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Shada
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Synopsis


Professor Chronotis
Professor Chronotis
 When one of the Artefacts of Gallifrey - a dangerous book dating back to the time of the all-powerful Rassilon - goes missing from his study, Cambridge professor and retired Time Lord Dr. Chronotis calls in the aid of The Doctor and Romana. The Doctor is very worried. Who knows what powers could be unleashed if the book falls into the wrong hands?

 Then the mysterious Skagra arrives, armed with a thought-draining sphere and a scheme for one universal mind. But first he must get hold of the book...

Source: BBC VHS Video


General Information

Season: Seventeen
Production Code: 5M
Number of Episodes: 6
Number of Incomplete/Missing Episodes:6
Percentage of Episodes Held:0%
Working Titles:"Sunburst"
Production Dates: October - November 1979
Colour Status: Colour
Studio: Ealing Television Film Studios and BBC Television Centre (TC3)
Location: Cambridge, Cambridgshire: The Backs and Clare Bridge (River Cam), Silver Street, Trumpington Street, Free School Lane, Bridge Street, Portugal Place, Trinity Lane, Botolph Lane, King’s Parade, St Edward’s Passage, Emmanuel College (St Andrew’s Street), Blackmoor Head Yard, Garret Hostel Lane and Portugal Street.
Grantchester, Cambridgshire: High Street and Grantchester Meadows.
Writer:Douglas Adams
Director:Pennant Roberts
Producers:Graham Williams and John Nathan-Turner (Video Release)
Script Editor:Douglas Adams
Editor:Tariq Anwar
Production Manager:Ralph Wilton
Production Assistant:Olivia Bazalgette
Production Unit Managers:John Nathan-Turner and Kathleen Bidmead
Assistant Floor Manager:Val McCrimmon
Designer:Victor Meredith
Costume Designer:Rupert Roxburghe-Jarvis
Make-Up Designer:Kim Burns
Cameramen:Fintan Sheehan (Film) and Alec Wheal (Senior Cameraman)
Incidental Music:Dudley Simpson
Special Sounds (SFX Editor):Dick Mills
Studio Sounds:John Hartshorn
Lighting:Mike Jefferies
Visual Effects:Dave Havard
Title Sequence:Bernard Lodge
Title Music:Ron Grainer and the BBC Radiophonic Workshop. Arranged by Delia Derbyshire
Number of Doctors: 1
The Doctor: Tom Baker (The Fourth Doctor)
Number of Companions: 2The Companions: Lalla Ward (Romana 2) and David Brierley (voice only) (K9 Mk II) Additional Cast: Denis Carey (Professor Chronotis), Christopher Neame (Skagra), Daniel Hill (Chris Parsons), Gerald Champion (Porter), David Brierley (Computer Voice), Victoria Burgoyne (Claire Keightley), Derek Pollitt (Professor Caldera), John Hallett (Constable), James Coombes (Voice of the Krargs), Shirley Dixon (Voice of Skagra's Ship)Setting: Cambridge, St. Cedd’s College (circa 1979), Think Tank Space Station, Skagra’s spaceship and Shada. Villains:Krargs and Skagra

The Episodes

No. Episodes Broadcast
(UK)
Duration Viewers
(Millions)
In Archive
-Part 1Not Broadcast--PAL 2" colour videotape
-Part 2Not Broadcast--PAL 2" colour videotape
-Part 3Not Broadcast--PAL 2" colour videotape
-Part 4Not Broadcast--PAL 2" colour videotape
-Part 5Not Broadcast--PAL 2" colour videotape
-Part 6Not Broadcast--PAL 2" colour videotape


Audience Appreciation

Doctor Who Magazine Poll (1998)64.05% 
Doctor Who Magazine Poll (2010)66.80% Higher


Archives


 Original studio material held on PAL 2” colour videotape and all footage still held on 16mm colour film.



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Notes


"Shada" is the famous ‘lost story’ of Doctor Who, due to the production of this story being shut down by a BBC labour strike.

