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Peter Davison
The Caves of Androzani
Fifth Doctor Logo


Synopsis


Sharaz-Jek, The Doctor and Peri
Sharaz-Jek, The Doctor and Peri
 Captured for arms-running on the mining planet of Androzani Minor, The Doctor and Perry are under sentence of death. Then a mysterious masked intruder comes to their aid. But is Sharaz Jek, master android creator, really their saviour?

 The rulers of the planet are certainly desperate for his head. But then, he does control Androzani's supply of spectrox and it's a substance men are prepared to die for...

Source: BBC VHS Video


General Information

Season: Twenty One
Production Code: 6R
Story Number: 135
Episode Numbers:619 - 622
Number of Episodes: 4
Percentage of Episodes Held:100%
Working Titles:"Chain Reaction"
Production Dates: November 1983 - January 1984
Broadcast Started: 08 March 1984
Broadcast Finished: 16 March 1984
Colour Status: Colour
Studio: BBC Television Centre (TC6)
Location: Masters Pit (Wareham, Dorset)
Writer:Robert Holmes
Director:Graeme Harper
Producer:John Nathan-Turner
Script Editor:Eric Saward
Editor:Roger Guertin
Production Assistant:Juley Harding
Production Associate:June Collins
Assistant Floor Manager:Sue Hedden
Designer:John Hurst
Costume Designer:Andrew Rose
Make-Up Designers:John Nethercot and Shirley Stallard
Cameraman:John Walker
Incidental Music:Roger Limb
Special Sounds (SFX Editor):Dick Mills
Studio Sounds:Scott Talbott
Lighting:Don Babbage
Visual Effects:Jim Francis and Stuart Brisdon
Title Sequence:Sid Sutton
Title Music:Ron Grainer and the BBC Radiophonic Workshop. Arranged by Peter Howell
Design Effects: Jean Peyre
Number of Doctors: 2
The Doctors: Peter Davison (The Fifth Doctor) (Regenerates) and Colin Baker (The Sixth Doctor) (Newly Regenerated)
Number of Companions: 1The Companion: Nicola Bryant (Peri) Number of Acquaintances: 1The Acquaintance: Christopher Gable (Sharaz Jek) (Joins and Dies) Guest Cast: Anthony Ainley (The Master), Matthew Waterhouse (Adric), Sarah Sutton (Nyssa), Janet Fielding (Tegan Jovanka), Mark Strickson (Turlough), Gerald Flood (Voice of Kamelion) Additional Cast: John Normington (Morgus), Robert Glenister (Salateen), Maurice Roëves (Stotz), Martin Cochrane (Chellak), Roy Holder (Krelper), Barbara Kinghorn (Timmin), David Neal (President), Ian Staples (Soldier)Setting: Planets Androzani Major and Androzani Minor Villains:Morgus and Stotz

The Episodes

No. Episodes Broadcast
(UK)
Duration Viewers
(Millions)
In Archive
619Part 108 March 198424'33"6.9PAL 1" colour videotape
620Part 209 March 198425'00"6.6PAL 1" colour videotape
621Part 315 March 198424'36"7.8PAL 1" colour videotape
622Part 416 March 198425'37"7.8PAL 1" colour videotape

Total Duration 1 Hour 40 Minutes


Audience Appreciation

Average Viewers (Millions) 7.3
Doctor Who Magazine Poll (1998)88.51%  (Position = 3 out of 159)
Doctor Who Magazine Poll (2003)1,541 Points (Position = 1 out of 159)
Doctor Who Magazine Poll (2009)91.64% Higher (Position = 1 out of 200)
Doctor Who Magazine Poll (2014)90.90% Lower (Position = 4 out of 241)


Archives


 All four episodes exist as PAL 1" colour videotapes.



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Notes


This story is considered by many fans as the tour-de-force of 1980’s Doctor Who. It is the final regular on-screen appearance for the Fifth Doctor and so is Peter Davison’s last story. It also marks the first appearance of Colin Baker as the Sixth Doctor and also marks the long-heralded return by writer, and former Doctor Who Script Editor, Robert Holmes to the show.

