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Colin Baker
The Ultimate Foe
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Synopsis


The Doctor in The Matrix
The Doctor in The Matrix
 Snatched out of time and place and brought before the Time Lords of Gallifrey, The Doctor is on trial for his life.

 While The Doctor asserts that the evidence of the Matrix, the repository of all Time Lord knowledge, has been tampered with, the mysterious and vengeful prosecuting council, the Valeyard, is confident that The Doctor will be sentenced to death.

 In a dramatic intervention the Valeyard’s true identity is revealed but he escapes from the Courtroom into the Matrix, and it is into this nightmare world that The Doctor must follow - to his face his ultimate foe...



General Information

Season: Twenty Three
Production Code: 7C-2
Story Number: 143d
Episode Numbers:652 - 653
Number of Episodes: 2
Percentage of Episodes Held:100%
Working Titles:"Time Inc." and "Time Incorporated"
Production Dates: June - July 1986
Broadcast Started: 29 November 1986
Broadcast Finished: 06 December 1986
Colour Status: Colour
Studio: BBC Television Centre (TC1)
Location: Camber Sands (Camber, East Sussex), Rye Harbour Nature Reserve (Rye, East Sussex) and Gladstone Pottery Museum (Stoke-on-Trent, Staffordshire)
Writers:Pip and Jane Baker and Robert Holmes (Part 13, uncredited)
Director:Chris Clough
Producer:John Nathan-Turner
Script Editors:Eric Saward (Part 13, uncredited) and John Nathan-Turner (Part 14, uncredited)
Production Assistant:Jane Wellesley
Production Associate:Angela Smith
Assistant Floor Manager:Karen Little
Designer:Michael Trevor
Costume Designer:Andrew Rose
Make-Up Designer:Shaunna Harrison
Incidental Music:Dominic Glynn
Special Sounds (SFX Editor):Dick Mills
Studio Sounds:Brian Clark
Lighting:Don Babbage
Visual Effects:Kevin Molloy
Title Sequence:Sid Sutton and Terry Handley
Title Music:Ron Grainer and the BBC Radiophonic Workshop. Arranged by Dominic Glynn
Number of Doctors: 1
The Doctor: Colin Baker (The Sixth Doctor)
Number of Companions: 1The Companion: Bonnie Langford (Melanie Bush) Number of Acquaintances: 1The Acquaintance: Tony Selby (Sabalom Glitz) (Rejoins and Departs) Guest Cast: Anthony Ainley (The Master), Lynda Bellingham (The Inquisitor), Michael Jayston (The Valeyard) Additional Cast: Geoffrey Hughes (Popplewick), James Bree (Keeper of the Matrix)Setting: Trial Sequences: Time Lord Space Station (Rassilon Era)
Evidence Sequences: The Matrix Villains: The Master and The Valeyard

The Episodes

No. Episodes Broadcast
(UK)
Duration Viewers
(Millions)
In Archive
652Part 1329 November 198624'42"4.4PAL 1" colour videotape
653Part 1406 December 198629'30"5.6PAL 1" colour videotape

Total Duration 54 Minutes


Audience Appreciation

Average Viewers (Millions) 5.0
Doctor Who Magazine Poll (1998)67.18%  (Position = 86 out of 159)
Doctor Who Magazine Poll (2003)320 Points (Position = 47 out of 159)
Doctor Who Magazine Poll (2009)64.54% Lower (Position = 142 out of 200)
Doctor Who Magazine Poll (2014)64.67% Higher (Position = 168 out of 241)


Archives


 Both episodes exist as PAL 1" colour videotapes. A 71-edit scratch print of both episodes also exists as well as a 72-edit and 74-edit of Part 14.



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Notes


"The Ultimate Foe" is the title given to parts thirteen and fourteen, the concluding story of The Trial of a Time Lord - the season-long storyline that constituted Season Twenty Three -, and attempts to wrap up all of the disparate plot threads from the previous twelve episodes.