This story was written by Douglas Adams and became his final contribution to Doctor Who. It was envisaged as a Time Lord story without a Gallifreyan setting and replaced another which Douglas Adams had wanted to write about The Doctor losing interest in saving the universe and going into retreat - an idea which Producer Graham Williams prevented him from pursuing, on the grounds that it would send the show up too much.

Originally, this story’s director was intended to be Michael Hayes, who had last worked on "City of Death". In the event, however, Michael Hayes was replaced by Pennant Roberts, whose most recent Doctor Who credit had been on the Season Sixteen story "The Pirate Planet" that was also written by Douglas Adams.

"Shada" was originally intended to be the final story of this season but a recurrence of an industrial dispute that had previously caused difficulties during the recording of "The Invasion of Time" and "The Armageddon Factor" eventually led to this story’s cancellation, even though extensive location filming in the Cambridge area and the first of its three planned studio sessions had already been completed.

When industrial action had forced the postponement of all recording at the BBC Television Centre on the 19th November 1979 the fate of this story suddenly became unclear. With three further studio days planned to take place in December the strike continued to drag on resulting in Pennant Roberts facing a new problem. Many of the BBC productions, which had been delayed by the strike, were Christmas programmes, viewed by the BBC as critical to their broadcast schedule. It soon became clear that even if the strike ended straight away it was highly unlikely that "Shada" would retain its original recording dates.

Despite proceeding with rehearsals by the 30th November 1979 Graham Williams was forced to reluctantly concede that his Doctor Who swansong would never be completed, and ordered the cast and crew of "Shada" to stand down. As it happened, the BBC reached an agreement with the unions the very next day. But for "Shada" it was too late.

Graham Williams did continue to investigate the possibility of remounting the five abandoned studio days later in December but it quickly became clear, however, that "Shada" could not be booked into a studio until at least January 1980, even assuming that the appropriate budgetary allocation could be secured. With the story scheduled to begin transmission on the 19th January 1980, this effectively settled the matter and so on the 10th December 1979 it was officially decided that "The Horns of Nimon", the story that preceded "Shada", would mark the end of a truncated Season Seventeen.

This turn of events brought an unhappy end to the tenures of both Producer Graham Williams and Writer/Script Editor Douglas Adams on Doctor Who. Graham Williams would continue to work as a producer through much of the Eighties on shows like Supergran and Tales of the Unexpected. He also wrote a Doctor Who story entitled "The Nightmare Fair" for the abortive original version of Doctor Who’s Season Twenty Three, which he subsequently novelised for Target Books. Graham Williams died in 1990.

Douglas Adams went on to great fame thanks his "The Hitchhiker's Guide to Galaxy" novel which resulted in a radio play and a television adaptation, Douglas Adams also wrote four sequels as well as several other books, encompassing both fiction and non-fiction. One of these was the 1987 novel "Dirk Gently's Holistic Detective Agency", which recycled various ideas from Shada including the character of Professor Chronotis. Douglas Adams died in 2001.

Among Professor Chronotis’ books are H. G. Wells’ "The Time Machine", Saul Bellow’s "The Victim", Roget’s Thesaurus, a colour edition of the "British Book of Wild Birds", "Alternative Betelgeuse", "Wuthering Height"s, a volume that recommends Tandoori chicken for starters, and "Sweeney Todd".

The Doctor is heard reading from "The Old Curiosity Shop" towards the end (‘“Her little homely dress. Her favourite!” cried the old man, pressing it to his breast and patting it with his shrivelled hand “She'll miss it when she wakes”.’).

The ‘lost’ book, "The Worshipful and Ancient Law of Gallifrey", is actually a ‘key’ to Shada: turning to the last page will send a TARDIS there. It dates back to the days of Rassilon, and is one of the 'artefacts'. Time runs backwards over the book (carbon dating puts its age at -20,000 years) it is also atomically unstable, and seems to absorb radiation.

All of the artefacts have ‘stupendous power’: although many of the meanings are lost, the power and the Gallifreyan rituals remain.

Romana is heard reciting the words used at the Academy induction ceremony: ‘I swear to protect the ancient Law of Gallifrey with all my might and brain. I will to the end of my days with justice and with honour temper my actions and my thoughts.’).

