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Sylvester McCoy
Dragonfire
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Synopsis


The Doctor, Glitz, Mel and Ace
The Doctor, Glitz, Mel and Ace
 Iceworld. An intergalactic trading post, ruled by the power-hungry Kane. Now his dream of total power is near to realisation with his acquisition of a band of mercenaries from the infamous Glitz in part payment of his debts. For "Cryosleep" will render the men utterly in his power. Meanwhile, Glitz still owes the balance of the debt and looks to Iceworld's mythical dragon and the Dragonfire - the treasure it reputedly guards - to solve his problems at last.

 Intrigued by the legend of the Dragonfire, The Doctor, Mel and young Earth girl, Ace, accompany Glitz - unaware that they are being followed by Kane's mercenaries. For the psychotic ruler believes that with the Dragonfire in his possession he can avenge the rulers of his home-planet who banished his long-dead partner 3,000 years ago.

 And so it seems that beneath Iceworld's superficial civility lies a frozen core of corruption and The Doctor has embarked on something far more sinister than a mere treasure hunt...

Source: BBC VHS Video


General Information

Season: Twenty Four
Production Code: 7G
Story Number: 147
Episode Numbers:665 - 667
Number of Episodes: 3
Percentage of Episodes Held:100%
Working Titles:"Absolute Zero", "The Pyramid's Treasure" and "Pyramid in Space"
Production Dates: July - August 1987
Broadcast Started: 23 November 1987
Broadcast Finished: 07 December 1987
Colour Status: Colour
Studio: BBC Television Centre (TC1 and TC3)
Location: None
Writer:Ian Briggs
Director:Chris Clough
Producer:John Nathan-Turner
Script Editor:Andrew Cartmel
Production Assistants:Karen King and Rosemary Parsons
Production Associate:Anne Faggetter
Assistant Floor Manager:Christopher Sandeman
Designer:John Asbridge
Costume Designer:Richard Croft
Make-Up Designer:Gillian Thomas
Incidental Music:Dominic Glynn
Special Sounds (SFX Editor):Dick Mills
Studio Sounds:Brian Clark
Lighting:Don Babbage
Visual Effects:Andy McVean
Title Sequence:Oliver Elmes
Title Music:Ron Grainer and the BBC Radiophonic Workshop. Arranged by Keff McCulloch
Number of Doctors: 1
The Doctor: Sylvester McCoy (The Seventh Doctor)
Number of Companions: 2The Companions: Bonnie Langford (Melanie Bush) (Departs) and Sophie Aldred (Ace) (Joins) Number of Acquaintances: 1The Acquaintance: Tony Selby (Sabalom Glitz) (Rejoins and Departs) Additional Cast: Edward Peel (Kane), Patricia Quinn (Belazs), Tony Osoba (Kracauer), Shirin Taylor (Customer), Ian Mackenzie (Anderson), Stephanie Fayerman (McLuhan), Stuart Organ (Bazin), Sean Blowers (Zed), Nigel Miles-Thomas (Pudovkin), Leslie Meadows (The Creature), Lynn Gardner (Announcer), Miranda Borman (Stellar), Daphne Oxenford (Archivist), Chris MacDonnell (Arnheim)Setting: Iceworld (far future). Villain: Kane

The Episodes

No. Episodes Broadcast
(UK)
Duration Viewers
(Millions)
In Archive
665Part 123 November 198724'01"5.5PAL 1" colour videotape
666Part 230 November 198724'40"5.0PAL 1" colour videotape
667Part 307 December 198724'26"4.7PAL 1" colour videotape

Total Duration 1 Hour 13 Minutes


Audience Appreciation

Average Viewers (Millions) 5.1
Doctor Who Magazine Poll (1998)58.49%  (Position = 126 out of 159)
Doctor Who Magazine Poll (2009)52.86% Lower (Position = 186 out of 200)
Doctor Who Magazine Poll (2014)57.60% Higher (Position = 215 out of 241)


Archives


 All three episodes exist as PAL 1" colour videotapes. A 71-edit scratch print of all episodes also exists.



