada", for his 1987 novel "Dirk Gently's Holistic Detective Agency".

Ian Scoones’ storyboards for this story’s special effects sequences were published in Peter Haining’s book "Doctor Who – 25 Glorious Years" in 1988.

Footage of The Doctor from this story appears in the projection from the Cybermen’s datastamp in the 2008 Tenth Doctor story "The Next Doctor".

During broadcast of this story, Marvel Comics’ UK branch launched Doctor Who Weekly, which continues to this day, as the Doctor Who Magazine, to chronicle the Doctor Who franchise.

Also during broadcast of this story - on the 12th October 1979, between the second and third episodes - Douglas Adams’ famous novel "The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy" was first published.



First and Last

The Firsts:

 The first Doctor Who story to feature footage filmed on location in a foreign country.

 The first Doctor Who story to be watched by more than 14 million viewers.

 The first Doctor Who story to have an individual episode watched by more than 16 million viewers. This being the fourth episode.


The Lasts (Subject to Future Stories):

 The last Doctor Who story to be directed by Michael Hayes.


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The Plot

WARNING: May Contain SpoilersHide Text
Romana and The Doctor Admiring the Mona Lisa
Romana and The Doctor Admiring the Mona Lisa

The Doctor and Romana are enjoying a holiday in 1979 Paris when time starts to fracture around them. Despite this The Doctor is determined to continue their holiday. But during a visit to the Louvre, to see Leonardo Da Vinci’s Mona Lisa, time slips again and The Doctor is momentary dazed by the phenomenon.

He is helped by a Countess when he falls semi-conscious into her lap. The Doctor, however, takes this opportunity to slip a futuristic alien bracelet from Countess Scarlioni’s wrist that he has recognised is actually an alien scanner device.

Later, at a cafe, The Doctor and Romana meet a private detective, Duggan, who explains that he has been investigating the Countess’s husband, Count Scarlioni for some time, as he has placed a large number of lost art treasures on the market, and it is feared that the Scarlioni’s are intending to steal the Mona Lisa.

Romana and The Doctor in Paris
Romana and The Doctor in Paris

All three are then 'invited', at gunpoint, to visit the Count by a group of thugs. At the chateau Count Scarlioni locks them in his cellar and it is then that The Doctor discovers that he has six Mona Lisas stored there - all of them apparently originals!!

The Count is revealed to be an alien called Scaroth, the last member of the Jaggaroth race. The Count is actually wearing a mask beneath which are the cyclopean alien features of a Jaggaroth.

Romana and The Doctor
Romana and The Doctor

Scaroth was splintered in time when his ship exploded above primeval Earth and in his twelve aspects has since been guiding the development of mankind to a point where time travel is possible – hence the slippages in time felt earlier. Scaroth’s intention is to go back in time and prevent himself from destroying the ship. To finance the final stages of this project, overseen by the misguided scientist Professor Kerensky, he plans to steal the Mona Lisa from the Louvre and then secretly sell the multiple copies that one of his earlier splinters has forced Leonardo Da Vinci to paint.

The Doctor realises that the Scaroth must be prevented from carrying out his plan and so he uses his the TARDIS to travel back to 1505 and to the Florentine home of Leonardo Da Vinci. However, instead of meeting the famous painter The Doctor is caught by a soldier and introduced to Captain Tancredi - who The Doctor is shocked to discover looks identical to Count Scarlioni, and knows who The Doctor is.

The Doctor manages to escape but not before he discovers that it was a splinter of Scaroth who arranged for Leonardo Da Vinci to produce the six copies of the famous painting in the first place. To foil Scaroth’s plans he writes ‘This is a Fake’ in black marker pen on six canvasses, leaving the artist a note just to paint over them.

Count Scarlioni
Count Scarlioni

Back in present day Earth, The Doctor discovers that Scaroth has used the time machine that Professor Kerensky has built to travel back in time. The Doctor, along with Romana and Duggan, follow Scaroth in the TARDIS back 400 million years to primeval Earth so as to intercept him. They manage to catch up with him and Duggan punches Scaroth unconscious before he can stop his previous self from starting the ship, thereby preventing him from altering the course of time and so ensuring that history stays on its proper course.

They then watch from a safe distance as Scaroth’s ship attempts to take off his ship explodes, just as it did before, and the resultant blast of radiation brings life into being in the primordial swamps below, assuring the development of life on Earth that will eventually develop into mankind.

Returning to Paris in the present day, The Doctor and Romana discover that Scaroth’s unconscious body had returned there and that he had been killed by Count Scarlioni’s henchman Hermann. A failure in the time equipment also has set the chateau ablaze so destroying the copies of the Mona Lisa.

The Doctor and Romana then say farewell to Duggan at the top of the Eiffel Tower. A few moments later they wave up to him from the ground below, before running off into the distance.