The Doctor uses the "The Worshipful and Ancient Law of Gallifrey" in the Virgin Books’ The New Adventures novel "The Dimension Riders".

The Doctor orders Skagra’s ship to reverse the polarity of its main warp feeds (this, and various other modifications, turns the ship into a primitive time machine).

When Skagra examines The Doctor's life, brief clips from "The Pirate Planet", "The Power of Kroll", "Creature from the Pit", "The Androids of Tara", "Destiny of the Daleks" and "City of Death" are shown.

Professor Chronotis recognises the TARDIS as a Type 40 (‘Came out when I was a boy: that shows you how old I am.’), whereas Skagra’s ship thinks that it’s a Type 39, or possibly a Type 40.

More techno-babble is used in the show when: Professor Chronotis and Clare Keightley find themselves ‘jammed between two irrational time interfaces’: his TARDIS’ conceptor geometry relay, with magranomic trigger, has a defunct field separator, but this won’t be needed if they can fix the interfacial resonator; and Chronotis’ memories are extracted, by Skagra, through psychoactive extraction, ‘someone has stolen part of his mind’.

Chronotis is on his last regeneration, but is brought back to life by Claire mucking around with his TARDIS. He is able to beat out a message with his hearts in Gallifreyan Morse code.

A man who is probably Chronotis reappears in the BBC Books’ The Eight Doctor Stories novel "Unnatural History" as Professor Daniel Joyce.

Rassilon mentions, in the Big Finish Productions Eighth Doctor audio story "Zagreus", that he is Conqueror of Dronid, here mentioned as Skagra’s homeworld.

This story contains a couple of anomalies. Namely: Clare Keightley is seen dropping her books before actually running into the porter and in the second episode Romana calls Chris by his first name, despite having not heard it before.

In an unfilmed scene in the fifth episode, a listing of prisoners kept on Shada included a Dalek, a Cyberman, and a Zygon. However, instead of these, aliens bearing resemblance to Ice Warriors were seen.

It is revealed that The Doctor received an honorary degree from St. Cedd’s College, Cambridge, in 1960 and he visited Professor Chronotis in 1955, 1960 and 1964 in his fourth incarnation, and also in 1958 in a different incarnation.

The Doctor is seen vortex walking between Chronotis’ and his own TARDIS.

This story takes place in October 1979; coincidentally that is the same month Douglas Adams published his first "The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy" novel.

Had this story been broadcast, it would have marked the final use of the 1967 arrangement of the "Doctor Who Theme" by Delia Derbyshire, the tunnel opening sequence by Bernard Lodge and the diamond logo introduced in the 1973 Third Doctor story "The Time Warrior". "Shada" would have also become the final six-part story of the show. This accolade instead went to "The Armageddon Factor" - the final story of the previous season, Season Sixteen.

An attempt was made to remount this story by new Producer John Nathan-Turner. In April 1980 John Nathan-Turner even sent a revised set of scripts to Pennant Roberts, to seek the director’s input on the idea of completing the story in the form of two fifty-minute episodes to air over Christmas. Plans for this remounted version of "Shada" started to move forward, even to the point of arranging to have a minimal cast reunited for a pair of two-day studio blocks in October 1980. But for various reasons these plans ultimately came to nothing, and so in June 1980 this production was officially cancelled. Nonetheless, John Nathan-Turner arranged for the extant "Shada" material to be preserved within the BBC Archives for possible future use.

In 1983, an unofficial "Shada" compilation was prepared by a number of Doctor Who fans. In addition to the completed location and studio material, they used printed text from the rehearsal scripts in place of the unfinished segments. This incarnation of "Shada" debuted at the Panopticon 5 convention in Birmingham on the 3rd and 4th September 1983.

In the same year two scenes were edited into the Twentieth Anniversary special, "The Five Doctors", when Tom Baker had declined to participate. As John Nathan-Turner wanted all five incarnations of The Doctor represented he elected to use footage from this story, notably the punting sequence on the Cam and a brief sequence of The Doctor’s escape from the floating ball, in order to ensure that the Fourth Doctor had a presence in the anniversary story. An additional, third, sequence can also be seen in the Special Edition of "The Five Doctors" released on DVD in November 1999 and Twenty Fifth Anniversary Edition, which contains the original broadcast version as well as the Special Edition, released in March 2008.

