BBC Doctor Who - The Stories BBC
QuickNav to a Season: 
QuickNav to a Story: 
 
The Previous Story
The Greatest Show in the Galaxy
 The Previous Story
The Previous Story
(Silver Nemesis)
 The Next Story
(Battlefield)
Season
Details
SynopsisGeneral
Information
The
Episodes
Audience
Appreciation
ArchivesNotesFirst and LastThe PlotQuote of
the Story
Release
Information
In PrintPhoto
Gallery
 

Sylvester McCoy
The Greatest Show in the Galaxy
Seventh Doctor Logo


Synopsis


The Doctor Outside the Circus
The Doctor Outside the Circus
 The TARDIS takes The Doctor and Ace to the planet Segonax, the latest home of the famous Psychic Circus. But Ace finds the clowns a bit creepy and would much rather stay out in the sun, which may be just as well...

 This is no ordinary circus and people come from planets far and wide to audition for the opportunity to take part. But there's a darker side to the show - who are the three members of the audience upon whose whims the performers' lives depend? And why is the Chief Clown driving a hearse and trying to capture the local youths?

 The Doctor decides to investigate further and, while Ace tries to befriend some of the more terrified workers, he realises that the Psychic Circus is really a front for a far older, and dealer, menace from his past. He and Ace must ward off killer bus conductors, werewolves, the walking dead, and some murderous robot clowns before the can hope to stop an evil from the vary dawn of history...

Source: BBC VHS Video


General Information

Season: Twenty Five
Production Code: 7J
Story Number: 151
Episode Numbers:678 - 681
Number of Episodes: 4
Percentage of Episodes Held:100%
Production Dates: May - June 1988
Broadcast Started: 14 December 1988
Broadcast Finished: 04 January 1989
Colour Status: Colour
Studio: None
Location: Warmwell Quarry (Warmwell, Dorset) and BBC Elstree Car Park (Hertfordshire).
Writer:Stephen Wyatt
Director:Alan Wareing
Producer:John Nathan-Turner
Script Editor:Andrew Cartmel
Production Assistant:Alexandra Todd
Production Associate:June Collins
Assistant Floor Managers:David Tilley and Duncan McAlpine
Designer:David Laskey
Costume Designer:Rosalind Ebbutt
Make-Up Designer:Denise Baron
Cameramen:Alan Jessop (Outside Broadcast) and Barry Chaston (Outside Broadcast)
Incidental Music:Mark Ayres
Special Sounds (SFX Editor):Dick Mills
Studio Sounds:Scott Talbott
Lighting:Don Babbage and Henry Barber
Visual Effects:Steve Bowman
Title Sequence:Oliver Elmes
Title Music:Ron Grainer and the BBC Radiophonic Workshop. Arranged by Keff McCulloch
Number of Doctors: 1
The Doctor: Sylvester McCoy (The Seventh Doctor)
Number of Companions: 1The Companion: Sophie Aldred (Ace) Additional Cast: T.P. McKenna (Captain Cook), Jessica Martin (Mags), Chris Jury (Deadbeat/Kingpin), Ian Reddington (Chief Clown), Ricco Ross (Ringmaster), Deborah Manship (Morgana), Christopher Guard (Bellboy), Gian Sammarco (Whizzkid), Daniel Peacock (Nord), Dee Sadler (Flowerchild), Peggy Mount (Stallslady), Dean Hollingsworth (Bus Conductor), David Ashford (Dad), Janet Hargreaves (Mum), Kathryn Ludlow (Little Girl)Setting: The Psychic Circus, Segonax Villains:Chief Clown, Gods of Ragnarok and Robot Clowns

The Episodes

No. Episodes Broadcast
(UK)
Duration Viewers
(Millions)
In Archive
678Part 114 December 198824'23"5.0PAL 1" colour videotape
679Part 221 December 198824'20"5.3PAL 1" colour videotape
680Part 328 December 198824'30"4.8PAL 1" colour videotape
681Part 404 January 198924'24"6.6PAL 1" colour videotape

Total Duration 1 Hour 38 Minutes


Audience Appreciation

Average Viewers (Millions) 5.4
Doctor Who Magazine Poll (1998)67.28%  (Position = 84 out of 159)
Doctor Who Magazine Poll (2003)344 Points (Position = 46 out of 159)
Doctor Who Magazine Poll (2009)67.73% Higher (Position = 119 out of 200)
Doctor Who Magazine Poll (2014)71.95% Higher (Position = 108 out of 241)


Archives


 All four episodes exist as PAL 1” colour videotapes. A 71-edit scratch print of episodes 1-3 also exist.