In the spring of 1983, Script Editor Eric Saward contacted Robert Holmes with the offer to write a story where he would have virtually complete freedom - the only stipulation was that The Doctor would have to regenerate at the story’s end. The story he wrote became "The Caves of Androzani".

This story was the first time Robert Holmes had written for the show since the 1978 Fourth Doctor story "The Power of Kroll", as John Nathan-Turner had been keen to use, wherever possible, writers new to the show.

Robert Holmes created a story outline entitled "Chain Reaction" which was inspired by the 1911 Gaston Leroux novel "The Phantom of the Opera" (in which a mentally unbalanced but brilliant recluse wears a mask to conceal facial disfigurement develops an obsessive fascination with an attractive young woman and eventually abducts her). "The Phantom of the Opera" was also the basis for his earlier 1977 Fourth Doctor story "The Talons of Weng-Chiang"). Another influence for "Chain Reaction" was Frank Herbert’s Dune (where people are killed over a drug that extends life; the unstable ‘tripod of power’ between the rulers of Androzani; the ‘mud blows’ and Androzani Minor's generally arid climate).

In Robert Holmes’ initial scripts The Doctor’s regeneration was a result of wounds from the gunrunners and overall physical exhaustion. Only afterwards was the storyline modified to include The Doctor’s and Peri’s exposure to spectrox toxaemia.

Eric Saward was responsible for two notable additions to Robert Holmes’ scripts. One was the concluding scenes beginning with Peri’s recovery; the other was finally an explanation for The Doctor wearing a stick of celery. In response to a question by Peri, The Doctor reveals that ‘I'm allergic to certain gases in the Praxis range... if the gas is present the celery turns purple’. This allergy however, does not appear to be one shared by any incarnation prior to, or since the Fifth Doctor.

Peter Davison had decided to leave earlier in the year, making this his his third season in the title role. Peter Davison was wary of typecasting, and had been advised by former Second Doctor, Patrick Troughton, that three years in the role should be his limit.

After failing to convince Peter Davison to sign on for one more season, Producer John Nathan-Turner decided to have this story specially written as a regeneration story and for it to air as the penultimate story of Season Twenty One, therefore giving Colin Baker, who would become the Sixth Doctor, a story to end the season. The idea being to give the audience a chance to experience the new Doctor before the long break between seasons. This would just be the second time that a regeneration had occurred mid-season (the other being the regeneration from the First Doctor to the Second Doctor, in the 1966 story "The Tenth Planet", in Season Four).

It has though since been revealed that by the time this story was recorded Peter Davison regretted his choice to leave, having enjoyed many of his scripts for Season Twenty One and especially for this story. Peter Davison has stated that this is his favourite story from his three years on the show and that he particularly enjoyed the script by Robert Holmes and working with director Graeme Harper.

Despite having misgivings about leaving the show it was far too late for him to change his decision, given that contracts had already been signed for Colin Baker who had already been announced to the public as the Sixth Doctor. Peter Davison though continued his prolific career after leaving Doctor Who, including roles in Campion, A Very Peculiar Practice, the feature film Black Beauty and a new series of All Creatures Great and Small. Peter Davison returned, in 1993, to play the Fifth Doctor for the Thirtieth-Anniversary Children In Need special "Dimensions in Time", narrated two novelisations of his stories for release as audio tapes, hosted the video special "Daleks - The Early Years", recorded the unreleased "The Davison Years" special, and appeared on many Big Finish Productions Doctor Who audio stories. In October 2007 He even returned to the show to record a scene, alongside the Tenth Doctor, for the Children In Need special story "Time Crash".

The working title for this story was "Chain Reaction". However, it was also given another title, "The Doctor's Wife", but this was actually a ruse by John Nathan-Turner to find out where information leaks were coming from in his office. He was convinced that fans were somehow getting access to information from his office and so he replaced the entry for "The Caves of Androzani" on his planning board with one for a made-up story. It was not long before reports about "The Doctor's Wife" began appearing in the fan press, confirming his suspicions.