Due to the commercial successes with several special BBC Video Doctor Who releases, in 1991, including an extended version of the 1989 Seventh Doctor story "The Curse of Fenric", as well as "Doctor Who: The Hartnell Years" and "Doctor Who: The Troughton Years" - two compilations of episodes from stories that were no longer completely held by the BBC Archives – convinced the BBC that fans were enthusiastic about these non-standard video releases and that "Shada" could be released on VHS video compiling existing footage broken down into the planned six episodes.

John Nathan-Turner approached Tom Baker about recording linking narration which he agreed to do, on the condition that he would appear as himself and not as the Fourth Doctor.

For this video release several short clips of Tom Baker were recorded in February 1992, at the Doctor Who: Behind the Sofa exhibition at the Museum of the Moving Image in London. David Brierley returned to record some new K9 dialogue and Keff McCulloch - who had worked on several Doctor Who stories in the late Eighties beginning with "Time and The Rani" - composed new incidental music. Keff McCulloch attempted to mimic the style of Dudley Simpson, who had originally been due to compose the incidental music for "Shada". Various special effects were also added or refined. The video was released in July 1992 and included a booklet containing Douglas Adams’s full script of the original production.

This very special release gave fans the first glimpse of this story as it could have been after a delay of more than twelve years. But despite being released on video this story has never been aired on television – making it the only Doctor Who television story never to be broadcast. To date this story has only been available in the VHS format, with no announced plans for a DVD release as of 2010 (although clips from "Shada" have been used on featurettes on other DVD releases).

Although "Shada" became commercially available in 1992, there remained a desire in some quarters to prepare a version of the adventure in which all of the material was properly dramatised. Big Finish Productions came up with the idea to develop an audio version of this story. After considerable effort, Big Finish Productions and BBCi, the team responsible for the BBC’s official Doctor Who website, successfully obtained the necessary permissions from the estate of Douglas Adams.

This story was eventually released in 2003 as a webcast in May (with animation) and an audio release. Both versions starred Paul McGann, as the Eighth Doctor, Lalla Ward, as Romana, and John Leeson, providing the voice of K9. Lalla Ward is the only actor to appear in both the original television version and the audio version.

Although working from Douglas Adams’ original script, portions of this version were reworked by Gary Russell to make the story fit into Doctor Who continuity. This included a new introduction, and a new explanation for the Fourth Doctor and Romana being ‘taken out of time’ during the events of "The Five Doctors"; the Eighth Doctor has come to collect Romana and K9 because he has begun to have a feeling that there was something they should have done at that time. In addition to this: Romana is referred to as Madam President by Skagra in Episode five; In Episode 6 it is Romana, using her Presidential powers, who decides that Chronotis should be allowed to return to Cambridge; When the policeman enters Chronotis’ room, The Doctor can be heard talking about a ‘terrible way to see in the New Year’ in a possible reference to the Eighth Doctor’s first adventure, The 1996 television film "Doctor Who: The Movie" and various other minor dialogue changes throughout, mostly relating to the Eighth Doctor reflecting that he has missed Romana and K9 since they left him and how much he enjoyed their company in the past.

The first episode of this version of "Shada" premiered on the BBC Doctor Who website on the 2nd May 2003, as part of the festivities surrounding the show’s fortieth anniversary. The six episodes were made available on a weekly basis, and each was accompanied by limited animation featuring the artwork of Lee Sullivan. The webcast also featured outlines of the first eight Doctors’ faces. A slightly extended edition of the play was then released on CD in December. The audio play was also broadcast on BBC 7 in December 2005 (as a 2˝ hour omnibus), and was repeated in six parts as the opening story to the Eighth Doctor’s summer season which began in July 2006.

Listen out for when Skagra is investigating The Doctor, clips from three other Big Finish productions can be heard, exclusively on the CD version – "The Fires of Vulcan", "The Marian Conspiracy" and "Phantasmagoria".

