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Tom Baker
Logopolis
Fourth Doctor Logo


Synopsis


Logopolis
Logopolis
 Haunted by a shadowy watcher, The Doctor's bound for Logopolis in search of a new chameleon circuit for the TARDIS, with a dangerous stowaway on board. Now in a new body, and bent on Universe domination, his arch enemy the Master is back with a vengeance. His plan could rock Logopolis, the keystone of all life. Could this mean the unravelling of the causal nexus and the end of the universe itself?

Source: BBC VHS Video


General Information

Season: Eighteen
Production Code: 5V
Story Number: 115
Episode Numbers:550 - 553
Number of Episodes: 4
Percentage of Episodes Held:100%
Production Dates: December 1980 - January 1981
Broadcast Started: 28 February 1981
Broadcast Finished: 21 March 1981
Colour Status: Colour
Studio: BBC Television Centre (TC3 and TC6)
Location: Ursula Street (Battersea, London), Cadogan Pier (Chelsea Embankment, London), Albert Bridge (London), lay-by on the A413 (between Denham and Amersham, Buckinghamshire), BBC Overseas Monitoring and Receiving Station (Crowsley Park, Blounts Court Road, Sonning Common, Berkshire), Lovell Telescope (Jodrell Bank).
Writer:Christopher H Bidmead
Director:Peter Grimwade
Producer:John Nathan-Turner
Executive Producer:Barry Letts
Script Editor:Christopher H Bidmead
Editor:Paul Humfress
Production Manager:Margot Hayhoe
Production Assistant:Patricia Greenland
Production Associate:Angela Smith
Assistant Floor Manager:Val McCrimmon
Designer:Malcolm Thornton
Costume Designer:June Hudson
Make-Up Designer:Dorka Nieradzik
Cameraman:Peter Hall
Incidental Music:Paddy Kingsland
Special Sounds (SFX Editor):Dick Mills
Studio Sounds:John Holmes
Lighting:Henry Barber
Visual Effects:John Horton
Title Sequence:Sid Sutton
Title Music:Ron Grainer and the BBC Radiophonic Workshop. Arranged by Peter Howell
Number of Doctors: 2
The Doctors: Tom Baker (The Fourth Doctor) (Regenerates) and Peter Davison (The Fifth Doctor) (Newly Regenerated)
Number of Companions: 3The Companions: Matthew Waterhouse (Adric), Sarah Sutton (Nyssa) and Janet Fielding (Tegan Jovanka) (Joins) Guest Cast: Anthony Ainley (The Master) Additional Cast: Dolore Whiteman (Aunt Vanessa), John Fraser (The Monitor), Tom Georgeson (Detective Inspector), Christopher Hurst (Security Guard),Setting: Logopolis, Barnet, London (28th February 1981), Pharos Project, England (28th February 1981) and outside of time and space. Villain: The Master

The Episodes

No. Episodes Broadcast
(UK)
Duration Viewers
(Millions)
In Archive
550Part 128 February 198124'32"7.1PAL 2" colour videotape
551Part 207 March 198124'03"7.7PAL 2" colour videotape
552Part 314 March 198124'32"5.8PAL 2" colour videotape
553Part 421 March 198125'10"6.1PAL 2" colour videotape

Total Duration 1 Hour 38 Minutes


Audience Appreciation

Average Viewers (Millions) 6.7
Doctor Who Magazine Poll (1998)80.12%  (Position = 19 out of 159)
Doctor Who Magazine Poll (2003)528 Points (Position = 28 out of 159)
Doctor Who Magazine Poll (2009)76.42% Lower (Position = 53 out of 200)
Doctor Who Magazine Poll (2014)77.43% Higher (Position = 62 out of 241)


Archives


 All four episodes exist as PAL 2" colour videotapes.



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Notes


"Logopolis" is the final story for Tom Baker as the Fourth Doctor - his last Doctor Who story after seven years – and the introduction of The Doctor’s new companion Tegan Jovanka, played by Janet Fielding) whilst Nyssa, played by Sarah Sutton and seen in previous story "The Keeper of Traken", returns and joins The Doctor as a companion.

This story picks up soon after the events of "The Keeper of Traken", at the end of which The Master secured a fourteenth incarnation by killing Nyssa’s father Tremas and stealing his body.

Because Script Editor Christopher H Bidmead had been having problems bringing suitable new writers onto Doctor Who, and because he had found the job of script editing very trying, he decided to leave the show at the end of this story, but reluctantly agreed to write the season’s finale himself.

