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Tom Baker
Destiny of the Daleks
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Synopsis


Davros and the Daleks
Davros and the Daleks
 Accompanied by the newly regenerated Romana, The Doctor lands on a mystery planet intrigued by the evidence of drilling taking place there, deep underground.

 The discoveries he makes are chilling. For the planet is Skaro and the Daleks are in charge of the operation. But just what are his old enemies searching for? And why?

 Perhaps the answers lie with the Movellans, a beautiful humanoid race led by Commander Sharrel. They are waging a war of their own with the Daleks and the situation is now stalemate. Should The Doctor tip the balance of power to aid the Daleks' ultimate destruction? Or are their intentions no less sinister than the Daleks' themselves?

 Suddenly The Doctor finds himself enmeshed in a deadly battle which could result in the destruction of the universe itself as, once more, he summons the strength to face an all too familiar, timelessly evil adversary.

Source: BBC VHS Video


General Information

Season: Seventeen
Production Code: 5J
Story Number: 104
Episode Numbers:506 - 509
Number of Episodes: 4
Percentage of Episodes Held:100%
Production Dates: June - July 1979
Broadcast Started: 01 September 1979
Broadcast Finished: 22 September 1979
Colour Status: Colour
Studio: BBC Visual Effects Department and BBC Television Centre (TC1 and TC3)
Location: Winspit Quarry (Worth Matravers, Dorset), Binnegar Heath Sand Pit (Wareham, Dorset) and KJP Trading (Western Avenue, Acton).
Writer:Terry Nation
Director:Ken Grieve
Producer:Graham Williams
Script Editor:Douglas Adams
Editor:Dick Allen
Production Assistant:Henry Foster
Production Unit Manager:John Nathan-Turner
Assistant Floor Managers:Anthony Root and David Tilley
Designer:Ken Ledsham
Costume Designer:June Hudson
Make-Up Designer:Cecile Hay-Arthur
Cameramen:Fred Hamilton, Kevin Rowley and Philip Law
Incidental Music:Dudley Simpson
Special Sounds (SFX Editor):Dick Mills
Studio Sounds:Clive Gifford
Lighting:John Dixon
Visual Effects:Peter Logan
Title Sequence:Bernard Lodge
Title Music:Ron Grainer and the BBC Radiophonic Workshop. Arranged by Delia Derbyshire
Daleks Originally Created By: Terry Nation
Number of Doctors: 1
The Doctor: Tom Baker (The Fourth Doctor)
Number of Companions: 2The Companions: Lalla Ward (Romana 2) (Joins) and David Brierley (voice only) (K9 Mk II) Additional Cast: David Gooderson (Davros), Tim Barlow (Tyssan), Suzanne Danielle (Agella), Peter Straker (Commander Sharrel), Tony Osoba (Lan), Cy Town (Dalek Operator), Mike Mugarvan (Dalek Operator), Roy Skelton (Dalek Voice), Penny Casdagli (Jall), David Yip (Veldan), Cassandra (Movellan Guard)Setting: Skaro Villains: Daleks, Davros and The Movellans

The Episodes

No. Episodes Broadcast
(UK)
Duration Viewers
(Millions)
In Archive
506Episode 101 September 197924'03"13.0PAL 2" colour videotape
507Episode 208 September 197925'14"12.7PAL 2" colour videotape
508Episode 315 September 197924'32"13.8PAL 2" colour videotape
509Episode 422 September 197926'05"14.4PAL 2" colour videotape

Total Duration 1 Hour 40 Minutes


Audience Appreciation

Average Viewers (Millions) 13.5
Doctor Who Magazine Poll (1998)64.81%  (Position = 101 out of 159)
Doctor Who Magazine Poll (2009)67.19% Higher (Position = 121 out of 200)
Doctor Who Magazine Poll (2014)67.65% Higher (Position = 154 out of 241)


Archives


 All four episodes exist as PAL 2" colour videotapes.



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Notes


This story, the first for Season Seventeen sees the return of the Daleks, and the first return of Davros, since the 1975 story "Genesis of the Daleks". It also introduces Lalla Ward as the newly-regenerated Romana.

This story turned out to be the final Doctor Who script written by Terry Nation and was recorded third to accommodate him. Despite receiving an on-screen credit, as the writer, according to Director Ken Grieve in the commentary for the DVD release the script was in fact ‘98% written by’ Script Editor Douglas Adams.