In the second episode of the webcast version, when Chris is in his lab showing Clare the book, a vending machine-like object in the background is labelled ‘Nutrimat’, a reference to a similar device in Douglas Adams’ "The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy". Two other references are a sequence where Skagra steals a Ford Prefect and when images of Hitchhiker's Guide characters appear as inmates on Shada itself.

The battered space helmet which The Doctor adapts in the sixth episode of the webcast version bears the serial number ‘NCC-1701D’. This just happens to be the registration ident of the Starship Enterprise in Star Trek: The Next Generation.

Elements of "Shada" were reused by Douglas Adams for his novel "Dirk Gently’s Holistic Detective Agency", in particular the character of Professor Chronotis, his time-travelling apartment, and St. Cedd’s college.

Douglas Adams did not allow "Shada", or any of his other Doctor Who stories, to be novelised by Target Books. This story therefore is one of only five stories from the original run of the show not to be novelised by Target. The other Douglas Adam’s stories being "The Pirate Planet" and "City of Death", plus Eric Saward’s two Dalek stories ("Resurrection of the Daleks" and "Revelation of the Daleks"). A BBC novelisation, written by Gareth Roberts was finally published in March 2012.

An unsanctioned fan novelisation was written in 1989, by Paul Scoones, for the New Zealand Fan Club. Titled "Doctor Who and Shada", it was then released later by TSV Books in New Zealand with a cover by Alistair Hughes.

An animated version of this story was released on DVD and Blu-Ray in December 2017.



First and Last

The Firsts:

 The first story to be halted mid production and so not broadcast


The Lasts (Subject to Future Stories):

 The last story of Season Seventeen.

 David Brierley’s last story as the voice of K9.

 The last Doctor Who story to be written by Douglas Adams.

 Graham Williams' last story as Producer.

 Douglas Adams' last story as Script Editor.

 John Nathan-Turner's last involvement in the show as Production Unit Manager.


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The Plot

WARNING: May Contain SpoilersHide Text
The Doctor, Punting
The Doctor, Punting

The Doctor and Romana arrive in present-day Earth to visit an old friend of The Doctor’s, Professor Chronotis, an elderly Time Lord who absconded from Gallifrey and now lives a quiet academic life at St Cedd’s College in Cambridge. However, The Doctor is not the only one with an interest in Professor Chronotis, as a criminal called Skagra is also looking for him.

The scar faced Skagra, wearing a white outfit and cape with a white hat, has arrived on Earth in a spaceship from a space station called the Think Tank. He has in his procession a device, in the form of a floating sphere which can drain minds, which he plans to trap Professor Chronotis’s mind and thereby learn the location of a book entitled "The Worshipful and Ancient Law of Gallifrey" which Professor Chronotis has ‘borrowed’ from the Time Lords.

When The Doctor learns of this book all three of them start hunting for it. The Doctor and Romana know of its importance and the harm it can do if it gets into the wrong hands. But despite going through every book in Professor Chronotis’ room they are unable to locate it. This is because the book has been taken by mistake by student Chris Parsons. When Chris Parsons discovers the book, amongst the others he borrowed from Professor Chronotis, he realises that as well as being very old it is written in a very strange text in a totally unknown alphabet. After conducting some tests on it, which prove inconclusive, he invites a colleague, Clare Keightley, over to see it for herself, telling her he doesn’t think this book is from the Earth!

Romana
Romana

On failing to locate the book The Doctor and Romana start to quiz Professor Chronotis about where else it could be. Professor Chronotis then remembers Chris Parsons’ recent visit and so The Doctor and so goes off to find Chris Parsons leaving Romana with Professor Chronotis. The Doctor though is unaware that shortly after leaving that Skagra arrives at Professor Chronotis’ residence. Professor Chronotis tries to make as if he hasn’t got the book that Skagra wants. Skagra therefore opens the bag he is carrying and a silver sphere attaches to the Professor’s head and he falls to the ground. Skagra then discovers that the book has gone missing and that The Doctor has gone in search of it.