Return to the top of this page
 


Notes


This four-part story was the final story of the Season Twenty Five. It was originally considered to be filmed entirely in the studio but ended up technically being filmed entirely on location - although the main location was in a tent erected in the car park of BBC Elstree studios due to an asbestos scare that struck the BBC's studios.

Stephen Wyatt was asked to compose a new idea shortly after completing work on "Paradise Towers". Because of Stephen Wyatt’s knack for unusual settings, Producer John Nathan-Turner suggested an adventure taking place at a circus.

This story was originally written as for a three-part slot for Season Twenty Five. Subsequently, though, John Nathan-Turner and Script Editor Andrew Cartmel asked Stephen Wyatt to expand his storyline to four episodes, including some location material. This meant there could be more of the planet Segonax, on which the Psychic Circus was located, more characters who could be killed off (such as Nord and Whizz Kid), and expanded roles for Flowerchild and Bellboy whose roles were a reflection of the writer's disenchantment with the hippy movement of the Sixties.

Ben Aaronovitch, another potential Season Twenty Five writer, suggested an explorer character along the lines of Indiana Jones. This inspired the creation of Captain Cook, to whom Stephen Wyatt expanded this role enormously. At one stage, Stephen Wyatt even wanted to have Captain Cook mysteriously survive the destruction of the Psychic Circus.

Stephen Wyatt’s original vision of the Circus - as a competitive arena in which defeated teams were killed off one by one - had been greatly altered.

Whizzkid had originally been intended to be a computer genius who was an expert at all the Circus' games, but the evolving premise had made him essentially redundant. With the encouragement of the production office, however, Stephen Wyatt decided to retain the character, transforming him into a parody of the stereotypical Doctor Who fan.

Other changes to the script included renaming Mags' home planet from MacVulpine to Volpana; setting episode four during daytime instead of at night; removing the dialogue of the robot buried in the desert, who would originally lure passersby into approaching him before threatening to attack them; and making Segonax a desert world instead of a pastoral setting. The Little Girl was also called Sandra at one point.

The cast included Chris Jury, better known for his appearances in Lovejoy; Ian Reddington before his regular starring role as market owner 'Tricky Dicky' in EastEnders; Gian Sammarco fresh from starring as Adrian Mole in The Secret Diaries of Adrian Mole; impressionist Jessica Martin; and popular actors Daniel Peacock, T P McKenna and Peggy Mount.

Dean Hollingsworth, as the Bus Conductor, is credited for being in the third episode even though he does not appear. While Lorna McCulloch, who voices one of the Gods of Ragnarok, is uncredited in the fourth episode.

Jessica Martin, who plays Mags (a werewolf-like alien), briefly returned in the 2007 Tenth Doctor story "Voyage of the Damned" voicing Queen Elizabeth II.

Ian Reddington later played the part of ‘Nobody No-One’ in the Big Finish Productions audio story "A Death in the Family".

The Doctor is seen performing a number of sleight-of-hand conjuring tricks in the fourth episode. He also produces a variety of items as part of his magic show, including a scarf, a length of rope, and an egg. Sylvester McCoy was coached in magic by Geoffrey Durham, otherwise known as the Great Soprendo, for these scenes.

The director assigned to this story was Alan Wareing, whose credits included episodes of EastEnders and Casualty. Alan Wareing had been an assistant Floor Manager on several stories in the early Eighties.

In preparing the robotic clown outfits a cast of the face of Ian Reddington, the actor playing the Chief Clown, was taken. All the robot clown masks were then based around this cast, so that they were all echoes of the Chief Clown. However, each of the masks was different and each was designed by a different make-up assistant, overseen by Make-Up Designer Denise Baron.

