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Matt Smith
Nightmare in Silver
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Synopsis


Nightmare in Silver
Nightmare in Silver
 Welcome to Webley's World of Wonders! Roll up, roll up. Miracles, marvels and more await you.

 The wonder of the age. The miracle of modernity. They were defeated a thousand years ago, but now they're back to destroy you. So fast so smart, and so strong that fighting them is suicidal. Nightmares in silver! Ladies and gentlemen, behold - the 699th wonder of the universe - the Cybermen!

 As you've never seen them before…



General Information

Season: Thirty Three (New Series 7)
Production Code: 7-13
Story Number: 238 (New Series: 82)
Episode Number:797 (New Series: 101)
Number of Episodes: 1
Percentage of Episodes Held:100%
Working Titles:"The Last Cyberman" and "The Saviour of the Cybermen
Production Dates: November 2012
Broadcast Date: 11 May 2013
Colour Status: HD Colour
Studio: BBC Wales (Roath Lock Studios, Cardiff)
Location:
Writer:Neil Gaiman
Director:Stephen Wolfenden
Producer:Denise Paul
Series Producer:Marcus Wilson
Executive Producers:Caroline Skinner and Steven Moffat
Assistant Directors:Gareth Jones and Louisa Cavell
Script Supervisor:Steve Walker
Script Editor:John Phillips (Assistant)
Editor:Iain Erskine
Production Executive:Julie Scott
Production Manager:Phillipa Cole
Production Assistant:Rachel Vipond
Post Production Supervisor:Nerys Davies
Production Designer:Michael Pickwoad
Director of Photography:Tim Palmer BSC
Casting Director:Andy Pryor CDG
Line Producer:Des Hughes
Costume Designer:Howard Burden
Make-Up Designer:Barbara Southcott
Cameramen:Cai Thompson (Assistant), Meg De Koning (Assistant), Sam Smithard (Assistant) and Joe Russell (Operator)
Incidental Music:Murray Gold
Special Sounds (SFX Editor):Paul Jefferies
Sound Recordist:Deian Llyr Humphreys
Visual Effects:Stargate Studios
Special Effects:Real SFX
Prosthetics:Millennium FX
Stunt Co-ordinators:Crispin Layfield and Gordon Seed
Stunt Performer:Ryan Stuart
Title Sequence:Frame Store
Title Music:Ron Grainer and the BBC Radiophonic Workshop. Arranged by Murray Gold
Choreographer: Alisa Berk
The Cybermen Created By: Kit Pedler and Gerry Davis
Music Performed By: The BBC National Orchestra of Wales
Music Conducted and Orchestrated By: Ben Foster
Music Mixed By: Jake Jackson
Music Recorded By: Gerry O'Riordan
Number of Doctors: 1
The Doctor: Matt Smith (The Eleventh Doctor)
Number of Companions: 1The Companion: Jenna-Louise Coleman (Clara Oswald) Guest Cast: Warwick Davis (Porridge), Tamzin Outhwaite (Captain) Additional Cast: Eve de Leon Allen (Angie), Kassius Carey Johnson (Artie), Jason Watkins (Webley), Eloise Joseph (Beauty), Will Merrick (Brains), Calvin Dean (Ha-Ha), Zahra Ahmadi (Missy), Aidan Cook (Cyberman), Nicholas Briggs (Voice of the Cybermen)Setting: Hedgewick's World of Wonders Villains: Cybermen, Cybermites and Mr Clever

The Episodes

No. Episodes Broadcast
(UK)
Duration Viewers
(Millions)
In Archive
797Nightmare in Silver11 May 201344'33"6.6Yes

Total Duration 45 Minutes


Audience Appreciation

Average Viewers (Millions) 6.6
Doctor Who Magazine Poll (2013)68.10%  (Position = 7 out of 9)
Doctor Who Magazine Poll (2014)59.32% Lower (Position = 203 out of 241)


Archives


 This story exists and is held in the BBC's Film and Videotape Library.