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Notes


"Dragonfire" was the fourth and final story of Season Twenty Four and it marked the final appearances of Melanie Bush and Sabalom Glitz, and featured the debut of Sophie Aldred as Ace.

Ian Briggs was the third Season Twenty Four writer to originate from the BBC’s Script Unit. He was preceded by Stephen Wyatt (who wrote "Paradise Towers") and Malcolm Kohll (who wrote "Delta and the Bannermen"). Ian Briggs was invited to submit ideas for Doctor Who by script editor Andrew Cartmel, in early 1987, but his initial ideas were rejected as it was felt that they were too clichéd.

To save money, John Nathan-Turner had decided that the final six episodes of this season should comprise two three-part stories, both made by the same production team and treated essentially as a single story. One story would be made entirely on location ("Delta and the Bannermen") while the other ("Dragonfire" would be entirely studio-bound. Also one would be more be humorous in tone while the other would have a more serious bent.

Ian Briggs was therefore asked to write something comic which could be made solely in the studio. He composed a revised storyline, entitled "Absolute Zero", about a fourteen year-old financial genius and his sidekick, Mr Spewey, who seek a treasure that is revealed to be a living creature in the depths of an ice planet.

Andrew Cartmel was happy with the core of Ian Briggs’ idea, but disliked its more overtly farcical elements, especially since the story that became "Delta and the Bannermen" was turning out to be rather comedic itself. Ian Briggs was therefore asked to redraft his plot. Ian Briggs had now set the story on a frozen pyramid-shaped space station. Because of the logistical problems with this concept, though, the Pyramid became the more easily achievable Iceworld on Svartos (originally called Tartros).

This story was originally designed as a much darker piece with allegories to Nazi Germany (although apparently not including the Ice Warriors, a much-heralded rumour at the time).

It was during the beginning of the recording of this story that Bonnie Langford informed John Nathan-Turner that this was to be her final Doctor Who story. Bonnie Langford would later make a brief return for the Thirtieth-Anniversary Children In Need special "Dimensions in Time", in 1993. She then returned to the role of Melanie for Big Finish Productions in the Doctor Who audio stories starting with "The Fires of Vulcan", written by Steve Lyons. The character of Melanie would also be dealt with by Steve Lyons in Virgin Books’ The New Adventures novels as a postscript to her role, having spent a little time with Glitz before being abandoned on a distant planet. Bonnie Langford also played an alternate universe version of Melanie in the Doctor Who Unbound audio story "He Jests at Scars...".

Due to the uncertainty of exactly when Bonnie Langford would be leaving the show, coupled with John Nathan-Turner’s desire to have at least story with both Melanie and her replacement, both Ian Briggs and Malcolm Kohll were asked to include a strong female character in their stories who could serve as a potential new companion.

John Nathan-Turner and Andrew Cartmel had already put together an outline for a new female companion, nicknamed Alf, to possibly replace Melanie. Alf was a tough, streetwise Eighties teenager who was whisked away from Earth to a distant galaxy by a time storm.

Ian Briggs drew heavily from the outline for Alf in conceiving a character he christened ‘Ace’ - a name derived from the slang used by teenagers from Perivale who were studying drama under him. In the event that Ace was not retained by the production crew - which seemed increasingly likely, as "Delta and the Bannermen" appeared to be the preferred choice to end the season, meaning that Malcolm Kohll’s creation Ray would probably be the new companion - Ian Briggs structured the ending of his story so that Ace would depart Iceworld alongside his pirate character Razorback (also called Swordfish).

Rather than replace Ace with their own creation, Alf, it was decided to stick with Ian Briggs’ character, on the condition that Ian Briggs sign away any claim to Ace thereby avoiding the onerous rights issues which had arisen with Nyssa, who had been created by Johnny Byrne in the 1981 Fourth Doctor story "The Keeper of Traken". Therefore Ian Briggs re-wrote this story’s final scene so that Ace now joined The Doctor in the TARDIS and Melanie left with Glitz. This also meant that "Dragonfire" became the final story of Season Twenty Four.