The Doctor, on retrieving the book from Chris Parsons starts to make his way back to Professor Chronotis and Romana unaware that Skagra is on an intercept course. Skagra eventually succeeds in obtaining the book, after his sphere chases The Doctor through the streets of Cambridge. Skagra then kidnaps Romana and hijacks the TARDIS.

Skagra
Skagra

The book turns out to be the key to getting to Shada, the ancient prison planet of the Time Lords. Skagra’s objective is to use his sphere on one of the inmates who was incarcerated there. This is a criminal called Salyavin, one of the most powerful criminals in history, whose unique mental powers he can then exploit to project his own mind into every other creature in the universe. But when Skagra uses The Doctor’s TARDIS to reach Shada, he discovers that Salyavin’s cell is empty.

Meanwhile, after a number of close encounters with the Krargs – Skagra’s monstrous crystalline servants - The Doctor, Professor Chronotis and K9, along with Chris Parsons and Clare Keightley, arrive on Shada in Professor Chronotis’ TARDIS, which has been disguised as his study.

It is then that it is revealed that Professor Chronotis is in fact Salyavin and that he escaped from Shada centuries ago and has been living peacefully on Earth ever since. When Skagra starts to use one of his mind draining spheres K9 fires at it but instead of destroying it the sphere splits into smaller spheres which attach themselves to anyone who is unable to escape from the cell – including Professor Chronotis. In the confusion Skagra’s hold over Romana is broken allowing her to be reunited with The Doctor. But they are unable to reach the safety of the TARDIS due to the Krargs.

Professor Chronotis
Professor Chronotis

Skagra though is able to reach The Doctor’s TARDIS and so is able to depart, with Professor Chronotis in tow, from Shada. However, inside Skagra soon realizes something is very wrong when The Doctor, who has managed to reach Professor Chronotis’ TARDIS, generates a forcefield which snares Skagra in the TARDIS. The Doctor, with the help of Romana, K9 and Clare Keightley, then uses this forcefield to reach his TARDIS. This though proves to be no easy task and when he eventually enters the TARDIS everyone, especially Skagra, think that he had succumbed to The Vortex. But instead The Doctor comes to inside a small equipment room in the TARDIS where he builds a metal helmet that will project his thoughts as well as acting as a barrier against Skagra’s mind draining spheres.

Having regained control of the TARDIS, Skagra pilots it to a cargo vessel commanded by the Krargs. When Professor Chronotis’ TARDIS arrives Skagra thinks that The Doctor is inside and so is shocked when The Doctor appears from within the TARDIS. The Doctor then uses the metal helmet to control the prisoners against Skagra but Skagra turns them back onto him. Skagra then uses a Krarg on The Doctor but K9, who has appeared from Professor Chronotis’ TARDIS, holds it off. This allows Romana and Clara to attack the other Kraga, using the gas that formed them in the first place, so that they start to dissolve.

However, Skagra escapes to his own spaceship. But instead of arriving on the bridge Skagra finds himself in a cell. Skagra soon realises that earlier The Doctor had entered his spaceship and had reprogrammed parts of the ship’s computer so convincing it that The Doctor is its Lord and not Skagra. Skagra has become a prisoner in his own spaceship.

With Skagra dealt with they all return to Cambridge and The Doctor and Romana take tea with Professor Chronotis before leaving in the TARDIS promising to keep his true identity secret.

 
Romana, The Doctor and Professor Chronotis
Romana, The Doctor and Professor Chronotis
The Doctor Reading
The Doctor Reading
K9 and Romana
K9 and Romana
K9 with Professor Chronotis
K9 with Professor Chronotis
 
Chris Parsons and Romana
Chris Parsons and Romana
Skagra and Romana
Skagra and Romana
Shada
Shada
The Krarg
The Krarg




Quote of the Story


 'It’s a troublesome place, difficult to administer, and as a piece of real estate it’s worthless because by definition there'd be no one to sell it to.'