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Notes


This is the second story written by Neil Gaiman whose first Doctor Who story, "The Doctor's Wife", won the 2012 Hugo Award for the Best Dramatic Presentation, Short Form.

This story features the return of the long-standing Doctor Who villains, the Cybermen. These iconic villains made their debut in 1966 First Doctor story "The Tenth Planet" and they most recently appeared in the 2011 story "Closing Time".

The Cybermen in this story introduce a dramatic evolution to the Cyberman race employing a multitude of new abilities that replace the previous design they had maintained since their return, in the revived show, in the 2006 Tenth Doctor story "Rise of the Cybermen/The Age of Steel".

The previous design of the Cybermen also appear in this story, but are not the primary threats.

Executive Producer Steven Moffat has revealed that the Cybermen were redesigned because they did so often in the show, before it was revived in 2005, but so far they had been consistent in the revived series. The evolution of the Cybermen has been occurring for decades. In "The Tenth Planet" their bodies appeared to be a combination of cloth and metal. They looked markedly different in their following story, "The Moonbase", and have evolved in virtually all their subsequent stories.

Likewise, the Cybermats have also evolved with their progenitors into a more compact form known as Cybermites.

Neil Gaiman has revealed that he was motivated to provide a ‘rationalisation’ for the Cybermen in current Doctor Who continuity. Before the show was revived in 2005 the Cybermen were depicted as alien cyborgs, while the revived series depicted them as human upgrades from a parallel Earth. Neil Gaiman opined that his Cybermen stemmed from an encounter and amalgamation of these two types of Cybermen following the 2008 Christmas special "The Next Doctor".

‘Cybermen were always the monsters that scared me the most’, Steven Moffat has stated. ‘Not just because they were an awesome military force, but because sometimes they could be sleek and silver and right behind you without you even knowing’.

Neil Gaiman has revealed that when Steven Moffat contacted him, about writing for the show and asked him to make the Cybermen ‘scary again’, he decided to ‘take the 1960s Cybermen and everything that's happened since. I thought back to when I was six or seven year's old - "The Moonbase" and "The Tomb of the Cybermen". I saw those when they were first broadcast’. However, Neil Gaiman has also revealed that he ‘got completely side-tracked by a mad, strange romp’.

Matt Smith has stated ‘I think it will be a fan's favourite because, well, without giving anything away, it just will be, because there's something in it... Neil's brilliant ideas will always add a level to Doctor Who, which will be interesting’.

This story has attracted a guest-cast of familiar television and film actors: Tamzin Outhwaite is best known for her role as Melanie Owen in BBC One soap opera EastEnders between 1992 and 2002, and has gone on to star in many television dramas including Hotel Babylon.

Jason Watkins, who played Webley, played villain Herrick in the first series of Being Human (created by Doctor Who writer Toby Whithouse) and currently stars in the Sky One sitcom Trollied. In 2009 he played The White Guardian in the Big Finish Productions Key2Time audio trilogy with Peter Davison.

The cast is also joined by Warwick Davis playing the part of Porridge. He has appeared in films such as Return of the Jedi, The Hitch-Hiker's Guide to the Galaxy and, as Professor Flitwick, in the Harry Potter films. He was also the star of the Ricky Gervais comedy series Life's Too Short.

Appropriately enough for a writer noted for his spooky stories, the read through for this story took place in Cardiff on Halloween (Wednesday 31st October 2012) and recording on the story began one week later on 7th November 2012.

Some location filming took place in early November 2012 at Castell Coch. It has been revealed that during this time, a copy of the read-through script was found in a taxi in Cardiff. It was marked as being Eve De Leon Allen's copy with the working title of "The Last Cyberman". After appearing in a photo, posted on Facebook, it was eventually returned to the BBC.

This story is directed by Doctor Who newcomer Stephen Woolfenden, who has previously worked as an assistant or second unit director on shows such as Neverwhere, State of Play and Strike Back, as well as feature films such as the last four Harry Potter movies.