The working title for this story was "Time Inc." but it is now more popularly identified by the original third segment’s title "The Ultimate Foe". The on-screen title was simply The Trial of a Time Lord.

Part Thirteen was originally written by Robert Holmes. Robert Holmes had originally been asked to write the first four and final six episodes of the season. Robert Holmes agreed to write the first four episodes - which became "The Mysterious Planet" - but as he was not a fan of six-part stories he only agreed to write the final two episodes which would wrap up The Trial of a Time Lord storyline.

Robert Holmes sought inspiration from the novels of Charles Dickens. Namely: the fictional landscape in the Matrix resembles Victorian Britain, and the character (and name) of Mr. Popplewick are strongly Dickensian. The Doctor also quotes the final two lines of "A Tale of Two Cities", prompting Melanie Bush to chide him: ‘Never mind the Sydney Carton heroics!’.

Because of the need to carry out rewrites on his earlier story meant that Robert Holmes had to delay work on the storyline for this story. Unfortunately, the comments made by Head of Drama Jonathan Powell and his ill health meant that Robert Holmes was unable to complete this story. He was only able to complete a draft of Part Thirteen and only a plot outline for Part Fourteen. Unfortunately, the man who was arguably Doctor Who’s most successful writer passed away in May 1986. Therefore Script Editor Eric Saward had to extensively rewrite Part Thirteen after Robert Holmes’ death and to write Part Fourteen himself.

The broadcast version of Part Fourteen, however, was written by Pip and Jane Baker at the last minute, as Eric Saward withdrew his script following a final falling-out with Producer John Nathan-Turner that resulted in Eric Saward’s departure from the show.

Fully aware of the fact that Doctor Who’s future beyond Season Twenty Three was not guaranteed, it was decided that the final episode should feature a cliffhanger conclusion, so that if the show was cancelled, it would end on a particularly significant note. Inspired by the Arthur Conan Doyle novel "The Final Problem", which was supposed to have killed off both Sherlock Holmes and his arch-nemesis Professor Moriarty in a fall over the Reichenbach Falls, The original ending to The Trial of a Time Lord season would have seen The Doctor and The Master locked in combat falling through a ‘time vent’ and seemingly plunging to their deaths as an extra ‘hook’.

However, John Nathan-Turner felt this was too downbeat and believed that it was important that the season did not end on an inconclusive note since it was important after the hiatus to prove the show was back in business. Eric Saward, unhappy at John Nathan-Turner’s comments, decided to leave the show. He also withdrew his permission for the use of his version of Part Fourteen - despite the fact that the locations had already been scouted by director Chris Clough (who was assigned to handle parts nine to fourteen) and rehearsals using his script had already begun.

This resulted in John Nathan-Turner contacting Pip and Jane Baker, who had just completed "Terror of the Vervoids". Already aware that Season Twenty-Three was in dire straits, Pip and Jane Baker agreed to write a new version of Part Fourteen. John Nathan-Turner was able to provide them with a copy of Part Thirteen, but could not reveal any information about Eric Saward’s original Part Fourteen without transgressing copyright law. This resulted in Pip and Jane Baker having to create their own way of tying together all the season’s loose ends. Despite acting as script editor John Nathan-Turner this role, as with the previous story, would go uncredited on the broadcasted episodes.

Not surprisingly, Pip and Jane Bakers’ script differed from Eric Saward’s rewritten Robert Holmes version in several respects. The Master was now more overtly villainous and less of an anti-hero, while the role of the Keeper of the Matrix was significantly reduced (reportedly much to the discontent of James Bree, the actor cast to play him). The Valeyard was now a future regenerative hybrid of The Doctor instead of simply The Doctor’s final incarnation, and was no longer the weak, fearful figure of the earlier draft. Popplewick was now The Valeyard disguise, and instead of holding the court ransom with the time vent, The Valeyard now used a particle disseminator. The new script also ended on an optimistic note, with The Doctor departing for new adventures.