It is revealed that Ace’s real name is Dorothy, she is sixteen years old, comes from Perivale (a small suburb in the London Borough of Ealing, West of London) and is aggressive when asked about her parents. She enjoyed chemistry at school, and seemed to be on the verge of doing her 'A' levels when she was suspended for blowing up the art room, which she felt was creative act. A brief reference is made to the ‘time storm’ that swept her up and brought her to Iceworld Ace’s origins, and reasons for coming to Iceworld, however, would only be fully explained two years later in "The Curse of Fenric".

Ian Briggs had stated in Ace’s character outline for this story that she had slept with Glitz on Iceworld. The plot point was, unsurprisingly, not included in the story as shot. The Virgin Books’ The New Adventures novel "Love and War", written by Paul Cornell, implies (and his later novel "Happy Endings" confirms) that Ace also lost her virginity to Glitz.

The Doctor’s acceptance of Ace as a companion is part of a larger game that would see its culmination in "The Curse of Fenric". In the Virgin Books’ The New Adventures novel "Head Games", written by Steve Lyons, it is revealed that the Seventh Doctor mentally influenced the brighter and more idealistic Melanie to leave so that he could become the darker and more manipulative Time’s Champion.

A major source of inspiration for this story was the 1939 MGM film The Wizard of Oz. Ace’s character was strongly inspired by Judy Garland’s performance as Dorothy Gale in this film especially with her real name being Dorothy (indeed, Ian Briggs’ notes on Ace indicated that her surname was actually Gale, although this was never stated onscreen) and her being whisked off to Iceworld in a time storm. Inspiration also came from Twentieth Century Fox’s Alien saga (the ANT hunt in the third episode, and the physical look of the dragon).

Ace was not the only element in this story to reference the world of cinema. At one point, the name of the chief villain would have been called Hess, but this was changed due to the announcement that the Soviet government, under Gorbachev, was no longer opposed to the release of Nazi war criminal Rudolf Hess on humanitarian grounds, and then the announcement of his death by suicide in Spandau Prison, Berlin. The name was changed to Kane, after the ruthless Charles Foster Kane from the 1941 movie Citizen Kane. The name of Kane’s former accomplice, Krylla, was correspondingly altered to Xana, after Xanadu, the name of Kane’s estate in the same film.

Movies also gave rise to the Iceworld cafeteria (inspired by the Mos Eisley cantina in 1977’s Star Wars) and the holographic messages from the dead (which mirror Jor El’s message to his son in the 1978 Superman). The name of Razorback’s spaceship and the manner of Kane’s death both came from the 1922 horror film Nosferatu, Eine Symphonie Des Grauens (Nosferatu, A Symphony of Horror). Ian Briggs found further inspiration in the 1979 movie Alien and the 1941 version of The Maltese Falcon.

Another change was in Ace’s relationship with Kane. Originally, Ace would join Kane as a mercenary, his sovereign becoming permanently imprinted on her palm in return. She would turn against him only when ordered to kill Melanie. A stuffed dog companion for Ace, called Wayne, was also deleted from the storyline. Ian Briggs had also maintained The Doctor’s trait of mixing up proverbs, devised by Pip and Jane Baker for the Seventh Doctor’s introductory story, "Time and The Rani". By now, however, it had been decided to tone down some of the more overtly comical aspects of the Seventh Doctor’s personality, and so these were removed.

The actress cast as Ace had not originally sought out the part at all. Sophie Aldred had mainly appeared in cabaret and children’s theatre when she auditioned for the role of Ray in "Delta and the Bannermen", principally on the strength that she could ride a motorcycle (Ray was required to ride a scooter). Instead, she was selected as Ace, and informed of the possibility that she might become a companion. Around the same time, Sophie Aldred was also hired as a host for the children’s programme Corners.