This story's title, "Nightmare in Silver", is reminiscent of the Twenty Fifth Anniversary Cyberman story, "Silver Nemesis". In both cases the Silver is referring to Cybermen.

Calvin Dean, who plays Ha-Ha, is no stranger to the world of Doctor Who. He appeared in The Sarah Jane Adventures back in 2009, playing the part of Chris, in the two-part story "The Gift".

Angie and Artie Maitland travel in the TARDIS for the first time - as they had previously blackmailed Clara into taking them on a trip in The Doctor's time machine at the end of "The Crimson Horror".

The ‘six hundred and ninety-ninth Wonder of the Universe’ is how Webley describes the chess-playing Cyberman. The Wonders of the Universe were referenced by The Doctor in the 1974 Third Doctor story "Death to the Daleks". He explained there were 700 of them, but as one - the City of the Exxilons - was destroyed, in the last part of that story and he ruefully reflected, ‘…the universe is down to six hundred and ninety nine Wonders!’.

Listen out for the line ‘The Cyber-Planners built a Valkyrie…’. In Norse mythology the Valkyries (or simply valkyries) were magical maidens who selected dead warriors, killed in combat, taking them from the battlefield to be brought back to life in order to fight alongside gods. The name literally means ‘chooser of the slain’ and they were tied in with the stories of Ragnarok. Coincidentally, The Doctor fought the so-called Gods of Ragnarok in the 1988 Seventh Doctor story "The Greatest Show in the Galaxy".

When The Doctor calls Clara, ‘A mystery wrapped in an enigma, squeezed into a skirt that’s just a little bit too tight…’ he is misquoting Winston Churchill. In a BBC broadcast, in October 1939, Winston Churchill declared, ‘I cannot forecast to you the action of Russia. It is a riddle wrapped in a mystery inside an enigma; but perhaps there is a key. That key is Russian national interest’.

The Captain mentions a ‘solid state, sub-etha ansible class communicator’. This is a reference to sub-etha technology from The Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams, a former Doctor Who script editor. Neil Gaiman, the author of this story, wrote Don't Panic: The Official Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy Companion.

The area where the TARDIS materialises resembles the lunar surface it landed on in the 1967 Second Doctor story "The Moonbase". In fact the name of that story is referenced when Artie notes ‘This is like a Moonbase or something…’.

The Doctor previously visited an amusement venue controlled by aliens in the 1988 Seventh Doctor story "The Greatest Show in the Galaxy".

Angie's mobile phone has no service, indicating that The Doctor didn't give her a super-phone, as he had with every one of his regular companions since his ninth incarnation (see "The End of the World", "42", "The Doctor's Daughter", "Dinosaurs on a Spaceship"). She is given a new phone from the TARDIS at the end, although it isn't clear whether or not this is a super-phone.

The scene where the Cyberman snatches Angie uses a camera technique called Bullet Time, popularised in the science fiction film The Matrix. In this instance it’s used to make it appear that the Cyberman is moving with incredible rapidity with his speed contrasted by the near stillness of the humans, The Doctor and even laser bolts that seem frozen in mid-air.

The Doctor is heard saying to a Cybermite, ‘Hardly a Cybermat’ - a reference to the cyber-rodents he encountered in "The Tomb of the Cybermen", "The Wheel in Space", "Revenge of the Cybermen" and "Closing Time".

Whilst under possession by the Cyber-Planner, The Doctor is heard mimicking the Ninth Doctor's accent and catchphrase of ‘Fantastic’, as well as the Tenth Doctor's of ‘Allons-y’.

The Cyber Planner/Plotter first appeared in two Second Doctor stories, "The Wheel in Space" and "The Invasion", though in those instances it was a stationary mechanical device.

The mindscape scene where The Doctor talks with his cyber-self is similar to the scene from the Radio Times comic strip "Dreadnought" where the Eighth Doctor battles a cyber version of himself inside his mind when the cybermen attempt to convert him.