During recording it was found that Part Fourteen was about thirty-eight minutes long. This prompted Chris Clough to cut a number of scenes mostly involving humorous material between The Master and Glitz. Even so Part Fourteen was still around half an hour long - which is five minutes longer than a standard length of an episode. John Nathan-Turner though was able to gain permission for the episode’s slot to be extended by five minutes for the week of its transmission so that most of the recorded material could be retained.

Some stock barrel organ music was used for the scenes featuring Mr. Popplewick’s Fantasy Factory offices. This was ‘Can You Handle This?’, composed by Ken Jones and Keith Grant from an LP called Hymns, Carols, Mechanical Instruments.

Because the final six episodes were being made as though they were a single story, parts nine to twelve were confined to the studio while parts thirteen and fourteen were made principally on location. This took place at Camber Sands at Rye in East Sussex and the Gladstone Pottery Museum in Stoke-on-Trent, Staffordshire - a genuine Victorian pottery.

It was decided by John Nathan-Turner and Eric Saward that The Master should appear in this story, and so Anthony Ainley returned to reprise the role of The Master.

John Nathan-Turner had been impressed by the character Glitz, which Robert Holmes had created for "The Mysterious Planet", and asked that he return for the final story of this season. Therefore Tony Selby (who played Glitz) returned so enabling a tie-in to "The Mysterious Planet" - the opening trial segment. Glitz has done many business deals with The Master, including his mission to steal the Matrix secrets from Ravolox. In this story he becomes a pawn in the struggle between The Master and The Valeyard.

Both Glitz and Melanie Bush (from after The Trial of a Time Lord but before "Dragonfire" (for Glitz) and "Time and The Rani" (for Melanie Bush) are brought to the space station in cabinets by The Master. Melanie Bush hasn’t met The Master or Glitz before.

This story introduces a new Gallifreyan post, Keeper of the Matrix, who carries the Key of Rassilon (see the 1978 Fourth Doctor story "Invasion of Time").

James Bree (who plays The Keeper of the Matrix) had appeared in the 1969 Second Doctor story "The War Games" (though in a different role) which was the first story to feature the Time Lords.

The Valeyard is revealed to be a future evil incarnation of The Doctor himself. In Part Fourteen’s original draft, The Valeyard was actually The Doctor’s final incarnation.

The Valeyard was promised The Doctor’s remaining incarnations by the High Council. He is an amalgamation of all The Doctor’s evil, and is between The Doctor’s twelfth and final incarnation. This distinction though would only be made if The Valeyard is different from The Doctor’s twelfth and thirteenth selves. Thus, he seems to be of the same nature as Cho-Je (see the 1974 Third Doctor story "Planet of the Spiders") or the Watcher (in the 1981 Fourth Doctor story "Logopolis"), a projection of The Doctor’s future self, one which might not be like what the Thirteenth Doctor actually turns out to be. He wants to make The Doctor’s seventh incarnation onwards in his own image, to become the Seventh Doctor.

The Valeyard instead takes over the body of the Keeper of the Matrix (like The Master took over Tremas in of in the 1981 Fourth Doctor story "The Keeper of Traken") - presumably settling to become the next regeneration of this old Time Lord.

It is revealed that sensory overload causes Time Lords to fall into a catatonic state (see the 1974 Third Doctor story "The Monster of Peladon").

The Sixth Doctor and The Valeyard have the same handwriting. Interestingly in the 1989 Seventh Doctor story "Battlefield", The Doctor and Merlin’s handwriting are also the same.

It is revealed that The Master previously entered the Matrix, using a duplicate key, and has been watching the whole trial. His TARDIS, inside the Matrix, is disguised as a beach hut and a statue of Queen Victoria.