The director assigned to this story was Graeme Harper. Graeme Harper had started in the television business as an actor before later deciding he preferred to work behind the cameras. He came to John Nathan-Turner’s attention when he had worked as an assistant director on the 1981 Fourth Doctor story "Warriors' Gate", and in which he had been instrumental in helping that story’s director, Paul Joyce, complete the required scenes. After completing the BBC’s director’s course Graeme Harper worked on the soap opera Angels amongst other productions, before going freelance and being hired by John Nathan-Turner for this story.

It has been reported that Graham Harper had high hopes with regards to the casting for this story, especially with the role of Sharaz Jek and it has been revealed that Christopher Gable was not the first choice to play the part of Sharaz Jek. Among the actors offered the role were Tim Curry (renowned for playing transvestite Doctor Frankenfurter in the cult classic The Rocky Horror Picture Show), Mick Jagger and even David Bowie! In the end the part went to ballet dancer Christopher Gable, who had originally been approached to play the part of Salateen.

The part of Salateen was played by Robert Glenister. Robert Glenister and Peter Davison had previously played brothers Brian and Steve Webber in the 1980-82 BBC sitcom Sink or Swim.

John Normington (who guest stars as Morgus) later returned to the show as Trevor Sigma in the 1988 Seventh Doctor story "The Happiness Patrol". He also appeared in the 2006 story "Ghost Machine", an episode of the Doctor Who spin-off Torchwood.

One of the soldier extras, played by Steve Wickham, was later to head The Doctor Who Appreciation Society.

After carrying out three days of location filming (at Masters Pit in Wareham, Dorset) in November 1983, studio recording of this story was then interrupted by industrial action - this time by the scenery shifters. John Nathan-Turner therefore decided to allocate the two studio days originally assigned to this story to this season’s final story, "The Twin Dilemma". As a result, recording did not begin until two weeks later, with a three-day session starting on the 15th December.

Other Doctor Who stories adversely affected by the industrial actions of the late 1970s and the 1980s were the 1984 story "Resurrection of the Daleks", which was delayed by a year, and Shada, which was due to be the final story of Season Seventeen but had to be abandoned completely.

Graham Harper however, proved to be a meticulous director, often recording scenes shot-by-shot. As a result, the production soon became badly behind schedule resulting in overruns of fifteen and thirty minutes having to be granted. However, even then it grew apparent that Graham Harper would not be able to complete all the material in time, resulting in two sequences having to be cut. The first was during the opening TARDIS sequence in which The Doctor was to explain to Peri the reason for their visit to Androzani Minor (Apparently, as a boy, The Doctor had started a ‘blown glass bottle collection’ which was made from the sand of different planets. He had lost his Androzani bottle and decided to return there to retrieve some more sand). It was in this scene Peri that was to say ‘You're such a pain, Doctor’. However, when the final cut of the story was made, it was discovered that certain lines of dialogue (like The Doctor professing that ‘I am not a pain and Peri’s comments about needing sand to ‘make some glass’) alluded to the cut sequence. To rectify this, Peter Davison and Nicola Bryant voiced over part of their conversation while the TARDIS materialises from outer space to the planet. The second cut was a major scene from the fourth episode where The Doctor kills the magma beast by tricking it into jumping over the edge of a cliff. However, even with these cuts, recording still finished with only seconds to spare.

The Fifth Doctor’s regeneration, like the Fourth Doctor’s (in the 1981 story "Logopolis"), features a flashback of that incarnation’s companions. However, for the Fifth Doctor’s regeneration, it was decided that special recordings of the Fifth Doctor’s companions would be used instead of stock footage. Aware that so many former cast members would be present for Peter Davison’s wrap party, he asked Eric Saward to script one-line cameo appearances for each of them, to appear as regenerative illusions. Therefore amongst those present on the final studio day were: Matthew Waterhouse (as Adric), Sarah Sutton (as Nyssa), Janet Fielding (as Tegan Jovanka), Mark Strickson (as Vislor Turlough) and Gerald Flood (the voice of Kamelion), as well as Anthony Ainley (as The Master). Initially, it was thought that neither Sarah Sutton (who would have been starring in the theatrical Cinderella had production fallen on its original December date) nor Anthony Ainley would be able to appear. Fortunately, this did not prove to be the case, although Sarah Sutton was suffering from chicken pox at the time.