Terry Nation later moved to America in 1980 and chiefly worked on projects for American television thereafter, most notably the long-running adventure series MacGyver. In the early Nineties, Terry Nation and former Doctor Who Script Editor Gerry Davis put together an unsuccessful proposal to resurrect Doctor Who following its cancellation in 1989. Terry Nation also mooted the possibility of re-launching Blake’s 7. However, Terry Nation’s health waned throughout the Nineties, and the man who had created the Daleks died in March 1997.

This would be Ken Grieve’s only Doctor Who story as Director. Ken Grieve's prior credits included Coronation Street and he went on to helm episodes of programmes such as Poirot, Bugs and The Bill.

"Destiny of the Daleks" is the first story to be solely script edited by new Script Editor Douglas Adams. His influence is evident in this story as it contains his own brand of humour and with references to his previous work - namely the scene where The Doctor pulls from his pocket a book titled "Origins of the Universe" by Oolon Caluphid of The Hitch-Hiker’s Guide to the Galaxy fame.

Romana’s regeneration at the beginning of this story was prompted by Mary Tamm, who played Romana’s first incarnation, deciding to depart the show at the end of the previous season. Lalla Ward, who had played Princess Astra in "The Armageddon Factor" (the story that ended the previous season and which is acknowledged in this story), was cast as the new Romana. According to comments made by Mary Tamm, in the 2007 Key to Time DVD box set, she was willing to do a regeneration scene but was not invited to do so. Instead a whimsical sequence with Romana trying on new bodies was written. This scene however, proved to be controversial due to its light-hearted approach to the concept of regeneration, which has always been a traumatic process for The Doctor.

Michael Wisher was not available to reprise his role of Davros from "Genesis of the Daleks" and so David Gooderson was cast instead, as he was a voice artist and it was thought that he would be able to imitate Wisher’s half-Dalek half-human cadences. David Gooderson also supplied some of the Dalek voices in this story, but this went uncredited.

David Yip, later to star in the The Chinese Detective, plays the Dalek prisoner, Veldan.

Tony Osoba, who played the part of Lan, later played Kracauer in the 1987 Seventh Doctor story "Dragonfire".

Although she is credited in the fourth episode, the appearance of the Movellan Guard played by Cassandra is actually in the third episode.

The other brief incarnations of Romana were played, uncredited, by Maggy Armitage, Yvonne Gallagher and Lee Richards.

Although K9 has no dialogue, and is not seen in this story, he is heard to croak (provided by Roy Skelton) at the very start of this story. His lack of involvement is explained in-story being due to an electronic form of laryngitis. A common misconception amongst fans is that this was because a replacement for John Leeson (who had originally voiced K9) had not yet been cast. In fact, David Brierley had already been given the role as John Leeson’s replacement over three months before this story was made. The actual reason for K9’s absence in this story was because the prop was unsuitable for the large amount of location filming. The production team having learnt from previous problems suffered during location recording – namely "The Stones of Blood" - and so were not keen on repeating the experience.

It has also been reported that Terry Nation had no desire to use K9 in his storyline. The ‘laryngitis’ scene (as well as other continuity references to events that occurred during Season Sixteen) were inserted during rewrites by Douglas Adams.

Originally the entire story was due to be set at night. This however, was changed for financial reasons.

Unfortunately the recording of this story was limited in terms of the Dalek casings that were available. Although seven were retained by the BBC, four of these were inferior versions made for the 1973 Third Doctor story "Planet of the Daleks", of which two were deemed completely unusable and a third required a new skirt section. The other three props were holdovers from the Sixties. One of these was cannibalised to serve as a mould for several cheap, immobile versions which could be used for long shots and scenes in which a Dalek needed to be destroyed on-screen. This left just four working casings, and the budget did not permit the construction of any more.

Because the Davros mask had been designed specifically for Michael Wisher, it did not fit David Gooderson, who had been cast to play this iconic role instead, particularly well. The mask, costume and skirt section were also in a dilapidated state, having been on display at various Doctor Who exhibitions since 1975, but the budget allowed for only minimal repairs.

This story saw, to good effect, the first use on the show of a Steadycam - a rig used to obtain smooth, stable shots from a hand held camera – operated on this occasion by Fred Hamilton during the location shooting. This was still a relatively new invention, having been introduced to the film industry in 1976, and only a handful were yet available in the UK. In 1979 its use in a television production was virtually unheard of.