Although Ace is sixteen, actress Sophie Aldred was in fact nearly ten years older at the time she started playing this part.

The actress who won the role of Ray, Lynn Gardner, subsequently injured herself in a fall while practising on a scooter. She was therefore replaced by Sara Griffiths, but Ian Briggs created the role of the Iceworld announcer for Lynn Gardner to make up for losing the part of Ray.

The use of the Sabalom Glitz was an afterthought and came about when it was realised that there was considerable similarity between Razorback and the roguish Glitz, who had appeared in "The Mysterious Planet" and "The Ultimate Foe" - the first four and final two episodes, of The Trial of a Time Lord season long storyline, from the previous year. The director assigned to this story, Chris Clough, had also helmed the latter, and so he secured actor Tony Selby’s services for a third, and final, performance as Glitz. Ian Briggs therefore rewrote his scripts for the somewhat more congenial character.

Tony Osoba (who played the part of Kracauer) had previously appeared in the 1979 Fourth Doctor story "Destiny of the Daleks".

John Alderton was considered for the part of Kane, but ultimately wasn’t available for the role and so this part was played by Edward Peel.

This story features a guest appearance by Patricia Quinn (playing the part of Belazs). Patricia Quinn is more famous for her lips in the 1975 film The Rocky Horror Picture Show.

Because Ian Briggs’ early drafts had been extremely lengthy Andrew Cartmel’ had to edit them to bring them down to size. However, despite this all three episodes still needed extensive editing in post-production. Fortunately, few significant sequences ended up on the cutting room floor. The major exception was a pair of scenes, in the first episode, in which Glitz accidentally triggers a trap in the corridors beneath Iceworld, and must be rescued by The Doctor. An episode three cut meant the loss of a mention (by the PA announcer) of an Iceworld customer named Joanne Foxley - this being a reference to one of the girls upon which Briggs had modelled Ace’s personality.

Ace’s first appearance begins her habit of calling The Doctor ‘Professor’. The Doctor corrects her in this story, but afterwards rarely objects to her continuous use of the name over the next two seasons.

One of the alien customers in the cafe is an Argolin from the 1980 Fourth Doctor story "The Leisure Hive".

In one scene, The Doctor distracts a guard by engaging him in a philosophical conversation. One of the guard’s lines, about the ‘semiotic thickness of a performed text’. This is a quotation from the 1983 media studies volume "Doctor Who – The Unfolding Text", written by John Tulloch and Manuel Alverado. It has been revealed that Script Editor Andrew Cartmel encouraged his writers to read this book to help acquaint themselves with the show’s history and it was this which inspired Ian Briggs to quote the academic text in his script, in a playful self-reference.

In the scene where The Doctor, Glitz, Melanie and Ace talk over the different places in Iceworld, Glitz mentions the surname of The Doctor’s actor.

It is revealed that The Doctor’s TARDIS contains star charts.

The patches Ace has on her jacket are of various Space Shuttle missions.

This story has the infamous literal ‘cliffhanger’ scene at the end of the first episode which comes under frequent criticism for its seeming absurdity. In the script, this was to show The Doctor reaching the end of a passage and - with nowhere else to go - attempting unsuccessfully to climb down the sheer ice wall using his umbrella. Unfortunately, in the scene that was recorded the passageway does not clearly come to an end, thereby losing any rationale for The Doctor’s seemingly bizarre decision to dangle over the abyss from his umbrella.

For the effects shot of the death of Kane, a wax bust of the actor’s screaming face was made and filmed being melted down to a skull within, this footage being sped up to achieve the effect. Though this is very similar to the death of Toht in Raiders of the Lost Ark, for the family audience of Doctor Who the colour red was carefully avoided in the bust.

This story marks the only farewell scene between the Seventh Doctor and one of his companions. Melanie’s departure scene was adapted from Sylvester McCoy’s screen test, where Janet Fielding was hired to act as a departing companion and a villain. Sylvester McCoy has stated that he always liked that particular screen test script and he lobbied for its inclusion in "Dragonfire".