Janet Fielding, Mark Strickson, Gerald Flood and Anthony Ainley were already under contract to appear in the stories of Season Twenty One. However, special contracts had to be made for Matthew Waterhouse, who had left the show in Season Nineteen, and Sarah Sutton, who had left in Season Twenty. Johnny Byrne, who created the character of Nyssa (in his 1981 Fourth Doctor story "The Keeper of Traken") also had to be paid royalties for the use of the character in this regeneration scene.

Also present on the last day was the new Doctor, Colin Baker who was due to record his lone scene on this day. This is not Colin Baker’s first appearance in the show as he had previously appeared (playing the part of Commander Maxil) in the 1983 story "Arc of Infinity". Ironically in this earlier story Colin Baker has a scene in which he gets to shoot the Fifth Doctor.

Amusingly it has been revealed that it was discovered that Peter Davison’s trousers would not fit Colin Baker’s portlier frame. Consequently, he performed his sequence with them unbuttoned.

A John Peyre is credited for ‘Design Effects' on the fourth episode. This though is a misspelling of the name of Jean Peyre, a Frenchman who created the matte paintings for the shots where The Doctor travels down to obtain the bat’s milk.

If the pre-companion appearance of Nyssa in "The Keeper of Traken" is discounted, this story marks the first occasion since 1977 Fourth Doctor story "Horror of Fang Rock" that The Doctor has spent a complete adventure with only a single companion.

In this story it is revealed that Spectrox is the ‘most valuable substance in the universe’. The raw substance contains a toxic chemical similar to mustard nitrogen. Once refined, it halts the ageing process and offers ‘at least twice the normal life span’. However, Spectrox toxaemia causes cramp, spasms, slow paralysis of the thoracic spinal nerve and finally thermal death. The cure (which contains an anti-vesicant) is the milk of the queen bat discovered by one Professor Jackij.

It seems that The Doctor has been to at least one of the planets of Androzani before, in an untelevised adventure, as he is heard to state that he has been ‘this way before’. He is also heard to say that Androzani Minor ‘hasn't changed’.

Morgus is (or was, before being deposed by Timmin) ‘the richest man in the Five Planets, chairman of the Sirius Conglomerate and a descendant of the first colonists.

It is believed by many fans that when The Doctor is in the control room of Stotz’s space ship, he apparently has a premonition of his coming regeneration when he sees the same patterns as at the story’s conclusion.

The only characters who do not die during this story are Peri and Timmin, both of whom are female. Every male character is seen to die - apart from The Doctor (who does but then regenerates into the Sixth Doctor). The Salateen android is not seen to be destroyed on-screen, but it is not definitely shown as surviving this story’s events (Also it is debatable whether an android would count as being ‘alive’ in the first place).

This story contains a number of errors. Namely: despite the title of this story, The Doctor notes that the caves are in fact blowholes; Peri is seen to bounce after slipping down the cliff-face in the first episode (obviously caused by Nicola Bryant, or her stunt double, hitting a safety cushion of some kind); Krau Timmin’s handheld computer is clearly a television remote control; in the android’s view of The Doctor, his hearts are clearly outside his coat; the sound of the machine guns firing interferes badly with the image on screen. While he is in his office, the character of Morgus frequently breaks the fourth wall by talking directly to camera. This arose through actor John Normington misunderstanding a stage direction; When Stotz eventually cuts through the door the polystyrene is visible on the fake door; When the Fifth Doctor says his last word his mouth did not seem to move.

Peter Davison has joked on several occasions of how he felt ‘upstaged’ by Nicola Bryant (who played Peri) in his last major scene as The Doctor. Before the regeneration hallucination occurs, the Fifth Doctor is seen lying on the floor and his head is resting by Peri, who is kneeling beside him. As he is delivering his last few lines, Nicola Bryant’s loose fitting outfit prominently displays her cleavage.