When The Doctor lets the Cyber-Doctor access his mind all ten of his previous incarnations appear, including the Tenth Doctor's regeneration into the Eleventh Doctor that took place at the end of the 2009/10 story "The End of Time". Each image of the previous incarnations were taken from photographic stills that were used as promotional material during the respective actors' tenures.

Also during this sequence The Doctor claims that he can regenerate at will and when describing the state of the neurons in The Doctor's brain, the Cyber-Planner says he has had ‘ten rejigs’ - i.e. ten regenerations.

It is suggested that The Doctor and Clara meet on Wednesdays for their travels, as opposed to Clara being in residence aboard the TARDIS.

When playing chess against the Cyber-Planner, The Doctor is heard to reveal that the Time Lords invented chess.

The Doctor also played chess in "The Sun Makers", "The Androids of Tara", "The Curse of Fenric" and "The Wedding of River Song". Also, the Time Lords inventing chess was a query first considered by the Second Doctor in the BBC Books' The Past Doctors Stories novel "Dreams of Empire".

The Doctor's defeat of the Cyber-Planner, distracting him with a bluff about an alleged checkmate to drain his power, is the same stratagem he used against Fenric the in 1989 Seventh Doctor story "The Curse of Fenric".

The Doctor has a ‘Golden Ticket’ for Hedgewick's World of Wonders - possibly a nod to the Golden Tickets from Roald Dahl's Charlie and the Chocolate Factory. Webley's costume of a top hat and cane is also similar to what Willy Wonka wears.

Waxworks creatures from previous story are seen in Webley's room. These include an Uvodni head (seen in The Sarah Jane Adventures story "Warriors of Kudlak"), a Blowfish head - marking its first appearance in Doctor Who proper ("Kiss Kiss, Bang Bang"), a Shansheeth head ("Death of The Doctor"), a Chameleon ("The Faceless Ones"), a dummy ("The God Complex") and several aliens seen in "The Rings of Akhaten", including an Ultramancer, a Pan-Babylonian and a Lugal-Irra-Kush.

Porridge is revealed to be inside the undefeated automated chess player. A very similar chess-playing machine, The Turk, was constructed by the Hungarian inventor Wolfgang von Kempelen in the 18th century and was actually controlled by a man inside. This invention was also referenced in the Big Finish Productions audio story "The Silver Turk" - where the Eighth Doctor encountered a damaged early Cyberman that was being used to play chess.

The Doctor echoes a quote from his former companion Rory Williams when confronted by the troops aiming guns at him: ‘Don't shoot, I'm nice!’ (see "The God Complex").

The Doctor and his cyber-self discuss The Doctor removing himself from databanks across the universe (see: "Asylum of the Daleks", "Dinosaurs on a Spaceship" and "The Angels Take Manhattan").

The Doctor is heard to say ‘You've had some cowboys in here’ (see "The Girl in the Fireplace and "The Eleventh Hour").

The Doctor tells the Cyber-Planner that earlier versions of the Cyber operating systems could be scrambled by gold or cleaning fluid. The Cybermen's weakness to gold was first shown in "Revenge of the Cybermen" and, during "The Moonbase", The Doctor's companions Ben Jackson and Polly Wright mix a cocktail of cleaning solvents (referred to as ‘Cocktail Polly’) that is used to dissolve the Cybermen's chest units.

It has been a long-established fact that gold can incapacitate and even kill Cybermen. As well as the Vogans using this precious metal to defeat the Cybermen, in "Revenge of the Cybermen", The Doctor has exploited this weakness in "Earthshock" and there’s even a strong suggestion in "Battlefield" that UNIT have stocked up on gold-tipped bullets in case they ever encounter the Cybermen.

It is revealed that the Cyber-Wars lasted one thousand years and that the planet Hedgewick's World is on was used to hide 3 million Cybermen and also repair them.

The Cyber-Doctor answers to Clara's question of ‘More Cybermen?’ with ‘They're waking from their tomb right now’ is a possible reference to the television story "The Tomb of the Cybermen".

Subsequently, the Cybermen exiting their tombs mirrors the cliffhanger at the end of episode three of the 1982 Fifth Doctor story "Earthshock", when three rows of Cybermen march towards the camera.