Melanie joins a long line of companions who leave The Doctor after developing a relationship with someone in their final story. Others have included Susan, Vicki, Jo Grant and Leela.

This is the second story in a row to feature a vehicle, full of passengers, exploding and killing everyone on it. In "Delta and the Bannermen" it was a bus; in this story it is Glitz’s spaceship.

This story contains a number of errors. Namely: at the end of episode one, The Doctor looks down an almost bottomless cliff of ice. By the start of the next episode a little ledge has appeared, onto which Glitz is able to pull The Doctor; In episode two, when Ace throws Nitro 9 at the ‘zombies’, the ‘rock face’ behind her is obviously a billowing white curtain, rather than a solid block of ice; Why hide the Dragonfire on the part of the planet that Kane can get to?; Why does Kane kill his mercenaries, having gone to the trouble of collecting them?; At the end, why doesn’t Stella’s mother behave as if there’s been a massacre and would Glitz’s spacecraft really have seat belts and furry dice?

During the first studio recording day the TARDIS scenes for "Delta and the Bannermen" were also recorded as this was the only studio material required for that production.

"Dragonfire" was touted as the 150th Doctor Who story. It is actually the 147th broadcast, although the BBC promoted it as the 150th. The production team apparently arrived at the total by counting the four segments of Season Twenty Three’s The Trial of a Time Lord as four separate stories. Additionally this is the 148th produced (as the Season Seventeen story "Shada" was not completed).



First and Last

The Firsts:

 The introduction of companion Ace played by Sophie Aldred.

 The first Doctor Who story to be written by Ian Briggs.


The Lasts (Subject to Future Stories):

 The last story of Season Twenty Four.

 Bonnie Langford's last story as Melanie Bush.

 The last appearance in the show for Sabalom Glitz played by Tony Selby.


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The Plot

WARNING: May Contain SpoilersHide Text
The Doctor in the TARDIS
The Doctor in the TARDIS

The Doctor and his travelling companion, Melanie Bush, visit Iceworld, a space trading colony on the dark side of the planet Svartos - The Doctor having decided to go there to investigate a tracking signal that has been picked up by the TARDIS. The TARDIS materialises in a refrigeration sales section and in a nearby restaurant they meet Sabalom Glitz, who has come to Iceworld in search of treasure with the aid of a map. A waitress nicknamed Ace tells them about a mythical dragon that is supposed to live in the lower levels. The Doctor and Glitz therefore decide to go and hunt for both the treasure and the dragon.

In charge of Iceworld is Kane, a cold-blooded, callous and vindictive criminal who has been exiled from his home planet of Proamon three thousand years earlier. Kane’s body temperature is so cold that one touch from him can kill and in his lair is a freezer cabinet into which Kane deposits himself when he needs to cool down. Kane also buys supporters and employees and makes them wear his mark iced in to their flesh. Kane has bought Glitz’s crew from him and has cryogenically frozen them, this process wiping their minds and turning them into his obedient fighting force. Glitz though is unaware that Kane had arranged for him to obtain the map, which has a tracking device hidden in the seal, as he wants the dragon found for his own reasons.

Melanie is forced to stay with Ace in the restaurant, when The Doctor and Glitz set off, as Glitz objects to her accompanying them. It is though only a matter of time before the young, rebellious waitress behaves appallingly to customers and is fired. Ace takes Melanie to her room where Melanie is stunned to hear that Ace is a human from late twentieth century Earth who only arrived on Iceworld after a bizarre chemistry experiment caused a time-storm in her bedroom. The two girls then hear an announcement over a loudspeaker system about an ice block at the docking bay. Ace decides to go and help clear it by blowing up the docking bay door with a can of her home-made nitro-9 explosive. This results in Ace and Melanie being arrested by Officer Belazs.