During the opening credits of this story the individual episodes were called ‘Episodes’, rather than ‘Parts’ - the only story made after the 1973 Third Doctor story "The Green Death" to do so. In the next story, "City of Death", the opening credits returned to listing each instalment as ‘Parts’ and remained so for the remaining Fourth Doctor stories.

Because at the time, ITV - BBC1’s primary competitor - was embroiled in a labour strike, forcing it go off the air, this story enjoyed some of Doctor Who’s largest ratings ever, averaging 13.5 million viewers and reaching an all-time high of 14.4 million for the final episode. This record however, would quickly be surpassed by the very next story, "City of Death".

This story does not indicate how long it has been since the events of "The Armageddon Factor", though clearly not long enough for The Doctor to forget Astra. Romana though is now much wiser and it is implied that she might have been suffering from some illness. Her stated reason for regenerating is, of course, very flippant.

Different accounts and rationales exist for Romana’s regeneration. One of these occurs in the short story "The Lying Old Witch in the Wardrobe" (published by Big Finish Productions in "Short Trips 2: Companions"). In this story, written by Mark Michalowski, it is implied that the incarnation of Romana featured in this story is in fact a manifestation of the TARDIS, and that Romana’s true regeneration occurred after the defeat of the Daleks.

It is not explained how Romana can try out several bodies when regenerating (possibly a similar process to the options the Second Doctor was given at the end of the 1969 story "The War Games", or the intermediate stage seen in "Planet of the Spiders", "Logopolis" and during the 1986 The Trial of a Time Lord season). This ability though has never been completely supported by other stories. In addition in the 2005 Tenth Doctor story "The Christmas Invasion" it is revealed that Time Lords have the ability to re-grow severed limbs within 15 hours of regeneration, suggesting a similar ability to change form might have been possible soon after her regeneration.

One of Romana’s rejected bodies is a diminutive, purple-faced humanoid who wears a distinctive costume. This is the same costume as Zilda is seen wearing in the 1977 story, "The Robots of Death". Other reused costumes from earlier stories may be seen in the scenes involving extras playing slaves working in the Daleks’ mine; these include the robes of a Draconian and the uniform of a Morestran soldier from the 1975 story "Planet of Evil".

Romana’s final costume has her wearing a pink and white outfit which mirrors The Doctors with the same style coat, same type of boots and overly long scarf. This pink costume was worn again by Lalla Ward in the infamous "Dr. Who Meets His Match" television commercial for Prime Computers of Australia, which ended with The Doctor proposing marriage to her!

Skaro first appeared in the 1963 First Doctor story "The Daleks". This is the first time on screen that it is stated that the Daleks left Skaro sometime after the events of "The Daleks". "Planet of the Daleks" suggests this, as the Thals are still alive, and have perhaps expelled the Daleks from Skaro.

The Skaro sound effects from the first Dalek story, "The Daleks", were reused on this story.

After the events in "Genesis of the Daleks", it is revealed that Skaro, the Dalek’s home planet, is still radioactive and so has been abandoned by the Daleks. The high levels of radiation force The Doctor and Romana to take anti-radiation tablets. Skaro is known as ‘D5 Gamma Z Alpha’ to the Movellans.

Look out for the classic scene where The Doctor taunts his Dalek pursuer, after ascending a rope to safety, by asking, ‘If you’re supposed to be the superior race of the universe, why don’t you try climbing after us?’ referring to his understanding that the Dalek is trapped below. It has since been established, however, that Daleks are capable of hovering and rudimentary flight. This was first demonstrated in the 1988 Seventh Doctor story "Remembrance of the Daleks" when a Dalek is seen levitating up a flight of stairs. This ability of being able to surmount obstacles of height was initially revealed in the original Daleks comic strip of the 1960’s.

The BBC Books’ The Eighth Doctor Stories novel "War of the Daleks", written by John Peel, effectively recounted this story to take place not on Skaro, but a planet called Antalin, the Daleks having moved Davros to this planet before his recovery as part of an elaborate plan to avert the destruction of Skaro in "Remembrance of the Daleks" (Having found records about Skaro's destruction during the 1964 First Doctor story "The Dalek Invasion of Earth").

When the TARDIS arrives on Skaro and The Doctor leaves, he is heard to state, ‘I feel as if I’ve been here before’. This is a reference to "Genesis of the Daleks", but also could refer to the fact that both stories, as well as numerous other location shots for other stories were filmed in an old quarry in Wales.