The Cyber-Tombs featured in two previous stories; the 1967 Second Doctor story "The Tomb of the Cybermen" and in the 1984 Sixth Doctor story "Attack of the Cybermen".

The Cyber mind-control on humans was first seen in "The Moonbase", where the scientists operating The Gravitron were remotely controlled by the invading Cybermen using brain implants, in order to disrupt Earth's weather.

The Cybermen's ability to adapt to attacks is reminiscent of the Borg from Star Trek: The Next Generation. Additionally, the Borg used nanotechnology to convert individuals, similar to the Cybermites, and The Doctor's and Webley's cyber-appearance is reminiscent of the Borg's half machine, half human face. Similar to the Borg in Star Trek: First Contact the Cybermen in this story assimilated new members by use of something coming out of their wrists.

The converted Webley tells The Doctor that the Cybermen have turned children into Cyber-Planners in the past because of a child's imagination. This mirrors the reasoning behind the Renegade Daleks' use of a young girl as their Battle Computer in the 1988 Seventh Doctor story "Remembrance of the Daleks".

Whilst not being able to convert non-humans in the past, the Cybermen can now process creatures like Time Lords, at least partially. The Doctor is also heard to state that the Cybermen can't convert non-human beings. However, in his sixth incarnation, he met Cybermen who, whilst in the Land of Fiction after Zoe Heriot piloted them there, converted; Faries, Trolls, Merpeople, Vampires and even a Whale into their Cyber-forces, in the Big Finish Productions audio story "Legend of the Cybermen".

It is never made clear whether these Cybermen are of the Mondasian or Cybus variety, although they use the phrase ‘upgrade’ and one of Webley's Cybermen being similar to the ones from "Closing Time" with his other two having the Cybus logo like the ones in the 2010 story "The Pandorica Opens/The Big Bang". Webley's explanation that the Cybermen have adapted and that the new models will be unstoppable may hint that the two types of Cybermen have encountered each other and merged their technology. This would explain why Cybus-like versions had Mondasian ships in "The Pandorica Opens/The Big Bang" and "A Good Man Goes to War", why two of Webley's models have the Cybus logo and why the Cyber-Wars lasted longer than has been previously stated.

The ‘Cyberiad’ refers to the collective consciousness of the Cybermen.

The Cybermen having died out/been wiped out was also a plot element of "The Moonbase", "The Tomb of the Cybermen" and "Revenge of the Cybermen".

UNIT also designed a device that would blow up a planet to be used if left with no other options, It was called the Osterhagen Project (see "The Stolen Earth/Journey's End").

During the exterior shot of Porridge's ship, writing in Aurebesh is visible on the hull. This is the writing system used in Star Wars by the Galactic Republic and later the Galactic Empire, paralleling the presence of an unidentified human empire in this story.



First and Last

The Firsts:

 The first appearance of Cybermites.

 Angie and Artie Maitland travel in the TARDIS for the first time.

 The first Doctor Who story to be directed by Stephen Wolfenden.


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The Plot

WARNING: May Contain SpoilersHide Text
Nightmare in Silver

Cyber Chess
Cyber Chess

The TARDIS takes The Doctor and Clara Oswald, along with Angie, and Artie - the two children who she looks after, - to Hedgewick's World of Wonders, the biggest and best extraterrestrial theme park. However, they find the park abandoned and closed down, and under military occupation by The Captain and her small platoon of troops.

The Doctor manages to convince The Captain that he is an official looking for their missing Emperor. After The Captain and her troops move off The Doctor and his travelling companions discover Webley, who leads them into the desolate, once grand amusement park, and then into his attraction Webley's World of Wonders. There Webley shows them his waxwork attractions of alien beings including several deactivated Cybermen. It is revealed that the Cybermen race were defeated and exterminated a thousand years ago and are now harmless museum pieces. One of them has even been converted into a chess-playing machine operated by a dwarf called Porridge.