Christopher H Bidmead retained his ties to the show contributing scripts for the Fifth Doctor stories "Castrovalva" and "Frontios". Two further submissions, "In the Hollows of Time" and "Pinacotheca" - were abandoned during the mid-Eighties. Christopher H Bidmead also novelised all three of his televised Doctor Who stories for Target Books.

The Director assigned to this story was Peter Grimwade, who had recently completed "Full Circle".

It was decided only late during production that Nyssa would become a continuing character, so the other new companion, Tegan, was actually cast first; Nyssa does not appear until the second episode and so is not credited for the first episode.

With the recent departure of both Romana and K9 from the show Producer John Nathan-Turner and Script Editor Christopher H Bidmead were keen to find another companion to accompany The Doctor. At the time this story was being produced the character of Nyssa, who had appeared in the previous story "The Keeper of Traken", had not become a regular character.

The idea for The Doctor to have an Australian companion was in the hope that it would make the Australian Broadcasting Company's potential investment in Doctor Who more palatable. Despite this ABC eventually confirmed that they were not interested in a Doctor Who co-production deal with the BBC.John Nathan-Turner and Christopher H Bidmead envisioned the new companion as a bolshy air hostess who would be willing to stand up to The Doctor, but whose forthrightness would privately mask her lack of self-confidence.The name ‘Tegan Jovanka’ came about by accident as John Nathan-Turner suggested two names for the character: Tegan (a Celtic name which John Nathan-Turner selected as homage to the niece of an Australian friend) and Jovanka (inspired by Jovanka Broz, the wife of Yugoslav President Josip Broz Tito). Christopher H Bidmead however, inadvertently interpreted ‘Tegan Jovanka’ as the new companion’s full name, and the error stuck.

The actress chosen to play Tegan was Australian, Janet Fielding who had been recommended to John Nathan-Turner by a friend at the Actors’ Alliance who reckoned that Janet Fielding was a perfect fit to play ‘a bossy Australian’. Janet Fielding had travelled to England in the late Seventies and had worked in theatre before securing a small role in Hammer House of Horror.

The Watcher was played by actor Adrian Gibbs, who was not credited in the Radio Times or on screen.

This story is the second of three stories resurrecting The Doctor's Time Lord arch nemesis, The Master, which was used to bridge the transition from Tom Baker’s version of The Doctor to his successor. The first story in this trilogy was "The Keeper of Traken" and would conclude with the 1981 Fifth Doctor story "Castrovalva" – the story that started Season Nineteen.

This is one of the very first instances of a Doctor Who season having an overall story arc leading up to the season finale. This would become standard practice from 2005 onwards.

This story also concludes a long thread over the preceding season, discussing entropy. In particular, "Logopolis" serves as punctuation to the overarching events of the earlier "E-Space Trilogy".

The exact date of 28 February 1981 for this story is set in the 1981 Fifth Doctor story "Four to Doomsday", as The Doctor is trying to get Tegan to Heathrow in time for her flight. Therefore "Logopolis" and "Four to Doomsday" both happen on the same date. This synchronicity is also shared by the 1966 First Doctor story "The War Machines", the 1967 Second Doctor story "The Faceless Ones", and the first episode of the 1967 Second Doctor story "The Evil of the Daleks", which all occur on the same, unspecified, date in 1966.

The Police Box that The Doctor materialises the TARDIS around, in the first episode, was intended to be the one located at the Barnet bypass, which at the time was one of the last of police boxes in the Metropolitan Police District still in its original location, though it had ceased functioning in the seventies. However, due to it falling into disrepair it was removed in 1981 just prior to the filming of this story. Therefore the TARDIS prop, that had been used until the end of Season Seventeen and which had been placed in storage, was summoned back for use in these sequences.

The lay-by seen at the start of this story was filmed on the southbound side of the A413 Amersham Road, Denham near Gerrards Cross. The lay-by is still there but the M25 motorway now bridges the road where the scene was filmed.

The Watcher appears for the first and only time - a wraith-like intermediate stage between The Doctor’s fourth and fifth incarnations.

The exact nature of the information given to The Doctor and, later, Adric in unheard conversation with The Watcher is never revealed.

After picking up Adric and Nyssa, the Watcher disconnects ‘the entire co-ordinate sub-system’ of the TARDIS, which takes it ‘out of time and space’ - a similar manoeuvre to that seen in the 1968 Second Doctor story "The Mind Robber".