The Doctor is heard to comment about the Time Lords when he states to the court ‘In all my travelling throughout the universe I have battled against evil, against power mad conspirators. I should have stayed here. The oldest civilisation: decadent, degenerate, and rotten to the core. Power mad conspirators, Daleks, Sontarans... Cybermen, they're still in the nursery compared to us. Ten million years of absolute power. That's what it takes to be really corrupt’.

At the end of this story The Doctor is also asked to stand again for Lord President but he refuses (see also the 1976 Fourth Doctor story "The Deadly Assassin" and the Twentieth Anniversary special "The Five Doctors").

The very last scene has The Valeyard breaking the fourth wall by looking directly into the camera and laughing.

This is the last onscreen appearance of the Time Lords for twenty three years. Apart for a brief flashback, in the 2007 Tenth Doctor story "The Sound of Drums/Last of the Time Lords", they would not be shown again until the 2009/2010 Tenth Doctor story "The End of Time".

In keeping with the more optimistic ending John Nathan-Turner decided to amend the script at the last minute to show how Peri had not died as shown in "Mindwarp" but had in fact survived and was now happily married to King Yrcanos – so making her apparent death a part of The Valeyard’s tampering with the Matrix. A slow-motion clip from "Mindwarp" was used to show this.

It is The Master who reveals Peri’s true fate after The Doctor’s removal from time in Part Eight. He does not reveal this to The Doctor, but to the open court in The Doctor’s absence, in answer to a query by The Inquisitor. Also although The Inquisitor commented knowledgeably on events involving King Yrcanos and the seeming death of Peri, it is revealed here that she was apparently unaware that some actions and consequences did not occur in the way presented to the court.

Nicola Bryant was disappointed to learn how the fate of her character had been changed.

Virgin Books’ The New Adventures novel "Bad Therapy", written by Matthew Jones, includes an account of when Peri encounters The Doctor again.

Thanks to the paradoxes of time travel, since Melanie Bush is from The Doctor’s future, she has already met him, but from The Doctor’s perspective he is meeting her for the first time. Most spin-off media, including the Target novelisation by Pip and Jane Baker, have assumed that The Doctor, at the end of his trial, takes Melanie Bush back to her proper place in time and eventually travels to her relative past to meet Melanie Bush for the first time from her perspective. That meeting, never seen on screen, is related in the BBC Books’ The Past Doctors Stories novel "Business Unusual", written by Gary Russell, and also in the Big Finish Productions Unbound audio story "He Jests at Scars..." which provides a semi-sequel to this story.

This story marked the final appearances of The Inquisitor and The Valeyard as recurring characters.

Michael Jayston returned to play an alternate version of The Valeyard in "He Jests at Scars...". The Valeyard has also featured in a number of novels (including Virgin Books’ The New Adventures and The Missing Adventures and BBC Books’ The Past Doctors Stories range) – Namely "Matrix", and, in a sense, "Millennial Rites" and "Head Games"", a variation of him also appeared in the 2010 Eleventh Doctor story "Amy's Choice". The Valeyard’s origins are also explored in the unlicensed charity release novel "Time's Champion".

The Inquisitor is never given a formal name, but Lynda Bellingham reprised the role - as Inquisitor Darkel - in Big Finish Prodoctions Gallifrey audio series - appearing in most of the episodes.

Glitz is presumably sent home while The Master is to be punished - but presumable escapes.

Whereas previously Anthony Ainley had appeared, as The Master, in at least one story per year since Season Eighteen, it would be another three years before he returned for the last time in the 1989 Seventh Doctor story "Survival", the final story of the show’s original run. Information about his escape is provided in Virgin Books’ The Missing Adventures novel "State of Change", written Christopher Bulis.

What happens to Earth is never explained. The Time Lords might put it back into its original location, or even prevent it from ever having been moved in the first place.

In the 2008 Tenth Doctor story "The Stolen Earth/Journey's End", a Magnetron is used to move a number of planets to another spot in the universe. Since then, the technology appears to have been modified and/or improved as the planets apparently just teleport rather than being ‘thrown’.