Despite this distraction The Doctor’s last word is: ‘Adric?’.

This story leads straight into "The Twin Dilemma" and has the Sixth Doctor going through a brief period where he subconsciously blames Peri for his previous self’s death. He tries to distance himself from her while telling himself he’s working towards a greater good, until he finally realises this in the Virgin Books’ The Missing Adventures novel "Burning Heart" written by Dave Stone.

The closing title sequence, in the final episode, included specially-crafted closing titles, featuring the face of Colin Baker, as the Sixth Doctor, and then listing him prior to Peter Davison. This was the first and, to date, only time that the new lead received top billing in the final story of an outgoing Doctor.

Part of Big Finish Productions’ audio story "Circular Time" takes place during/in the lead up to The Doctor’s regeneration – this audio story also gives a much more intimate version of the events at the end of this story.

In the Virgin Books’ The New Adventures novel "Timewyrm: Revelation", written by Paul Cornell, it is revealed that after the Fifth Doctor dies he becomes the mental personification of The Doctor's conscience, but is buried by the Seventh Doctor following his regeneration.

In the BBC Books’ The Past Doctors Stories novel "Matrix", written by Robert Perry and Mike Tucker, an alternate timeline is referenced where the influence of the Dark Matrix - wielded by the Valeyard, The Doctor’s dark future self - provokes the Fifth Doctor to take the bat’s milk himself while leaving Peri to die, turning the Fifth Doctor into a wraith loyal to the Valeyard until the Valeyard’s influence is undone by the Seventh Doctor.

This story was repeated on BBC2 in February and March 1993.

This story was released as the accompanying DVD with issue 36 of the Doctor Who DVD Files in May 2010.

In 2003, in the 40th Anniversary Doctor Who Magazine poll, "The Caves of Androzani" was voted the best Doctor Who story of all time.

In 2009 this accolade was repeated with "The Caves of Androzani" coming ahead of the 2007 Tenth Doctor story "Blink" and the 1975 Fourth Doctor story "Genesis of the Daleks". It was the only Fifth Doctor story to feature in the top ten (the Fourth Doctor had 5 entries while the Ninth Doctor and the Tenth Doctor had 2 each). Earlier in 1998, in a similar poll, this story came third.



First and Last

The Firsts:

 Colin Baker's first appearance as the Sixth Doctor.

 The first, and only, Doctor Who story where the new lead received top billing in the final story of an outgoing Doctor.

 The first Doctor Who story to be directed by Graeme Harper.


The Lasts (Subject to Future Stories):

 Peter Davison's last appearance as the Fifth Doctor.


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The Plot

WARNING: May Contain SpoilersHide Text
Peri and The Doctor
Peri and The Doctor

The TARDIS arrives on the planet Androzani Minor. Examining the ground, The Doctor finds traces of fused silica - evidence of a visiting spacecraft. He also points out to his travelling companion, Peri, a set of tracks leading to and from some nearby caves, which they then visit to investigate further.

Inside the caves Peri slips and falls into a strange sticky substance which makes her legs sting, and The Doctor helps her brush it off with his hands. Moving deeper into the caves, they find piles of weaponry belonging to gun runner Stotz and his hired hand Krelper. They are captured by Captain Rones, who assumes they are gun runners, and has them sent to General Chellak.

The General uses a holographic communicator to report to Morgus back on Androzani Major. Morgus is the head of several conglomerate companies and is involved in funding the war against the gun runners. He seems concerned on learning that some gun runners have been caught, but when he sees The Doctor and Peri he orders that they be shot immediately, despite General Chellak’s feeling that they could be a source of useful information. General Chellak’s conversation with Morgus though has been monitored by a black-garbed and masked figure who takes a fancy to Peri.

Exploring Androzani Minor
Exploring Androzani Minor

Meanwhile Morgus receives the President in his office and gives him some spectrox - a drug that at least doubles the life span of humans. The war is holding up spectrox supplies and the President is considering offering an armistice to Sharaz Jek, the person responsible for it. Morgus is horrified.