The Doctor (an unfilmed exchange between The Doctor and Skagra on ruling the Universe):



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Release Information

FormatTitleRelease Date (UK)Code NumberCover ArtRemarks
Video
VHS
ShadaJuly1992BBCV 4814Photo-montageRelease incorporates all available filmed footage prior to cancellation with new effects and music score by Keff McCulloch, linked by video inserts with Tom Baker narrating the action Includes a book of the original scripts
Video
VHS
The Tom Baker YearsSeptember 1992BBCV 4839PhotoClip only Introduced and commented on by Tom Baker Double cassette release
Audio
CD
30 Years at the Radiophonic Workshop1993BBC CD 871Photo-montageSound effects
Video
DVD
ShadaJanuary 2013BBCDVD 3388Part of the "The Legacy Collection" Box Set and also includes "More Than 30 Years in the TARDIS" documentary
Video
DVD
ShadaDecember 2017BBCDVD 3867Photo-montageHD with incomplete footage completed using high-quality animation.
Video
Blu-Ray
ShadaDecember 2017BBCBD 0413Photo-montageHD with incomplete footage completed using high-quality animation.
Video
Blu-Ray
Shada (Limited Edition Steelbook)December 2017BBCBD 0431Photo-montageLimited Edition Blu-Ray Steelbook includes HD with incomplete footage completed using high-quality animation.
Video
Blu-Ray
Doctor Who: The Collection - Season 17 (Limited Edition)Due: December 2021Photo-montageBlu-Ray Limited Edition boxed set containing 5 specially restored stories and an updated version of "Shada" with enhanced animation


In Print

FormatTitleRelease Date (UK)PublisherAuthorCover ArtRemarks
Novel
Novel
ShadaMarch 2012BBC BooksGareth RobertsHardback. ISBN: 978-0-42525-998-6
CD
CD
ShadaMarch 2012BBC AudioGareth RobertsAudio version of the BBC Books novel read by Lalla Ward (Romana) with John Leeson (voice of K9).
Novel
Novel
ShadaJanuary 2013BBC BooksGareth RobertsPaperback. ISBN: 978-1-84990-328-8
Doctor Who CMS Magazine (In Vision)Issue 44 (Released: June 1993)
Doctor Who Monthly - Article/FeatureIssue 45 (Released: October 1980)
Doctor Who Monthly - ArchiveIssue 81 (Released: October 1983)
Doctor Who Magazine - ArticleIssue 189 (Released: August 1992)
Doctor Who Magazine - ArchiveIssue 267 (Released: July 1998)

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Photo Gallery


The Doctor and Companions

 
Tom Baker
The Fourth Doctor

   

Lalla Ward
Romana 2
 
David Brierley (voice only)
K9 Mk II
   




On Release

VHS Video Cover
VHS Video Cover

BBC
VIDEO
Tom Baker Years VHS Video Cover
Tom Baker Years VHS Video Cover

BBC
VIDEO
Sound Effects CD Cover
Sound Effects CD Cover

BBC
AUDIO
The Legacy Collection DVD Cover
The Legacy Collection DVD Cover

BBC
VIDEO
   
DVD Cover
DVD Cover

BBC
VIDEO
Blu-Ray Cover
Blu-Ray Cover

BBC
VIDEO
Limited Edition Blu-Ray Steelbook
Limited Edition Blu-Ray Steelbook

BBC
VIDEO



In Print

BBC Book Cover (Hardback)
BBC Book Cover (Hardback)

BBC
NOVEL
BBC Audio CD Cover
BBC Audio CD Cover

BBC
CD
BBC Book Cover (Paperback)
BBC Book Cover (Paperback)

BBC
NOVEL
   


Magazines

Doctor Who CMS Magazine (In Vision): Issue 44
Doctor Who CMS Magazine (In Vision): Issue 44

CMS
Doctor Who Monthly - Article/Feature: Issue 45
Doctor Who Monthly - Article/Feature: Issue 45

Marvel Comics
Doctor Who Monthly - Archive: Issue 81
Doctor Who Monthly - Archive: Issue 81

Marvel Comics
Doctor Who Magazine - Article: Issue 189
Doctor Who Magazine - Article: Issue 189

Marvel Comics
   
Doctor Who Magazine - Archive: Issue 267
Doctor Who Magazine - Archive: Issue 267

Marvel Comics


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