 
The Countess
The Countess
Count Scarlioni with his Manservant Hermann
Count Scarlioni with his Manservant Hermann
The Fake Mona Lisa's in Count Scarlioni's Crypt
The Fake Mona Lisa's in Count Scarlioni's Crypt
Scaroth in his True Form
Scaroth in his True Form
 
Duggan
Duggan
Professor Kerensky in the Time Manipulator
Professor Kerensky in the Time Manipulator
Art Critics at the Louvre
Art Critics at the Louvre
The Jagaroth Ship Lands on Prehistoric Earth
The Jagaroth Ship Lands on Prehistoric Earth




Quote of the Story


 'I am Scaroth. Me, together in one. The Jagaroth shall live through me. Together we have pushed this puny race of Humans, shaped their paltry destiny to meet our ends. Soon we shall be. The centuries that divide me shall be undone.'

Count Scarlioni



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Release Information

FormatTitleRelease Date (UK)Code NumberCover ArtRemarks
Video
VHS
City of DeathJuly 1991BBCV 4492Andrew Skilleter
Video
VHS
The Tom Baker YearsSeptember 1992BBCV 4839PhotoClip only Introduced and commented on by Tom Baker Double cassette release
Video
VHS
City of DeathMay 2001BBCV 7132Re-released version
Video
DVD
City of DeathNovember 2005BBCDVD 1664Photo-montage
Audio
CD
City of DeathDecember 2012Photo-montageNarrated by Lalla Ward (Romana)
Audio
CD
Classic TV Adventures - Collection TwoOctober 2017Photo-montagePart of the "Classic TV Adventures Collection Two" Box Set Narrated by Lalla Ward (Romana)
Audio
LP
City of DeathApril 2018Photo-montageLimited Edition Double LP - Narrated by Lalla Ward (Romana)


In Print

FormatTitleRelease Date (UK)PublisherAuthorCover ArtRemarks
Novel
Novel
City of DeathMay 2015BBC BooksDouglas Adams and James GossISBN: 978-184990-675-3
CD
CD
City of DeathMay 2015BBC AudioDouglas Adams and James GossAudio version of the BBC Books novel read by Lalla Ward (Romana).
Novel
Novel
City of DeathApril 2018BBC BooksDouglas Adams and James GossPhoto-montageTarget Collection. ISBN: 978-1-78594327-0
Doctor Who CMS Magazine (In Vision)Issue 40 (Released: November 1992)
Doctor Who Monthly - ArchiveIssue 61 (Released: February 1982)
Doctor Who Magazine - ArchiveIssue 205 (Released: October 1993)
Doctor Who Magazine - The Fact of FictionIssue 350 (Released: December 2004)
Doctor Who Magazine - Time TeamIssue 365 (Released: February 2006)
Doctor Who DVD FilesVolume 37 (Released: June 2010)

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Photo Gallery


The Doctor and Companions

 
Tom Baker
The Fourth Doctor

   

Lalla Ward
Romana 2
 
David Brierley (voice only)
K9 Mk II
   




On Release

VHS Video Cover
VHS Video Cover

BBC
VIDEO
Tom Baker Years VHS Video Cover
Tom Baker Years VHS Video Cover

BBC
VIDEO
Re-released VHS Video Cover
Re-released VHS Video Cover

BBC
VIDEO
DVD Cover
DVD Cover

BBC
VIDEO
   
Soundtrack CD Cover
Soundtrack CD Cover

BBC
AUDIO
Classic TV Adventures Collection Two CD Cover
Classic TV Adventures Collection Two CD Cover

BBC
AUDIO
Soundtrack Vinyl Cover
Soundtrack Vinyl Cover

Demon Records
AUDIO



In Print

BBC Book Cover
BBC Book Cover

BBC
NOVEL
Audio CD Cover
Audio CD Cover

BBC
CD
BBC Books Target Collection Cover
BBC Books Target Collection Cover

BBC
NOVEL
   


Magazines

Doctor Who CMS Magazine (In Vision): Issue 40
Doctor Who CMS Magazine (In Vision): Issue 40

CMS
Doctor Who Monthly - Archive: Issue 61
Doctor Who Monthly - Archive: Issue 61

Marvel Comics
Doctor Who Magazine - Archive: Issue 205
Doctor Who Magazine - Archive: Issue 205

Marvel Comics
   
Doctor Who Magazine - The Fact of Fiction: Issue 350
Doctor Who Magazine - The Fact of Fiction: Issue 350

Marvel Comics
Doctor Who Magazine - Time Team: Issue 365
Doctor Who Magazine - Time Team: Issue 365

Marvel Comics
Doctor Who DVD Files: Volume 37
Doctor Who DVD Files: Volume 37

GE Fabbri
   

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