This was Colin Baker’s final appearance during the original run of the show (though he was unaware of it at the time of filming). When Season Twenty Four was commissioned, he was sacked by BBC executives who blamed him (unfairly) for the lower ratings. Colin Baker was offered the chance to appear as in all four episodes of the first story of Season Twenty Four, but he declined this and the invitation to return for the traditional regeneration sequence in "Time and The Rani" - deciding instead that it was best, from both a personal and a professional perspective, to make a clean break from Doctor Who.

Colin Baker later returned, as the Sixth Doctor, in 1989 when he replaced Jon Pertwee in the stage play "Doctor Who: The Ultimate Adventure". He also took part in the Thirtieth-Anniversary Children In Need special "Dimensions in Time", in 1993. Colin Baker also created the role of ‘the Stranger' for Bill Baggs Videos (BBV) as well as appearing on the "Colin Baker Years" and "Cybermen: The Early Years" tapes. He has also reprised the role of the Sixth Doctor in the Big Finish Productions Doctor Who audio range.

The Target novelisation, published in September 1988, differs from the televised adventure. In the novel The Master says ‘The Valeyard, Doctor, is your penultimate reincarnation ... Somewhere between your twelfth and thirteenth regeneration...and may I say you do not improve with age...’. As televised The Master’s line is ‘The Valeyard is an amalgamation of the darker sides of your nature, somewhere between your twelfth and final incarnation...and may I say you do not improve with age...’. The Master also explains how he survived his previous adventure ("The Mark of The Rani").



First and Last

The Lasts (Subject to Future Stories):

 The last story of Season Twenty Three.

 Colin Baker's last appearance as the Sixth Doctor.

 The last appearance in the show for The Valeyard played by Michael Jayston.

 The last onscreen appearance of the Time Lords for twenty three years.

 The last Doctor Who story to be written by Robert Holmes.

 Eric Saward's last involvement in the show as Script Editor.


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The Plot

WARNING: May Contain SpoilersHide Text
The Doctor on Trial
The Doctor on Trial

In the courtroom, aboard the Time Lord’s space station, The Doctor’s trial reaches its conclusion. With all the evidence complete The Doctor accuses The Valeyard’s evidence of being a farrago of lies and he maintains that the Matrix has been tampered with.

The Inquisitor therefore calls the Keeper of the Matrix into the Court but he denies that the Matrix can be tampered with as The Doctor has alleged. He states that entry into the Matrix can only be achieved with the Key of Rassilon, which he alone holds. The Inquisitor therefore has no choice but to accept The Valeyard’s argument that The Doctor’s allegation is unsubstantiated. Yet The Doctor continues to insist that the evidence has been deliberately tampered with by someone who wants him dead. Someone such as The Valeyard.

Meanwhile two coffin-like containers arrive at the space station. Inside the pods are Glitz and Melanie Bush, who enter the courtroom. Glitz states that he has been sent here to assist, and when The Inquisitor asks by whom, the reply comes from the Matrix screen. An image of The Master appears, proof that the Matrix can indeed be breached as The Master has a copy of the Key of Rassilon. The Master wants Glitz to testify, so The Doctor asks him about the secrets. Glitz reveals that the Sleepers from Andromeda had been stealing secrets from the Matrix while based on Earth. The Master confirms this and goes on to explain that the High Council of Time Lords used a magnetron to throw Earth across space, causing the fireball which devastated it. They then arranged for the planet to be renamed Ravolox, so as to divert suspicion from themselves.

Mel and Glitz
Mel and Glitz

The Master also reveals that, fearing that The Doctor would discover the truth, the High Council has made a deal with The Valeyard to the effect that he would receive The Doctor’s remaining regenerations upon The Doctor’s execution. The Master also reveals that The Valeyard is an amalgamation of The Doctor's darker side, somewhere between his twelfth and final incarnation.