This is the last story in the show to date which takes place on Skaro although the planet is briefly seen in "Remembrance of the Daleks". Skaro is also very briefly seen within the 1996 Eighth Doctor film "Doctor Who: The Movie".

The effects of the Daleks’ weapons are changed from previous stories: Rather then the whole screen turning negative, only the basic area around the victim becomes so.

Parts of the Dalek slaves’ costumes were recycled from previous aliens; For example, one wears the cape of a Draconian, and another has the head of a humanoid-form Axon.

Davros was last seen being exterminated at the end of "Genesis of the Daleks". He survived his ‘death’ using his life support chair as a suspended animation chamber, keeping him in stasis while his body repaired itself. He is resurrected in this story without any apparent power source.

Davros next appears in the 1984 Fifth Doctor story "Resurrection of the Daleks" where he is still frozen as a consequence of this story.

This story contains a number of anomalies. Namely: The Daleks seem to be searching for Davros in the ruins of the Kaled City. However, in "Genesis of the Daleks" Davros was exterminated by the Daleks in a bunker some distance from the Kaled City; It is revealed that The Doctor is familiar with the layout of the Kaled City – despite having only briefly visited the Kaled’s city during "Genesis of the Daleks"; In the fourth episode a Dalek is seen moving up a small slope, when it does this, a hand can just slightly be seen at the edge of the screen pushing it up the slope; When the slaves storm the Movellan’s ship, the one wearing a Draconian-style cape is killed, yet he is later seen alive and well.

The Daleks are heard to state that self sacrifice is illogical, so why do they go on a suicide mission in episode four?; The Doctor is seen giving Romana a bleeper to tell her when next to take her radiation tablets but forgets to give her any of the actual pills.

Interestingly although a Dalek mutant creature is briefly seen - a pink gelatinous blob that The Doctor picks up in the sand - several references are made to the Daleks as 'robots', like the Movellans. The Doctor makes some of these, as does Davros. This is in apparent contradiction to other Dalek stories, such as "The Daleks" and "Genesis of the Daleks", where they are described as mutant humanoids in mechanical casings. (Dals in "The Daleks" and mutated Kaleds in "Genesis of the Daleks"). Some fans see this story as implying that the Daleks have evolved to the point where the organic mutant has been removed, but this is contradicted by all subsequent Dalek stories. In this story Romana does say that they ‘were once humanoid themselves’, though under Dalek interrogation by a lie detecting device, she then states that she knows ‘nothing about Daleks’. Interestingly according to the information text of the DVD release, Romana’s scripted line was ‘I don’t know anything about Dalek operations’ so either the on-screen line was misread or Romana was capable of misleading the Dalek truth detector.

This story was repeated on BBC One in August 1980.

A novelisation of this story, written by Terrance Dicks, was published by Target Books in November 1979. This was released just two months after the original transmission - one of the quickest novelisations of The Doctor Who book range, and was released before any of the previous season’s stories.

This story was released on VHS in July 1994. In 2001 it was re-mastered and re-released as part of The Davros Collection by WH Smith. This box set consisted of the VHS editions of "Genesis of the Daleks", "Destiny of the Daleks", "Resurrection of the Daleks", "Revelation of the Daleks" and "Remembrance of the Daleks".



First and Last

The Firsts:

 The first story of Season Seventeen.

 The introduction of the regenerated companion Romana played by Lalla Ward.

 The first story featuring the Daleks, and the first return of Davros, since the 1975 story "Genesis of the Daleks".

 Douglas Adams' first credited involvement in the show as Script Editor.

 The first Doctor Who story to be directed by Ken Grieve.

 This story featured the first use on the show of a Steadycam.

 The first Doctor Who story to be watched by more than 13 million viewers.

 The first Doctor Who story to have an individual episode watched by more than 14 million viewers. This being the fourth episode.


The Lasts (Subject to Future Stories):

 The last story which takes place on Skaro.

 The last Doctor Who story to be written by Terry Nation.

 The last Doctor Who story to be directed by Ken Grieve.


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The Plot

WARNING: May Contain SpoilersHide Text
Romana Regenerates
Romana Regenerates

After The Doctor fitted the randomiser to the TARDIS, so as to thwart The Black Guardian, the first place it chooses to deposit the TARDIS is somewhere The Doctor knows only too well - Skaro. After Romana has regenerated into the form of Princess Astra, she and The Doctor leave the TARDIS to investigate.