The mystery surrounding the Watcher was felt to be a crucial element to hold the viewers’ interest, and so it was decided to hold off The Master’s first onscreen appearance until episode three, in order to make viewers wonder if the Watcher might actually be the evil Time Lord.

Although The Master does not appear until the third episode, his laughter can be heard in the first two episodes and Anthony Ainley is credited accordingly.

The Master suggests that the Time Lords will not approve of The Doctor’s alliance with him and will cut all ties to him, yet this is never mentioned in any of The Doctor’s latter dealings with them. The DVD information text suggests that this is Christopher H Bidmead’s attempt to write the Time Lords (and the show’s increasingly complex backstory) out of the show altogether, but this was never carried through in subsequent stories.

The Master’s TARDIS is seen disguised as a police box, a tree and an ionic column.

Several elements of this story carry over into "Castrovalva", such as the theme of recursion. In this story this is when The Doctor’s TARDIS materialises around The Master’s TARDIS, thereby creating a recursive loop. A similar process occured in "The Time Monster", yet it does not happen when the TARDIS materialises inside Professor Chronotis’s rooms (actually his TARDIS in disguise) in the untelevised Season Seventeen story "Shada".

There are references to the TARDIS’ faulty Chameleon Circuit and a demonstration of how it could function. The Chameleon Circuit was previously referred to in the 1965 First Doctor story "The Time Meddler", under the name ‘camouflage unit’.

Romana’s room is seen (containing visual references to previous stories, notably "Meglos" and "City of Death"). This is when The Doctor and Adric look at Romana’s now deserted room in the TARDIS and talk about her recent departure in "Warriors' Gate" and decide to postpone their trip to Gallifrey, where The Doctor had been under orders to return his former companion. The Doctor eventually jettisons Romana’s room to escape the pull of The Master’s TARDIS.

The TARDIS cloisters are seen for the first time. The Cloister Bell is described as ‘a sort of communication device reserved for wild catastrophes and sudden calls to man the battle stations’. The Doctor states that the TARDIS was in Gallifrey for repairs when he ‘borrowed’ her stating ‘There were rather pressing reasons at the time'.

According to Christopher H Bidmead, the Logopolitans employ a hexadecimal, or base-16, numerical system, a real system commonly used in computer programming. When Adric and the Monitor read strings of numbers and letters, the letters are actually the numbers between 10 and 15, expressed as single digits.

It is revealed that the Logopolitans are vital to the stability of the Universe. They discovered long ago that the Universe had passed the natural point of total collapse and so used block transfer computation to create Charged Vacuum Emboitements into other universes. The Master’s interference with Logopolis leads to the unravelling of the causal nexus (‘You're interfering with cause and effect’).

The entropy field caused by the destruction of Logopolis also destroys a portion of the universe (Traken and Mettula Orionsis (Traken’s star) are mentioned. It is though fair to assume that other inhabited planets would have suffered the same fate). The Doctor’s transmission of the Logopolis program saves the rest of the Universe, starting with the constellation of Cassiopeia (see the "The Seeds of Doom").

The key plot point of shunting excess entropy into another universe was previously used in Isaac Asimov’s novel "The Gods Themselves".

This story has arguably the largest number of deaths of any Doctor Who story - albeit mostly off-camera - with a significant portion of the entire universe swallowed up by the wave of entropy. At the very least, the Traken Union is destroyed, which would put the death toll in the billions and making The Master a mass murderer of unprecedented proportions. The Last Great Time War potentially had a higher body count, however, even were a death toll to be given, this event occurred off-screen.

The BBC Books’ The Past Doctors Stories novel "The Quantum Archangel", by Craig Hinton, briefly shows an alternate timeline where the destruction of Logopolis did result in the death of the universe. The Doctor Who Unbound audio story "He Jests at Scars... " depicts a timeline in which the Valeyard attempts to undo the events of this story by destroying Logopolis before the Fourth Doctor visited it.

The Central Registry on Logopolis is a duplicate of the Pharos Project on Earth.

The location scenes at the Pharos Project were filmed at a BBC receiving station in Crowsley Park, with a model standing in for the radio telescope and not the Lovell Telescope at Jodrell Bank.

After The Doctor plummeted to his doom from the Pharos Project radio telescope it afforded his companions Adric, Nyssa and new friend Tegan Jovanka the ability to say goodbye as he regenerated.