Having his true identity revealed, The Valeyard flees into the Matrix through the Seventh Door, which is located just outside the courtroom. The Doctor pursues him into the Matrix, taking Glitz with him, followed by Melanie Bush. Inside the Matrix they find themselves in a Dickensian fantasy world created by The Valeyard. After many deceptions, he confronts his future self, who has disguised himself as a clerk named Popplewick who works in the Fantasy Factory.

The Inquisitor
The Inquisitor

The Doctor realises that The Valeyard intends to wipe out all the Time Lords present at the trial by using a device that Melanie Bush recognises as a megabyte modem. The Doctor though corrects her as it is in fact a maser. The Valeyard is using it as a particle disseminator, with which he plans to murder all the members of the court through the matrix screen in the courtroom.

Back in the courtroom, the Keeper of the Matrix informs The Inquisitor that the High Council has been deposed and there is insurrection on Gallifrey. The Master then appears on the matrix screen to give an edict. He offers to impose order with his control over the Matrix, but anyone who disobeys him will be executed. In his TARDIS, he loads the Matrix secrets master tape into the time machine’s systems, but his plans are halted when he discovers that the tape has been booby-trapped with a Limbo Atrophier, which causes both he and Glitz to be pushed back against the TARDIS walls, unable to move.

Meanwhile in the Matrix, The Doctor induces an anti-phase signal in the telemetry unit, causing the particle disseminator to backfire. Melanie Bush has already gone back to the courtroom to warn the Time Lords of the impending danger. The Inquisitor though informs her that the screen cannot be switched off without the Keeper of the Matrix present, so Melanie Bush tells them to run for their lives as balls of energy shoot from the matrix screen where the Time Lords are cowering.

The Master
The Master

The Doctor believes he has set the machine to self-destruct but The Valeyard tells him that it will in fact feedback into the Matrix. Balls of energy start to swirl around the Fantasy Factory – one of which forces The Valeyard to collapse over the maser. Shortly after The Doctor flees from the Fantasy Factory it explodes and The Valeyard is apparently killed in the back-blast.

With the danger over, The Doctor returns to the courtroom, where The Inquisitor informs him that all charges against him have now been dropped. She is also able to reveal to him that, contrary to what was seen in the trial evidence, Peri was not killed on Thoros-Beta but is now Yrcanos’s Queen.

As The Doctor prepares to leave, The Inquisitor invites him to stand once again for the President of Gallifrey. He declines by suggesting that The Inquisitor should stand instead. He then asks that when The Master and Glitz are recovered, that the Time Lords show some leniency towards Glitz. He then departs, along with Melanie Bush, in the TARDIS - with Melanie Bush threatening The Doctor with a regime of strict exercise and carrot juice.

As The Inquisitor leaves the court she asks the Keeper of the Matrix to arrange all necessary repairs. However, when the Keeper turns he is revealed to be The Valeyard…

 
Popplewick
Popplewick
The Valeyard
The Valeyard
The Keeper of The Matrix
The Keeper of The Matrix
The Doctor and Popplewick
The Doctor and Popplewick
 
The Doctor is Consumed
The Doctor is Consumed
The Master
The Master
The Valeyard
The Valeyard
Queen Peri and King Yrcanos
Queen Peri and King Yrcanos




Quote of the Story


 'In all my travelling throughout the universe, I have battled against evil, against power-mad conspirators. I should have stayed here. The oldest civilisation: decadent, degenerate, and rotten to the core. Power-mad conspirators, Daleks, Sontarans, Cybermen - they're still in the nursery compared to us. Ten million years of absolute power. That's what it takes to be really corrupt.'