After watching a bedraggled group of slaves bury one of their dead, a Kantrian, The Doctor and Romana see a space craft land and bury itself in the sand of the planet's surface. A series of mining explosions then rock the planet and the time travellers take cover in some ruined buildings. The Doctor however, becomes trapped under some fallen masonry so leaving Romana having to return to the TARDIS to fetch K9.

While she is gone, The Doctor is rescued by the Movellans, a race of robots, and taken back to their newly arrived spaceship. When Romana returns to where she left The Doctor she finds him missing. One of the slave workers, Tyssan, who has been following her, approaches and she backs away in alarm, falling down a duct into a lower level of the ruined city. She is soon surrounded by a group of Daleks who take her away for questioning. Following this she is assigned to work with Labour Force Two, a group of slave workers, clearing rocks away from the drilling areas.

Romana and The Doctor
Romana and The Doctor

The Doctor and Romana soon discover that the Daleks are using explosive charges and a group of humanoid slave workers to mine the planet in search of something very precious to them.

Tyssan is found by the Movellans and explains what has happened to Romana. The Doctor, together with a group of Movellans, returns to the city to investigate. They meet up with Romana, who had feigned death to escape from the mining team, and deep in the city find what the Daleks are searching for their creator - Davros.

Romana Discovers The Daleks
Romana Discovers The Daleks

A stalemate has arisen in an interplanetary war that the Daleks are waging against the Movellans, and the Daleks only hope is that Davros will be able to give them the edge.

On discovering Davros, in the ruins of the old Kaled city, he is reactivated. It appears that his life support systems has held him in suspended animation ever since his apparent extermination by the Daleks (see "Genesis of the Daleks"). Davros takes command of the Daleks and quickly deduces that the battle computers of the two warring races are locked in a logical stalemate and that he can break this by introducing an element of intuition.

Meanwhile The Doctor, Romana and Tyssan, after witnessing Davros’ revival escape from the old Kaled city and head back towards the Movellans’ spaceship. However, the Movellans, now aware that the Daleks need Davros to break the logical stalemate that the Movellans’ and the Daleks’ battle computers are in, decide to recapture The Doctor to help them do likewise. They stun Romana and place her inside a tube containing a powerful explosive, the Nova device. This will be the bait to lure The Doctor. The trap works and the Movellans take The Doctor and Romana back to their spaceship, intending to destroy the planet with the bomb once they are safely clear.

Dalek Control Room
Dalek Control Room

Having been briefed on the problem facing the Daleks Davros decides to destroy the Movellans using a squad of Daleks on a suicide mission. Each Dalek is loaded with bombs which will be detonated by Davros once they are in position around the Movellan spaceship.

Tyssan has meanwhile organised the slave workers to attack the Movellans and then to try and prevent the suicide Daleks from achieving their positions. The Doctor returns to the city and tricks Davros into inadvertently detonating the suicide Daleks before they reach the Movellan spaceship and Romana stops the Movellan commander, Sharrell, from detonating the Nova device by hand.

The Movellans are deactivated and Davros is cryogenically frozen on board the Movellan spaceship. Tyssan then pilots the spaceship so as to return the slaves to their rightful homes and to take Davros to Earth so as to ensure that he is put on trial for his crimes.

With the danger over The Doctor and Romana return to the TARDIS which then dematerialises from the surface of Skaro.

 
The Movellans
The Movellans
Is Davros Dead?
Is Davros Dead?
Davros Greets the Daleks
Davros Greets the Daleks
Davros and The Doctor
Davros and The Doctor
 
Davros
Davros
The Daleks Prepare to Attack The Movellans
The Daleks Prepare to Attack The Movellans
Daleks on the Move
Daleks on the Move
The Movellans
The Movellans




Quote of the Story


 'So, the long darkness has ended. An eternity of waiting is over. The resurrection has come, as I always knew it would. Now, where are my Daleks?'