In the Cafeteria
In the Cafeteria

They are taken to Kane who tries in vain to seduce Ace into joining his mercenary force. The two girls then manage to escape into the tunnels of Iceworld. As they navigate the tunnels Ace and Melanie encounter the dragon, which fires laser bolts at them. But in fact the dragon is defending them as the dragon is aiming at Kane’s cryogenically altered soldiers who have been sent into the ice caverns to kill the two girls.

The Doctor and Glitz have meanwhile become separated. The Doctor climbs over a railing and hangs from his umbrella over an apparently sheer drop. Glitz finds him hanging there and helps him down. He then offers a deal: if The Doctor will help him recover his spaceship, the Nosferatu, he can have the treasure map. The Doctor agrees. Meanwhile Belazs plots with Kracauer to kill Kane by raising the temperature of Iceworld. This though fails and Kane kills both of them instead.

Ace
Ace

In the tunnels, The Doctor and Glitz encounter the dragon, which gestures for them to follow it. Along the way they meet up with Ace and Melanie, and also Pudovkin, one of Glitz’ former crew, who is killed by the dragon. The dragon takes them to a control in the ice caverns where it shows The Doctor, Glitz, Ace and Melanie a poly-dimensional scanning imager. A pre-recorded hologram of an archivist appears and he tells of Kane being exiled from Proamon and banished to the cold, dark side of Svartos. The dragon’s head then opens to reveal a crystal crackling with power. The Doctor realises that the dragon, a biomechanoid, is itself the treasure. The crystal acts as the key that Kane needs in order to free himself from exile. The dragon is thus both Kane’s jailer and his chance of freedom.

They are unaware though that Kane is listening to everything being said, via the tracking device in the seal of the map. What Kane hears makes him happy as after three thousand years, Dragonfire will be his. Kane orders his troops to eliminate the dragon and bring its head to him. He also revives all the mercenaries and orders them to spread terror throughout Iceworld, herding everyone onto the Nosferatu as he wants Iceworld cleared.

As McLuhan and Bazin hunt for the dragon, Glitz heads back to the Nosferatu to obtain some explosives. He arrives just too late to board his spaceship and witnesses it taking off. But then it explodes in space, having being detonated by Kane, killing everyone aboard.

The Doctor
The Doctor

When McLuhan and Bazin eventually find the dragon the kill it. But when they try and remove the crystal, they are electrocuted by the power within it. Soon afterwards The Doctor and Melanie find the dead dragon and are able to remove the crystal, as its power has now been diminished. They then meet up with Glitz at Ace’s room, and on discovering Ace missing, they head for Kane’s headquarters.

There they discover that Ace has been captured by Kane, when she had earlier returned to her room to get some more nitro-9. Kane though is willing to swap Ace for the Dragonfire crystal, which he needs to power his equipment and enable him to return to Proamon to take his revenge on those who exiled him. Melanie therefore places the crystal in the circuit and the equipment powers up. It is then that they discover that Iceworld is a spacecraft, as it takes off from the surface of Svartos.

The Doctor reveals to Kane that Proamon no longer exists as it was destroyed two thousand years ago when its sun turned supernova. Realising that The Doctor is telling the truth Kane despairingly opens a viewing port, allowing bright unfiltered hot sunlight to flood into the control room - so causing him to melt away in the glare.

With Kane killed, Glitz takes control of Iceworld and renames it the Nosferatu II. Melanie decides to stay with Glitz, so as to keep him out of trouble, instead of continuing her travels with The Doctor. With the departure of Melanie, The Doctor asks Ace if she would like to go with him in the TARDIS, taking the scenic route back to her home in Perivale. She accepts his offer and so The Doctor loses one travelling companion but gains another.

 
The Doctor, Glitz, Mel and Ace
The Doctor, Glitz, Mel and Ace
Waiting
Waiting
The Dragon
The Dragon
The Dragon and The Doctor
The Dragon and The Doctor
 
Meeting Kane
Meeting Kane
The End of Kane
The End of Kane
Goodbye Mel, Welcome Ace
Goodbye Mel, Welcome Ace
Ace and The Doctor
Ace and The Doctor




Quote of the Story


 'Do you feel like arguing with a can of deodorant that registers nine on the Richter scale?'