Location work took place at West Knighton Pit in Warmwell, Dorset beginning in May 1988. The production was then supposed to return to the studio for two studio blocks. However, asbestos was discovered in Studio TC2 of BBC Television Centre during renovations, and traces of the dangerous material were subsequently detected in other studios. This prompted the BBC to close down all the studios until the problem could be rectified, but this meant the loss of the first block, at least.

With no additional studio time left and the performers' contracts obligating them to the production only until mid-June, for a brief time the story was cancelled. In desperation, John Nathan-Turner and Alan Wareing conceived the idea of erecting an actual tent complex on a field off the A40. Although this was forbidden, because any remount would have to take place on BBC premises, designer David Laskey suggested the same plan could be accomplished at a car park or similar facility. Finally, BBC Elstree - the home of EastEnders amongst other productions - agreed to let The Doctor Who team use their parking lot for two weeks. Although the arrangement was not ideal, as it would mean contending with the sound of pedestrians and airplanes landing at the nearby Elstree Aerodrome, it meant that this story could be completed.

Work at Elstree began in June 1988 and for a time, John Nathan-Turner hoped that this story’s second studio block might proceed as originally scheduled, but eventually this was cancelled as well. Consequently, Alan Wareing was forced to be extremely efficient in arranging his shots.

Despite the hasty change of plans this story experienced few major modifications despite. Amongst these though was the loss of Kathryn Ludlow, who played the Little Girl. By the time the scenes of the Gods in their nonhuman forms came to be recorded, the production team had exhausted the number of days that Kathryn Ludlow, as a child actor, could commit to the story. Consequently, Lorna McCulloch donned the God costume, while Alan Wareing’s own modulated voice provided the requisite dialogue.

Another late change was Bellboy’s appearance after his capture. Originally, he was to be haggard and white-haired, implying that he had suffered electric shock treatment, but this was dropped on recording. The script also indicated that he should be lashed to a kite, not a workbench. Meanwhile, it was thought that the use of a real tent (as opposed to a sturdier studio mock-up) would mean the loss of the sequence, in the fourth episode, where The Doctor swings on ropes. This scene was retained, however, at John Nathan-Turner's insistence and was accomplished without problem.

The Doctor is heard quoting Neil Armstrong (‘One small step for man’) and Al Jolson, via Bachman Turner Overdrive (‘You ain't seen nothin' yet’).

The Doctor knows the Gods of Ragnarok, and says he has fought them ‘all through time’.

Near the beginning of the first episode, Ace is seen briefly wearing the Fourth Doctor's trademark scarf, and Melanie Bush’s polka-dotted top from "Paradise Towers".

Captain Cook, the galactic explorer, spends much time remembering planets he has visited, including Lelex (the natives are Monopods), Dioscuros, Inphitus (where the Galvanic Catastrophods are ‘not what they were’), Leophantos, the baleful plains of Grolon, Fagiros (where the Architrave of Batgeld showed Cook his collection of early Ganglion pottery), the Bay of Paranoia on Golobus and the gold mines of Katakiki and Periboea. He also visited Vulpana, where he met Mags, recommends the frozen pits of Overod, says that Boromeo has ‘bouncing Upas trees’ and Anagonia ‘singing squids’, and shares The Doctor's love of tea from the Groz valley on Melogophon.

Captain Cook serves tea to Mags, The Doctor, and Ace; both at his campsite and at the circus.

Mags is the first werewolf to appear on the show. The Tenth Doctor deals with a similar alien race in the 2006 story "Tooth and Claw". While the Eighth Doctor encountered a strange virus capable of turning humans into werewolves in the BBC Books’ The Eighth Doctor Stories novel "Kursaal". Werewolf clans have appeared several times in the spin-off stories: In the Big Finish Productions audio story "Loups-Garoux" and the BBC Books’ The Past Doctors Stories novel "Wolfsbane".