Davros



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Release Information

FormatTitleRelease Date (UK)Code NumberCover ArtRemarks
Video
VHS
The Tom Baker YearsSeptember 1992BBCV 4839PhotoClip only Introduced and commented on by Tom Baker Double cassette release
Video
VHS
Destiny of the DaleksJuly 1994BBCV 5350Andrew Skilleter
Video
VHS
Destiny of the DaleksSeptember 2001BBCV 7252Photo-montageRemastered version Part of the "The Davros Collection Boxed Set" released by WH Smith
Audio
CD
Doctor Who at the BBC Radiophonic Workshop Volume Two - New Beginnings 1970-1980May 2005WMSF 6024-2Music and sound effects
Video
DVD
Destiny of the DaleksNovember 2007BBCDVD 2434Photo-montage
Video
DVD
Destiny of the DaleksNovember 2007BBCDVD 2508Photo-montagePart of the "The Davros Collection" Box Set containing 5 Davros stories
Audio
CD
Destiny of the DaleksNovember 2012Photo-montageNarrated by Lalla Ward (Romana)
Audio
CD
Classic TV Adventures - Collection OneApril 2017Photo-montagePart of the "Classic TV Adventures Collection One" Box Set Narrated by Lalla Ward (Romana)
Audio
LP
Destiny of the DaleksApril 2019Photo-montageLimited Edition Double LP - Narrated by Peter Purves (Steven Taylor).
Video
Blu-Ray
Doctor Who: The Collection - Season 17 (Limited Edition)Due: December 2021Photo-montageBlu-Ray Limited Edition boxed set containing 5 specially restored stories and an updated version of "Shada" with enhanced animation


In Print

FormatTitleRelease Date (UK)PublisherAuthorCover ArtRemarks
Novel
Novel
Doctor Who and the Destiny of the DaleksNovember 1979Target No. 21Terrance DicksAndrew SkilleterISBN: 0-426-20096-9
Novel
Novel
Destiny of the DaleksJuly 1992Target No. 21Terrance DicksAlister PearsonVirgin new cover reprint.
ISBN: 0-426-20096-9
Doctor Who CMS Magazine (In Vision)Issue 39 (Released: October 1992)
Doctor Who Magazine - ArchiveIssue 86 (Released: March 1984)
Doctor Who Magazine - ArchiveIssue 283 (Released: October 1999)
Doctor Who Magazine - Time TeamIssue 365 (Released: February 2006)
Doctor Who Magazine - The Fact of FictionIssue 389 (Released: December 2007)
Doctor Who DVD FilesVolume 58 (Released: March 2011)

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Photo Gallery


The Doctor and Companions

 
Tom Baker
The Fourth Doctor

   

Lalla Ward
Romana 2
 
David Brierley (voice only)
K9 Mk II
   




On Release

Tom Baker Years VHS Video Cover
Tom Baker Years VHS Video Cover

BBC
VIDEO
VHS Video Cover
VHS Video Cover

BBC
VIDEO
W.H. Smith VHS Video Cover
W.H. Smith VHS Video Cover

BBC
VIDEO
   
Audio - Volume 2: New Beginnings
Audio - Volume 2: New Beginnings

BBC
AUDIO
DVD Cover
DVD Cover

BBC
VIDEO
Davros Collection DVD Cover
Davros Collection DVD Cover

BBC
VIDEO
   
Soundtrack CD Cover
Soundtrack CD Cover

BBC
AUDIO
Classic TV Adventures Collection One CD Cover
Classic TV Adventures Collection One CD Cover

BBC
AUDIO
Original Television Soundtrack LP Cover
Original Television Soundtrack LP Cover

Demon Records
AUDIO
   


In Print

Target Book Cover
Target Book Cover

Target
NOVEL
 
Reprinted Virgin Book Cover
Reprinted Virgin Book Cover

Virgin
NOVEL
   


Magazines

Doctor Who CMS Magazine (In Vision): Issue 39
Doctor Who CMS Magazine (In Vision): Issue 39

CMS
Doctor Who Magazine - Archive: Issue 86
Doctor Who Magazine - Archive: Issue 86

Marvel Comics
Doctor Who Magazine - Archive: Issue 283
Doctor Who Magazine - Archive: Issue 283

Marvel Comics
   
Doctor Who Magazine - Time Team: Issue 365
Doctor Who Magazine - Time Team: Issue 365

Marvel Comics
Doctor Who Magazine - The Fact of Fiction: Issue 389
Doctor Who Magazine - The Fact of Fiction: Issue 389

Marvel Comics
Doctor Who DVD Files: Volume 58
Doctor Who DVD Files: Volume 58

GE Fabbri
   

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