After his fall, The Doctor regenerates by merging with the Watcher, who is a future projection of The Doctor. This is similar to that of his mentor K’Anpo Rinpoche (in the form of Cho-Je) in the 1974 Third Doctor story "Planet of the Spiders" - The Doctor’s previous regeneration story. This would seem to indicate that a Watcher can merge with another person entirely. A similar Watcher is present in the Fifth Doctor’s mindscape in the "Winter" segment of the Big Finish Productions audio story, "Circular Time".

The lead up to The Doctor’s regeneration, at the conclusion of this story, included two compilations of clips featuring old enemies and friends of The Doctor. John Nathan-Turner was keen to pay tribute to the show’s fanbase, and felt that including these flashbacks – which had never before attempted during the show before – would be exactly what fans of the show would enjoy.

The enemies seen in the first part of this sequence were: a skeletal version of The Master ("The Deadly Assassin" part one), a Dalek ("Destiny of the Daleks" episode four), the Pirate Captain ("The Pirate Planet" part four), a Cyberman ("Revenge of the Cybermen" part three), Davros ("Genesis of the Daleks" part five), a Sontaran ("The Invasion of Time" part five), a Zygon ("Terror of the Zygons" part three) and The Black Guardian ("The Armageddon Factor" part six).

The companions seen in the second part of this sequence were: Sarah Jane Smith ("Terror of the Zygons" part two), Harry Sullivan ("The Sontaran Experiment" part two), The Brigadier ("Invasion of the Dinosaurs" part two), Leela ("The Robots of Death" part one), K9 ("The Armageddon Factor" part two), the first incarnation of Romana ("The Stones of Blood" part one) and the second incarnation of Romana ("Full Circle" part one).

The music from the regeneration scene was later reused for the regeneration of Rowan Atkinson’s Doctor in the 1999 Comic Relief special "Doctor Who and the Curse of Fatal Death".

This sequence was repeated with different music and overdubs as a pre-title sequence before the Fifth Doctor’s first story "Castrovalva".

This story contains a number of errors: When the TARDIS is shrunk, it is first seen without the ‘public use’ placard. Later, as it is wheeled away, the plaque is there; At the beginning of the second episode, when The Doctor and Adric are going back to the TARDIS to escape the policemen, The Doctor opens the door to the right, however Adric goes through a door that is open to the left; Also in the second episode Adric has wet trousers when leaving the TARDIS (which he acquires later when faking his bike accident); When The Master puts the bracelet onto Nyssa's wrist, part of it falls off; In the fourth episode, when The Master enters his TARDIS, his shadow stays after it dematerialises; The Master looking out of the cabin doorway is very obviously a CSO’d still frame; The Doctor’s flashback of The Master is of him saying ‘Predictable as ever, Doctor’ from episode one of the 1976 story "The Deadly Assassin", but The Doctor was not actually present when The Master said that.

This is the last televised story to feature Tom Baker as the Fourth Doctor. He did though appear in the Twentieth Anniversary special "The Five Doctors", but this was only in the form of footage from the uncompleted "Shada".

Tom Baker’s involvement with Doctor Who, after his departure, consisted primarily of a guest shot in the Thirtieth Anniversary Children In Need special "Dimensions in Time", in 1993, as well as his narration of the Season Seventeen cancelled story "Shada" and "The Tom Baker Years" documentary. He first post-Doctor Who role was as Sherlock Holmes in The Hound of the Baskervilles. Tom Baker soon found himself once again in demand, appearing and on television in programmes including Blackadder, The Chronicles of Narnia: The Silver Chair, Medics, the revival of Randall & Hopkirk (Deceased), Monarch of the Glen and as the narrator for Little Britain.

Tom Baker has also narrated a number of Target novelisations of his stories for a range of talking books from BBC Audio. However, despite persistent appeals over the years from Big Finish Productions, Tom Baker has so far refused to record a new appearance as the Fourth Doctor for their range of Doctor Who audio plays. He has though returned to the role for the BBC Hornets’ Nest audio stories, in 2009, and the Demon Quest audio stories, in 2010.

Tom Baker currently holds the record for longest tenure (seven consecutive years) as The Doctor on-screen and he appeared in a total of 178 episodes in 42 stories - although both Sylvester McCoy and Paul McGann would later be considered the ‘current Doctor’ for about nine years each but this was due to the show being off-air for most of the time during their time in the show.