Various posters state that the Psychic circus has visited Othrys, the Boriatic wastes, Marpesia and the grand pagoda on Cinethon.

Virgin Books’ The New Adventures novel "Conundrum", written by Steve Lyons, states that the Gods of Ragnarok created the Land of Fiction, seen in the 1968 Second Doctor story "The Mind Robber". The New Adventures novel "All-Consuming Fire", written by Andy Lane, identifies the Gods of Ragnarok with the Great Old Ones from H. P. Lovecraft's "Cthulhu Mythos".

This is the first story to feature music composed by Mark Ayres - who suggested a single from this story, 'The Psychic Circus', performed by Christopher Guard and Mark Ayres, but the BBC was not interested despite the interest of the production team.

A rap song is heard during this story. This was the first original song commissioned for the show since "The Ballad of the Last Chance Saloon" in the 1966 First Doctor story "The Gunfighters". The next original song for the show would be "Song for Ten" heard in the 2005 Tenth Doctor story "The Christmas Invasion".

Season Twenty Five was originally supposed to have been broadcast in production order, with this story being the second. However, the expected start of the season on the 7th September 1988 was delayed to the 5th October because of the BBC’s coverage of the Seoul Summer Olympics. John Nathan-Turner still wanted to begin the season with "Remembrance of the Daleks" and have the first episode of the Twenty Fifth anniversary story, "Silver Nemesis", broadcast on the 23rd November - the actual date of the show’s silver jubilee. This left only three weeks in between the two stories. Consequently, the original season finale, "The Happiness Patrol", was exchanged with this story. Unfortunately, this resulted in a couple of unforeseen continuity errors: Flowerchild's earring could be seen on Ace's jacket in the preceding two stories, "Silver Nemesis" and "The Happiness Patrol", though she only acquired it during this story. While during the first episode Ace is seen searching for her rucksack, which she blew up during the events of "Silver Nemesis".

The last episode of this story received the highest viewing figure (6.6 million) for a story during the Seventh Doctor’s era – and this was against Coronation Street.

Because of the discovery of asbestos at the BBC, which led to the temporary closure of various television studios, this story nearly met the same fate as that of the uncompleted Fourth Doctor story "Shada" - that of being cancelled after the location work had been completed.

Although the production office was interested in commissioning a third story from Stephen Wyatt, the writer was growing concerned about being pigeonholed as part of The Doctor Who team and declined the invitation. Stephen Wyatt has since been a mainstay on radio in addition to contributing scripts to the drama series Casualty.

A novelisation of this story, written by Stephen Wyatt, was published by Target Books in December 1989 - the same month the final episode of the original run of the show was broadcast.

Alister Pearson’s cover artwork for the Target novelisation was used again on the sleeve of the 1992 Silva Screen CD release containing the music from this story.

A volume titled "The Greatest Show in the Galaxy: The Discerning Fan's Guide to Doctor Who" was published by McFarland Publishing in July 2007. Despite the similarity between the title of this book, it is a reference work that examines Doctor Who from a number of different perspectives.



First and Last

The Firsts:

 The first Doctor Who story to be directed by Alan Wareing.

 Mark Ayres' first involvement in the show providing the incidental music.

 The first Doctor Who story to contain an original song since "The Ballad of the Last Chance Saloon" that had been used in the 1966 First Doctor story "The Gunfighters".


The Lasts (Subject to Future Stories):

 The last story of Season Twenty Five.

 The last Doctor Who story to be written by Stephen Wyatt.


Return to the top of this page
 


The Plot

WARNING: May Contain SpoilersHide Text
The Doctor Juggling
The Doctor Juggling

Inside the TARDIS, The Doctor is juggling when an advertising beacon materialises in the Console Room, promoting the Psychic Circus on the planet Segonax. This prompts The Doctor to enter the circus’s talent contest.

On Segonax, two young people, Bellboy and Flowerchild, are running across an open area of ground. They are being tracked by kites controlled by the Chief Clown from a hearse. Bellboy draws the kites’ attention away as Flowerchild finds an abandoned bus and, on entering it, she locates a hidden box. However, before she can open it she is attacked and killed by a robot bus conductor. Bellboy, meanwhile, is captured by the Chief Clown and is returned to the circus.