Ace



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Release Information

FormatTitleRelease Date (UK)Code NumberCover ArtRemarks
Audio
Tape
Black Light: The Doctor Who Music of Dominic Glynn1988RDMP2Music score
Audio
CD
30 Years at the Radiophonic Workshop1993BBC CD 871Photo-montageSound effects
Video
VHS
DragonfireJanuary 1994BBCV 5181Bruno Elettori
Video
DVD
DragonfireMay 2012BBCDVD 3387Part of the "Ace Adventures" Box Set Released along with "The Happiness Patrol"
Audio
CD
The 50th Anniversary CollectionDecember 2013Photo-montageOriginal Television Soundtracks
Video
Blu-Ray
Doctor Who: The Collection - Season 24 (Limited Edition)June 2021BBCBD 0520Photo-montageBlu-Ray Limited Edition boxed set containing 4 specially restored stories


In Print

FormatTitleRelease Date (UK)PublisherAuthorCover ArtRemarks
Novel
Novel
DragonfireMarch 1989Target No. 137Ian BriggsAlister PearsonISBN: 0-426-20322-4
Novel
Novel
DragonfireNovember 1991Target No. 137Ian BriggsAlister PearsonVirgin new cover reprint.
ISBN: 0-426-20322-4
CD
CD
DragonfireDecember 2019Target No. 137Ian BriggsAlister PearsonAudio version of the Target Novel read by Bonnie Langford (Melanie Bush).
Doctor Who CMS Magazine (In Vision)Issue 94 (Released: January 2001)
Doctor Who Magazine - After ImageIssue 135 (Released: April 1988)
Doctor Who Magazine - ArchiveIssue 255 (Released: August 1997)
Doctor Who Magazine - Time TeamIssue 404 (Released: February 2009)
Doctor Who Magazine - The Fact of FictionIssue 444 (Released: March 2012)
Doctor Who DVD FilesVolume 123 (Released: September 2013)

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Photo Gallery


The Doctor and Companions/Acquaintance

 
Sylvester McCoy
The Seventh Doctor

   

Tony Selby
Sabalom Glitz
Bonnie Langford
Melanie Bush
Sophie Aldred
Ace
   




On Release

Audio Tape - Black Light
Audio Tape - Black Light

BBC
AUDIO
Sound Effects CD Cover
Sound Effects CD Cover

BBC
AUDIO
VHS Video Cover
VHS Video Cover

BBC
VIDEO
   
Ace Adventures Box Set DVD Cover
Ace Adventures Box Set DVD Cover

BBC
VIDEO
The 50th Anniversary Collection Cover
The 50th Anniversary Collection Cover

BBC
AUDIO
The Collection Season 24 Limited Edition Blu-Ray Cover
The Collection Season 24 Limited Edition Blu-Ray Cover

BBC
VIDEO
   


In Print

Target Book Cover
Target Book Cover

Target
NOVEL
Reprinted Virgin Book Cover
Reprinted Virgin Book Cover

Virgin
NOVEL
Target Audio CD Cover
Target Audio CD Cover

BBC
CD
   


Magazines

Doctor Who CMS Magazine (In Vision): Issue 94
Doctor Who CMS Magazine (In Vision): Issue 94

CMS
Doctor Who Magazine - After Image: Issue 135
Doctor Who Magazine - After Image: Issue 135

Marvel Comics
Doctor Who Magazine - Archive: Issue 255
Doctor Who Magazine - Archive: Issue 255

Marvel Comics
   
Doctor Who Magazine - Time Team: Issue 404
Doctor Who Magazine - Time Team: Issue 404

Marvel Comics
Doctor Who Magazine - The Fact of Fiction: Issue 444
Doctor Who Magazine - The Fact of Fiction: Issue 444

Marvel Comics
Doctor Who DVD Files: Volume 123
Doctor Who DVD Files: Volume 123

GE Fabbri
   

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