The role of the Fifth Doctor was offered to Peter Davison. One of John Nathan-Turner’s most significant assignments prior to becoming Doctor Who’s producer had been as Production Unit Manager on All Creatures Great and Small, which had already influenced a number of his choices for Doctor Who writers and directors. John Nathan-Turner became aware of a publicity photo of a charity cricket match which included Peter Davison - who had played the part of Tristan Farnon in 65 episodes between 1978 and 1990 - and he realised that the younger and fair-haired Peter Davison was a striking visual contrast to Tom Baker also John Nathan-Turner hoped that fan’s of Peter Davison might follow him to Doctor Who.

The closing titles sequence, used on the final episode, was recompiled with Tom Baker’s face removed from the closing credits and with Peter Davison’s face added for the following story, "Castrovalva".

The final episode of this story was the last time, for the next 24 years, that the lead character was listed in the credits as ‘Doctor Who’ (thus making it the only time Peter Davison was credited as ‘Doctor Who’). Beginning with the next story, "Castrovalva", until the show’s cancellation in 1989, the lead character was credited simply as ‘The Doctor’. The 1996 television film did not have an on-screen credit for the Eighth Doctor, but listed the Seventh Doctor as the ‘Old Doctor’. The 2005 re-launch returned the credit to ‘Doctor Who’ until David Tennant, who played the Tenth Doctor, requested that it reverted back again to ‘The Doctor’ in the 2005 story "The Christmas Invasion".

The fourth episode 4 was the first to credit two actors as playing the lead part when a regeneration scene was involved. This also occurred at the end of the fourth episode of the 1984 story "The Caves of Androzani". In both instances, Peter Davison was billed second.

The two actors playing the lead part were also both credited in the final episodes of the 2005 Ninth Doctor to Tenth Doctor regeneration story "Bad Wolf/The Parting of the Ways" and the 2009/10 Tenth Doctor to Eleventh Doctor regeneration story "The End of Time".

Barry Letts departed at the end of this story as Executive Producer (although he also did some work on the 1982 Fifth Doctor story "Four to Doomsday", the first story of the show’s nineteenth recording block) as it was felt that John Nathan-Turner had enough experience to guide Doctor Who without Barry Letts’ supervision and so the position of Executive Producer was abandoned.

This story was repeated on BBC2 in November/December 1981, as part of "The Five Faces of Doctor Who".



First and Last

The Firsts:

 Peter Davison's first appearance as the Fifth Doctor.

 The introduction of companion Tegan Jovanka played by Janet Fielding.

 The first trip in the TARDIS for new companion Nyssa played by Sarah Sutton.

 The first Doctor Who story where a citizen from Australia travelled with The Doctor.

 The first story to show the TARDIS cloisters.

 The first Doctor Who story to be written by Christopher H Bidmead.


The Lasts (Subject to Future Stories):

 The last story of Season Eighteen.

 Tom Baker's last regular appearance as the Fourth Doctor.

 Christopher H Bidmead' last story as Script Editor.

 Barry Letts' last involvement in the show as Executive Producer.


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The Plot

WARNING: May Contain SpoilersHide Text
The Doctor and Adric with the Police Box
The Doctor and Adric with the Police Box

With the TARDIS’s Cloister Bell tolling of impending doom, The Doctor decides to repair the TARDIS’s chameleon circuit and so travels to Earth to obtain the exact external dimensions of a real police box which he plans to use to correctly reconfigure the outside of the TARDIS.

The TARDIS therefore materialises on a lay-by where The Doctor has located a suitable police box. But while the TARDIS is there a sports car carrying air hostess Tegan Jovanka, who is en-route to her new job, suffers from a flat tyre. After attempting to change the car’s wheel Tegan decides they need assistance so she enters the TARDIS thinking it to be a real police box. Tegan is obviously very confused by what she discovers when she finds herself in the Console Room.

Along with The Doctor and Adric she is unaware that The Master has devised a complex trap for The Doctor and has killed her aunt Vanessa, along with a policeman, using his Tissue Compression Eliminator. The Doctor is also warned of an impending ordeal by a mysterious figure in white, The Watcher, who appears to him several times.