The Doctor



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Release Information

FormatTitleRelease Date (UK)Code NumberCover ArtRemarks
Audio
Tape
Black Light: The Doctor Who Music of Dominic Glynn1985RDMP2Music score
Audio
CD
30 Years at the Radiophonic Workshop1993BBC CD 871Photo-montageSound effects
Video
VHS
The Ultimate FoeOctober 1993BBCV 5009Part of the "The Trial of a Time Lord" Box set containing all 4 "The Trial of a Time Lord" stories Released on 3 cassette in a TARDIS shaped tin (BBCV 5008)
Video
VHS
The Colin Baker YearsMarch 1994BBCV 5324PhotoClip only Introduced and commented on by Colin Baker
Video
DVD
The Ultimate FoeSeptember 2008BBCDVD 2422Part of the "The Trial of a Time Lord" Box set
Audio
CD
The 50th Anniversary CollectionDecember 2013Photo-montageOriginal Television Soundtracks
Video
Blu-Ray
Doctor Who: The Collection - Season 23 (Limited Edition)September 2019BBCBD 0471Photo-montageBlu-Ray Limited Edition boxed set containing 4 specially restored stories


In Print

FormatTitleRelease Date (UK)PublisherAuthorCover ArtRemarks
Novel
Novel
The Ultimate FoeSeptember 1988Target No. 131Pip and Jane BakerAlister PearsonISBN: 0-426-20329-1
CD
CD
The Ultimate FoeOctober 2013Target No. 131Pip and Jane BakerAlister PearsonPart of "The Trial of a Time Lord - Volume 2" CD Audio Set. Audio version of the Target Novel read by Michael Jayston (The Valeyard).
Doctor Who CMS Magazine (In Vision)Issue 89 (Released: April 2000)
Doctor Who Magazine - PreviewIssue 118 (Released: November 1986)
Doctor Who Magazine - ReviewIssue 123 (Released: April 1987)
Doctor Who Magazine - Time TeamIssue 400 (Released: October 2008)
Doctor Who Magazine - The Fact of FictionIssue 552 (Released: July 2020)
Doctor Who Magazine Special - Archive1992 Winter Special (Released: 1992)
Doctor Who DVD FilesVolume 132 (Released: January 2014)

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Photo Gallery


The Doctor and Companion/Acquaintance

 
Colin Baker
The Sixth Doctor

   

Tony Selby
Sabalom Glitz
 
Bonnie Langford
Melanie Bush
   




On Release

Audio Tape - Black Light
Audio Tape - Black Light

BBC
AUDIO
Sound Effects CD Cover
Sound Effects CD Cover

BBC
AUDIO
VHS Box Set
VHS Box Set

BBC
VIDEO
Colin Baker Years VHS Video Cover
Colin Baker Years VHS Video Cover

BBC
VIDEO
   
DVD Cover
DVD Cover

BBC
VIDEO
The 50th Anniversary Collection Cover
The 50th Anniversary Collection Cover

BBC
AUDIO
The Collection Season 23 Limited Edition Blu-Ray Cover
The Collection Season 23 Limited Edition Blu-Ray Cover

BBC
VIDEO



In Print

Target Book Cover
Target Book Cover

Target
NOVEL
 
Target Audio CD Cover
Target Audio CD Cover

BBC
CD
   


Magazines

Doctor Who CMS Magazine (In Vision): Issue 89
Doctor Who CMS Magazine (In Vision): Issue 89

CMS
Doctor Who Magazine - Preview: Issue 118
Doctor Who Magazine - Preview: Issue 118

Marvel Comics
Doctor Who Magazine - Review: Issue 123
Doctor Who Magazine - Review: Issue 123

Marvel Comics
Doctor Who Magazine - Time Team: Issue 400
Doctor Who Magazine - Time Team: Issue 400

Marvel Comics
   
Doctor Who Magazine - The Fact of Fiction: Issue 552
Doctor Who Magazine - The Fact of Fiction: Issue 552

Marvel Comics
Doctor Who Magazine Special - Archive: 1992 Winter Special
Doctor Who Magazine Special - Archive: 1992 Winter Special

Marvel Comics
Doctor Who DVD Files: Volume 132
Doctor Who DVD Files: Volume 132

GE Fabbri


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