Back on Androzani Minor, The Doctor and Peri have been locked in a cell. While preoccupied, when they realise that Peri’s legs and The Doctor’s hands are coming out in blisters, someone enters their cell via a secret door. A little bit later The Doctor and Peri are apparently executed by a firing squad. However, the dead bodies are revealed to be androids. The real Doctor and Peri have in fact been ‘rescued’ by the figure in black, Sharaz Jek. Although attentive to Peri, he is unstable and apparently insane with loathing for Morgus, whom he blames for all his problems. He declares he will stop the war only when he has Morgus’s head delivered to him, and states he has no intention of letting The Doctor and Peri go. Via his communication network, he knows everything that General Chellak is planning and is confident that he can hold out for long enough against the army. The Doctor and Peri meet Salateen, who has been held captive for some time while one of Sharaz Jek’s androids has taken his place at General Chellak’s side.

Awaiting the Firing Squad
Awaiting the Firing Squad

When Salateen discovers that The Doctor and Peri are not well he informs them that they have contracted spectrox toxćmia from touching raw spectrox - deposits from colonies of bats which live deep in the caves under Androzani Minor. Salateen initially tells them that there is no cure but then admits that there is an anti-toxin, discovered by Professor Jackij, which is found in the milk from a queen bat. Unfortunately all the bats have gone to the deep caves, which are devoid of oxygen and prowled by a vicious magma creature. Sharaz Jek also explains that he wears a mask because he was hideously burned when Morgus trapped him in a mud-burst; he was able to get to a baking chamber to escape the mud, but in the process was scalded nearly to death.

Sharaz Jek goes to meet Stotz to argue over the amount of payment for the recent shipment of lost weapons. In his absence, The Doctor is able to disarm the guarding android as it is programmed to recognise humans and his anatomy is different. The Doctor has decided to get the queen bat milk himself but The Doctor is wounded when he, Salateen and Peri are attacked by an android while moving through the caves. Salateen hurries Peri off to General Chellak, and The Doctor then has a close encounter with the magma beast as it attacks Stotz’s party, who have been trying to find Jek’s private store of spectrox.

The Doctor is recaptured by Sharaz Jek who uses his androids to torture him until he discloses where Peri is allowing Sharaz Jek to recapture Peri who is by now very weak indeed. Stotz wants to take The Doctor back with him to Androzani Major and Sharaz Jek agrees. Meanwhile Chellak and Salateen are planning to feed Sharaz Jek disinformation through the android Salateen and through broadcasts to Morgus regarding an attack on a fake location for Sharaz Jek’s base. In this way they hope to catch Sharaz Jek unawares when they mount an attack on him in his true location. Returning to his spacecraft, Stotz reports to his boss back on Androzani Major. It is Morgus. Morgus sees The Doctor on the ship and regards this as proof that the President must suspect him. He therefore kills the President by pushing him down a lift shaft and makes plans to travel to Androzani Minor to negotiate with Sharaz Jek in person.

Sharaz-Jek
Sharaz-Jek

As Stotz’s ship takes off The Doctor manages to free himself and pilot it back to Androzani Minor. The Doctor then races across the surface of Androzani Minor, chased by Krelper and his men, Chellak and Salateen make their way towards Sharaz Jek’s base. Sharaz Jek though has not been fooled at all, however, and the troops are ambushed by his androids. Salateen is killed along with some of the troopers, but General Chellak pushes on. Eruptions on the surface herald the start of a mud-burst and Krelper returns to the spaceship to find Stotz and Morgus in conversation. Krelper is sent away and Morgus offers Stotz a share of the spectrox. He intends to take Sharaz Jek’s private store of the drug and live on another planet in the Sirius system.

Sharaz Jek’s androids are being overrun by General Chellak’s men. Sharaz Jek goes to see if any of them can be repaired, but he too runs into the troops. General Chellak chases Sharaz Jek back to his lab where the two men fight. But in the struggle Sharaz Jek’s mask is pulled off and General Chellak recoils in terror. The distraction allows Sharaz Jek to push General Chellak outside into the path of a mud-burst, where he is killed.