The Watcher
The Watcher

When The Doctor discovers the presence in the car of two shrunken bodies he realises that The Master has escaped from Traken and so must be somewhere near. Unaware that Tegan has entered the TARDIS, The Doctor goes to Logopolis, a planet that is the home to a race of mathematicians whose help he hopes to enlist in reconfiguring the outer shell of the TARDIS. But this goes wrong when, to the horror of his travelling companions, the TARDIS, and there only means to leave Logopolis, begins to shrink with The Doctor trapped inside.

At the same time the mysterious, wraith-like Watcher brings Nyssa from Traken to join them and again warns The Doctor of the impending danger - something that is borne out as The Master, who has hitched a ride in The Doctor’s TARDIS and so is also on Logopolis, starts killing the Logopolitans.

Adric, Tegan and Nyssa
Adric, Tegan and Nyssa

The Master’s meddling however, causes the Logopolitans’ complex block transfer computations to go wrong, culminating in his use of a sound suppressor to prevent the calculations from being spoken at all - the means by which the Logopolitans run their programs.

The Monitor on Logopolis explains that it is only his people’s calculations that are keeping the universe from destruction. He explains that the universe passed its normal heat death years ago, and the Logopolitans’ programs - by way of a signal beamed from a perfect copy of the Pharos Project radio telescope on Earth - have kept open numerous Charged Vacuum Emboitments (CVEs) through which the excess entropy from our universe is draining.

With The Master’s interference, the CVEs will close and the universe will be destroyed. Watching on the TARDIS scanner, Nyssa witnesses her home planet of Traken being destroyed as the entropy begins to take effect. But with the Logopolitans process now halted by The Master’s interference, the Monitor, before turning to dust, reveals that a program contained in the bubble memory of their computers may be able to restore one CVE. The Doctor is therefore forced to join forces with his arch-enemy The Master to prevent the destruction of the universe.

The Doctor with Adric and Nyssa
The Doctor with Adric and Nyssa

The Doctor, accompanied by Adric, Nyssa and Tegan, hurry to the Pharos Project in Cambridge on Earth with a copy of the Logopolitan program. Their plan is to use the real radio telescope to transmit the Logopolitan program and thus keep open the CVEs. While The Doctor’s companions distract the guards, The Doctor and The Master make their way to the control room of the radio telescope and successfully execute the CVE program.

But then The Master sees an opportunity to seize power and promptly blackmails the peoples of the universe by threatening to stop the program, so allowing the destruction of the universe to continue, unless they agree to his demands.

The Doctor goes out onto the gantry of the radio telescope to disconnect the power cable to prevent The Master from carrying out his threat. But The Master, when he realises what The Doctor is attempting to do, causes the gantry to turn so knocking The Doctor off. Even though The Doctor is successful in ending The Master’s threat, he is left hanging precariously on the cable. But eventually he is unable to hang on for any longer and he falls to the ground below.

As he lies injured under the telescope The Doctor is joined by Adric, Nyssa and Tegan who look on as the mysterious Watcher appears once more and approaches The Doctor as he starts to regenerate. Nyssa suddenly realises that The Watcher was the future Doctor all the time. As the companions look on, The Doctor regenerates into a new, younger looking incarnation of The Doctor - so becoming the Fifth Doctor.

 
Nyssa with The Master or Tremas?
Nyssa with The Master or Tremas?
Tegan With the Monitor
Tegan With the Monitor
The Shrunken TARDIS
The Shrunken TARDIS
The Master
The Master
 
The Doctor Hanging On
The Doctor Hanging On
The Moment Has Been Prepared For
The Moment Has Been Prepared For
Regeneration
Regeneration
The Fifth Doctor
The Fifth Doctor




Quote of the Story


 'Never guess. Unless you have to. There's enough uncertainty in the universe as it is.'

The Doctor



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Release Information

FormatTitleRelease Date (UK)Code NumberCover ArtRemarks
Audio
LP
Science-Fiction Sound Effects No. 261981REC 420Sound Effects
Audio
Tape
Science-Fiction Sound Effects No. 261981ZCM 420Sound Effects
Video
VHS
LogopolisMarch 1992BBCV 4736Andrew Skilleter
Video
VHS
The Tom Baker YearsSeptember 1992BBCV 4839PhotoClip only Introduced and commented on by Tom Baker Double cassette release
Video
DVD
LogopolisJanuary 2007BBCDVD 1331Photo-montagePart of the "New Beginnings" box set along with "The Keeper of Traken" and "Castrovalva"
Audio
CD
sci-fi Sound EffectsApril 2013CD release of the Science-Fiction Sound Effects No 26 LP
Video
DVD
LogopolisJune 2013BBCDVD 3801Photo-montagePart of the "Regeneration" Box Set
Audio
CD
The 50th Anniversary CollectionDecember 2013Photo-montageOriginal Television Soundtracks