After having fun playing at some of the park's other attractions, Clara is ready to take Angie and Artie back home. However, The Doctor decides to stay after becoming suspicious of some funny insects that are infesting the park. The bugs are revealed to be Cybermites, which reactivates the chess playing Cybermen in the museum which then abducts Webley, Angie, and Artie.

Webley
Webley

The Captain and her platoon are shocked that there are still active Cybermen, and admit that they are a punishment unit that was banished to this planet to keep them out of the way. The Doctor, unable to trust The Captain, puts Clara in charge of the troops, advising her to find somewhere defensible and also warning her not to let anyone destroy the planet while he goes to rescue Angie and Artie. However, as Clara, Porridge, The Captain and her platoon make their way to Natty Longshoe's Comical Castle, to defend themselves from the Cybermen, The Doctor finds that Angie and Artie have been infected with the Cybermites and are now under the Cybermen's control.

A partially converted Webley then reveals to The Doctor that as a battle raged between humanity and the Cybermen, they built a bunker to repair their damaged units - kidnapping people from the amusement park before it closed. They needed children's brains to build a new Cyber-Planner, as a child's brain has infinite potential. However, to further their plans, they need an advanced brain like The Doctor's. The Doctor points out that Cybermen can only use humans, but Cyber-Webley reveals that they have upgraded themselves to the point where they can convert any organic lifeform. He then infects The Doctor with Cybermites.

Porridge
Porridge

Inside The Doctor's head the Cyber-Planner attempts to take control of The Doctor's mind. To prevent this The Doctor threatens to initiate a regeneration, which would destroy the Cyberman implants in his brain and anything connected to them. Realising that they are at a stalemate, the Cyber-Planner agrees to The Doctor's challenge to play a game of chess, with the winner taking control of The Doctor's mind.

Meanwhile, at the castle, Clara takes stock of the platoon's anti-Cybermen weapons. However, they only possess one anti-Cyberman gun, several hand pulsers, and a planet-destroying bomb. Clara takes possession of the bomb trigger and orders The Captain not to use the bomb's verbal command. In a private moment, The Captain reveals both that she knows Porridge and that she was once part of the Imperial Guard. Porridge tells Clara that drastic measures are the only way to fight the Cybermen, and if a Cyberman cannot be immediately destroyed, then the entire planet must be destroyed. The Captain, having been sent to the punishment platoon for disobeying orders, decides to make up for her past failure by activating the bomb, despite Clara and Porridge's protests. However, The Captain is shot and killed by a Cyberman before she can give the detonation command. Clara decides to go on the offensive, and working with the platoon, she manages to destroy the Cyberman attacking them.

In the Cybermen's base, The Doctor manages to temporarily disrupt the Cyber-Planner's control over him, and reunites with Clara, warning her that the Cyber-Planner intends to reactivate the rest of the dormant Cybermen. He then continues the chess game against the Cyber-Planner, knowing that it will not keep its promise if he wins. Posing as The Doctor, the Cyber-Planner then tricks Clara into coming close enough to grab the bomb trigger and destroy it.

Artie and Angie
Artie and Angie

With no more threats to himself, the Cyber-Planner then sends its entire Cyberman army against Clara and the platoon. As the Cybermen gain access to the castle, overwhelming Clara, Porridge and the remaining troops, The Doctor, still playing chess with the Cyber-Planner, agrees to sacrifice his Queen so guaranteeing his loss in return for setting Angie and Artie free. The Doctor then bluffs the Cyber-Planner, saying he has a way to defeat him in three moves. Falling for the bluff, the Cyber-Planner shuts down the Cyberman army so as to use their processing power to figure out The Doctor's strategy. The Doctor then uses the distraction to disable his implants with a powered-up hand pulser, banishing the Cyber-Planner from his mind.