Morgus calls his office and discovers to his horror that his secretary Timmin has taken control of his business - she is now Chairman and Chief Director of Sirius Conglomerates and has given evidence against him. His empire is finished and all his funds have been sequestered. With Morgus no longer in a position of power, Krelper rebels. He wants to return to Androzani Major with the spectrox they already have but Stotz guns him down, along with the remaining gunrunner. He and Morgus then go to the cave system to try to find Sharaz Jek’s spectrox store.

Trau Morgus
Trau Morgus

Sharaz Jek is mourning Peri, who is almost unconscious when The Doctor arrives. The Time Lord borrows an oxygen cylinder from Sharaz Jek and tells him to keep Peri cool while he gets the bat’s milk. While The Doctor is gone, Stotz and Morgus find Sharaz Jek’s lab. Sharaz Jek throws himself at Morgus and forces his head into the path of a laser beam, killing him. Stotz shoots Sharaz Jek but the android Salateen arrives and kills Stotz. As a fire breaks out in the lab, Sharaz Jek dies in the arms of the android Salateen just as The Doctor returns with the milk in time to carry Peri out.

As the planet erupts around him, The Doctor is just able to get back to the safety of the TARDIS and he gives Peri the milk. She recovers quickly but there is none of the antidote left for The Doctor and so he is forced to regenerate to save his own life. As he collapses to the floor of the TARDIS control room and regenerates, a bewildered Peri wants to know what has happened. ‘Change, my dear’ explains the new Doctor. ‘And it seems not a moment too soon’.

 
Behind the Mask
Behind the Mask
The Doctor Comforts Peri
The Doctor Comforts Peri
The Doctor Saves Peri
The Doctor Saves Peri
Tending to The Doctor
Tending to The Doctor
 
Regeneration
Regeneration
Taunting The Doctor
Taunting The Doctor
The Sixth Doctor
The Sixth Doctor
Peri and The Sixth Doctor
Peri and The Sixth Doctor




Quote of the Story


 'You have the mouth of a prattling jackanapes... But your eyes... they tell a different story.'

Sharaz Jek (about The Doctor)



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Release Information

FormatTitleRelease Date (UK)Code NumberCover ArtRemarks
Audio
LP
Doctor Who: The Music II1985REC 552Music score
Audio
Tape
Doctor Who: The Music II1985Music score
Video
VHS
The Caves of AndrozaniJanuary 1992BBCV 4713Andrew Skilleter
Audio
CD
Doctor Who - The Five Doctors - Classic Music From The BBC Radiophonic Workshop Volume 21992FLMCD 710Alister PearsonMusic score
Audio
CD
30 Years at the Radiophonic Workshop1993BBC CD 871Photo-montageSound effects
Audio
CD
The Worlds of Doctor Who1994FLMCD 715Photo-montageMusic score
Video
DVD
The Caves of AndrozaniJune 2001BBCDVD 1042Clayton Hickman
Video
DVD
The Caves of AndrozaniOctober 2010BBCDVD 2806Photo-montageSpecial Edition Part of the 'Revisitations 1' box set Released along with "The Talons of Weng-Chiang" and "Doctor Who: The Movie"
Audio
CD
The Caves of AndrozaniMarch 2013Photo-montageMusic score
Video
DVD
The Caves of AndrozaniJune 2013BBCDVD 3801Photo-montagePart of the "Regeneration" Box Set
Audio
CD
The 50th Anniversary CollectionDecember 2013Photo-montageOriginal Television Soundtracks