In Print

FormatTitleRelease Date (UK)PublisherAuthorCover ArtRemarks
Novel
Novel
LogopolisMay 1982Target No. 41Christopher H BidmeadAndrew SkilleterISBN: 0-426-20149-3
Novel
Novel
Logopolis1983Target No. 41Christopher H BidmeadBook: Andrew Skilleter
Box: Photo
Re-released as part of The Fourth Doctor Who Gift Set
ISBN: 0-426-19430-6
Novel
Novel
LogopolisDecember 1991Target No. 41Christopher H BidmeadAlister PearsonVirgin new cover reprint.
ISBN: 0-426-20149-3
CD
CD
LogopolisFebruary 2010Target No. 41Christopher H BidmeadAudio version of the Target Novel read by Christopher H Bidmead.
Doctor Who CMS Magazine (In Vision)Issue 52 (Released: August 1994)
Doctor Who Monthly - Article/FeatureIssue 51 (Released: April 1981)
Doctor Who Monthly - Article/FeatureIssue 53 (Released: June 1981)
Doctor Who Monthly - Article/FeatureIssue 58 (Released: November 1981)
Doctor Who Magazine - ArchiveIssue 109 (Released: February 1986)
Doctor Who Magazine - ArchiveIssue 257 (Released: October 1997)
Doctor Who Magazine - Time TeamIssue 372 (Released: August 2006)
Doctor Who Magazine - The Fact of FictionIssue 406 (Released: April 2009)
Doctor Who DVD FilesVolume 46 (Released: October 2010)

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Photo Gallery


The Doctor and Companions

Tom Baker
The Fourth Doctor

Peter Davison
The Fifth Doctor
   

Matthew Waterhouse
Adric
Sarah Sutton
Nyssa
Janet Fielding
Tegan Jovanka
   




On Release

Audio LP - Sound Effects No. 26
Audio LP - Sound Effects No. 26

BBC
AUDIO
Audio Tape - Sound Effects No. 26
Audio Tape - Sound Effects No. 26

BBC
AUDIO
VHS Video Cover
VHS Video Cover

BBC
VIDEO
Tom Baker Years VHS Video Cover
Tom Baker Years VHS Video Cover

BBC
VIDEO
   
DVD Cover
DVD Cover

BBC
VIDEO
sci-fi Sound Effects
sci-fi Sound Effects

BBC
AUDIO
DVD Box Set
DVD Box Set

BBC
VIDEO
The 50th Anniversary Collection Cover
The 50th Anniversary Collection Cover

BBC
AUDIO
   



In Print

Target Book Cover
Target Book Cover

Target
NOVEL
The Fourth Doctor Who Gift Set
The Fourth Doctor Who Gift Set

Target
NOVEL
Reprinted Virgin Book Cover
Reprinted Virgin Book Cover

Virgin
NOVEL
Target Audio CD Cover
Target Audio CD Cover

BBC
CD
   



Magazines

Doctor Who CMS Magazine (In Vision): Issue 52
Doctor Who CMS Magazine (In Vision): Issue 52

CMS
Doctor Who Monthly - Article/Feature: Issue 51
Doctor Who Monthly - Article/Feature: Issue 51

Marvel Comics
Doctor Who Monthly - Article/Feature: Issue 53
Doctor Who Monthly - Article/Feature: Issue 53

Marvel Comics
   
Doctor Who Monthly - Article/Feature: Issue 58
Doctor Who Monthly - Article/Feature: Issue 58

Marvel Comics
Doctor Who Magazine - Archive: Issue 109
Doctor Who Magazine - Archive: Issue 109

Marvel Comics
Doctor Who Magazine - Archive: Issue 257
Doctor Who Magazine - Archive: Issue 257

Marvel Comics
   
Doctor Who Magazine - Time Team: Issue 372
Doctor Who Magazine - Time Team: Issue 372

Marvel Comics
Doctor Who Magazine - The Fact of Fiction: Issue 406
Doctor Who Magazine - The Fact of Fiction: Issue 406

Marvel Comics
Doctor Who DVD Files: Volume 46
Doctor Who DVD Files: Volume 46

GE Fabbri
   

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