However, the Cybermen begin to reactivate. Angie points out that Porridge is the Emperor, something she has known since she saw his face on an Imperial penny given to her by Webley. Porridge, who never wanted to be Emperor in the first place, reluctantly uses his voice command to activate the bomb, revealing that using this command will immediately summon his flagship which will automatically teleport him and everyone aboard. As the bomb ticks down, The Doctor quickly asks for his TARDIS to be teleported to the Imperial ship. This is done just as the planet is destroyed along with all of the Cybermen.

With the Cyberman defeated Porridge remarks that he liked being normal - not an emperor of a thousand galaxies - and not lonely. Clara replies that he doesn't have to be lonely, and he agrees, proposing to her on the spot. However, Clara turns him down saying she has no wish to be the Queen of the Universe. They then depart in the TARDIS. After returning the children and Clara to their home, The Doctor once again ponders Clara's identity once more.

Meanwhile back on the Imperial ship, after scanning for any remaining Cyberman technology and not finding any, Porridge orders his ship to return home. However, a floating piece of a Cyberman is left blinking in the darkness of space.

 
The Cybermen Awake
The Cybermen Awake
Captain and Clara
Captain and Clara
Doctor Upgrade
Doctor Upgrade
A Game of Chess
A Game of Chess
 
Double Doctors
Double Doctors
The Cybermen Attack
The Cybermen Attack
Back To Normal
Back To Normal
The Mystery Continues
The Mystery Continues




Quote of the Story


 'I am putting Clara in charge. Clara, stay alive till I get back - and don't let anyone blow up this planet!'

The Doctor



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Release Information

FormatTitleRelease Date (UK)Code NumberCover ArtRemarks
Video
DVD
Doctor Who Series 7 Part 2 Box SetMay 2013BBCDVD 3802Photo-montageDVD boxed set containing all 8 stories and the 2012 Christmas Special
Video
Blu-Ray
Doctor Who Series 7 Part 2 Box SetMay 2013BBCBD 0232Photo-montageBlu-Ray boxed set containing all 8 stories and the 2012 Christmas Special
Audio
CD
Original Television Soundtrack - Series 7September 2013Photo-montageMusic by Murray Gold
Video
DVD
The Complete Seventh Series Box SetOctober 2013BBCDVD 3838Photo-montageDVD boxed set containing 15 stories
Video
Blu-Ray
The Complete Seventh Series Box SetOctober 2013BBCBD 0241Photo-montageBlu-Ray boxed set containing 15 stories
Video
DVD
The Complete Seventh Series Box Set (Limited Edition)October 2013BBCDVD 3878Photo-montageLimited Edition DVD boxed set containing 13 stories
Video
Blu-Ray
The Complete Seventh Series Box Set (Limited Edition)October 2013BBCBD 0251Photo-montageLimited Edition Blu-Ray boxed set containing 13 stories
Video
Blu-Ray
The Complete Series 1-7 Box Set (Limited Edition)December 2013BBCBD 0242Photo-montageLimited Edition Blu-Ray boxed set containing all Series 1-7 stories at full 1080p high definition
Video
DVD
The Complete Seventh Series (2014 Re-release)August 2014BBCDVD 3971Photo-montageBoxed set containing all 15 stories


In Print

No Book Release
Doctor Who Magazine - PreviewIssue 460 (Released: June 2013)
Doctor Who Magazine - ReviewIssue 461 (Released: July 2013)

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Original Television Soundtrack Cover

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Complete Series DVD Box Set
Complete Series DVD Box Set

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Complete Series Blu-Ray Box Set
Complete Series Blu-Ray Box Set

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Complete Series Ltd Edition DVD Box Set
Complete Series Ltd Edition DVD Box Set

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Complete Series Ltd Edition Blu-Ray Box Set
Complete Series Ltd Edition Blu-Ray Box Set

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Complete Series 1-7 Ltd Edition Blu-Ray Box Set
Complete Series 1-7 Ltd Edition Blu-Ray Box Set

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VIDEO
Complete Series DVD Box Set<BR>(2014 Re-release)
Complete Series DVD Box Set
(2014 Re-release)

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Doctor Who Magazine - Review: Issue 461
Doctor Who Magazine - Review: Issue 461

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