In Print

FormatTitleRelease Date (UK)PublisherAuthorCover ArtRemarks
Novel
Novel
The Caves of AndrozaniMarch 1985Target No. 92Terrance DicksAndrew SkilleterISBN: 0-426-19959-6
Novel
Novel
The Caves of Androzani1985Target No. 92Terrance DicksBook: Andrew Skilleter
Box: Andrew Skilleter
Re-released as part of The Eighth Doctor Who Gift Set
ISBN: 0-426-20207-4
Novel
Novel
The Caves of AndrozaniMay 1992Target No. 92Terrance DicksAndrew SkilleterVirgin new cover reprint.
ISBN: 0-426-19959-6
CD
CD
The Caves of AndrozaniNovember 2018Target No. 92Terrance DicksAndrew SkilleterAudio version of the Target Novel read by Peter Davison (The Fifth Doctor).
Doctor Who CMS Magazine (In Vision)Issue 76 (Released: February 1998)
Doctor Who Magazine - PreviewIssue 87 (Released: April 1984)
Doctor Who Magazine - ReviewIssue 90 (Released: July 1984)
Doctor Who Magazine - ArchiveIssue 95 (Released: December 1984)
Doctor Who Magazine - After ImageIssue 199 (Released: May 1993)
Doctor Who Magazine - ArchiveIssue 279 (Released: June 1999)
Doctor Who Magazine - Time TeamIssue 386 (Released: September 2007)
Doctor Who Magazine - The Fact of FictionIssue 551 (Released: June 2020)
Doctor Who DVD FilesVolume 36 (Released: May 2010)

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Photo Gallery


The Doctor and Companion/Acquaintance

Peter Davison
The Fifth Doctor

Colin Baker
The Sixth Doctor
   

Nicola Bryant
Peri
 
Christopher Gable
Sharaz Jek
   




On Release

Audio LP - Doctor Who: The Music II
Audio LP - Doctor Who: The Music II

BBC
AUDIO
Audio Tape - Doctor Who: The Music II
Audio Tape - Doctor Who: The Music II

BBC
AUDIO
VHS Video Cover
VHS Video Cover

BBC
VIDEO
Doctor Who - The Five Doctors CD Cover
Doctor Who - The Five Doctors CD Cover

Silva Screen
AUDIO
   
Sound Effects CD Cover
Sound Effects CD Cover

BBC
AUDIO
Worlds of Doctor Who CD Cover
Worlds of Doctor Who CD Cover

Silva Screen
AUDIO
DVD Cover
DVD Cover

BBC
VIDEO
Revisitations 1 DVD Cover
Revisitations 1 DVD Cover

BBC
VIDEO
   
The Caves of Androzani Music CD Cover
The Caves of Androzani Music CD Cover

BBC
AUDIO
DVD Box Set
DVD Box Set

BBC
VIDEO
The 50th Anniversary Collection Cover
The 50th Anniversary Collection Cover

BBC
AUDIO



In Print

Target Book Cover
Target Book Cover

Target
NOVEL
The Eighth Doctor Who Gift Set
The Eighth Doctor Who Gift Set

Target
NOVEL
Reprinted Virgin Book Cover
Reprinted Virgin Book Cover

Virgin
NOVEL
Target Audio CD Cover
Target Audio CD Cover

BBC
CD
   



Magazines

Doctor Who CMS Magazine (In Vision): Issue 76
Doctor Who CMS Magazine (In Vision): Issue 76

CMS
Doctor Who Magazine - Preview: Issue 87
Doctor Who Magazine - Preview: Issue 87

Marvel Comics
Doctor Who Magazine - Review: Issue 90
Doctor Who Magazine - Review: Issue 90

Marvel Comics
   
Doctor Who Magazine - Archive: Issue 95
Doctor Who Magazine - Archive: Issue 95

Marvel Comics
Doctor Who Magazine - After Image: Issue 199
Doctor Who Magazine - After Image: Issue 199

Marvel Comics
Doctor Who Magazine - Archive: Issue 279
Doctor Who Magazine - Archive: Issue 279

Marvel Comics
   
Doctor Who Magazine - Time Team: Issue 386
Doctor Who Magazine - Time Team: Issue 386

Marvel Comics
Doctor Who Magazine - The Fact of Fiction: Issue 551
Doctor Who Magazine - The Fact of Fiction: Issue 551

Marvel Comics
Doctor Who DVD Files: Volume 36
Doctor Who DVD Files: Volume 36

GE Fabbri
   

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