Shortly afterwards The Doctor and his travelling companion, Ace, arrive on Segonax and obtain directions to the circus from a local stallslady. The Doctor tries to hitch a lift on a bike owned by Nord the Vandal, but Nord refuses and heads off to the circus on his own. The two travellers have no choice but to follow on foot. On the way they meet up with the intergalactic explorer Captain Cook and his companion, a young woman called Mags. Captain Cook is taking tea while Mags investigates a giant robot mostly buried in the sand when suddenly the robot comes to life and grabs Mags. Ace though is able to deactivate the robot by hitting it over the head with a shovel.

The Doctor and Ace
The Doctor and Ace

The Doctor and Ace then accompany Captain Cook and Mags and they soon come to the bus. On entering it they too are attacked by the robot bus conductor, but The Doctor manages to get it to destroy itself. When looking around Ace finds one of Flowerchild’s earrings in the sand outside and pins it to her jacket. The Doctor and Ace then find themselves having to make their own way to the circus when Captain Cook and Mags take off in their jeep. When The Doctor and Ace eventually arrive at the circus Ace hesitates outside as she thought that she heard screaming. The Chief Clown then appears at the entrance and waves them in. Inside the Ringmaster invites the two travellers to take their seats. They also meet Morgana, a gypsy mystic who tries to warn them of something but the Chief Clown appears and ushers them through.

The Doctor and Ace find themselves sitting next to a strange family consisting of a mother, a father and a little girl. The show then starts with some juggling and tumbling clowns. Then suddenly the Ringmaster announces that The Doctor will be the next act. When The Doctor leaves to prepare Ace runs off when the Chief Clown notices Flowerchild’s earring on her jacket. The Doctor is put in a cage with Captain Cook, Mags and Nord. Captain Cook insists that Nord be the next to enter the ring, and so is taken away by the clowns.

The Bus Conductor
The Bus Conductor

While hiding at the entrance to the circus, Ace overhears Morgana and the Ringmaster talking. Morgana it seems is very unhappy. The Chief Clown then arrives and Ace’s presence is revealed. While being chased by the clowns Ace discovers Bellboy. She is forced to hide when the Chief Clown arrives and she overhears him instructing Bellboy to repair the bus conductor robot.

Back in the ring Nord has to entertain the family. At first all seems to go well but when he is asked to tell a joke the family do not find him funny which results in him being reduced to ashes by a bolt of lightning. A big fan both of the circus, and of Captain Cook, then arrives at the circus. At the same time The Doctor and Mags manage to escape from their cell while Ace is captured by the Chief Clown and put in a darkened workshop full of partially constructed robots, which start to move. She is rescued by Bellboy, who switches off the robots. The Doctor and Mags meanwhile find their way to a stone tunnel leading to what appears to be a bottomless well. However, when The Doctor drops a juggling club down the well an eye symbol, of a design previously seen displayed on the kites, appears at the bottom. Suddenly Captain Cook appears, flanked by clowns. He has come to collect them all as they are due to appear in the ring. As they leave they pass under an image of a moon, which induces a strange reaction in Mags. The Doctor takes this opportunity to escape again. He returns to the circus entrance where he sees, in Morgana’s crystal ball, an image of the same eye symbol.

The Doctor then meets Deadbeat, a mentally damaged man, who takes them to Ace and Bellboy. Bellboy remembers that Deadbeat used to be called Kingpin and both men haltingly recall events that brought the Psychic Circus to its present situation. This allows The Doctor to start to piece the mystery together. The Doctor, Ace and Deadbeat head off to the well. There Deadbeat shows The Doctor and Ace how he summoned the powers that now control the circus by lifting an amulet above the well. They realise that the centre of the amulet – the eye – is now missing and must be hidden at the bus. While Ace goes to the bus to fetch it, The Doctor returns to the cage and proposes to Cook and Mags that they all enter the ring together. But Captain Cook arranges for the young fan to go before him into the ring, who is then killed. The Ringmaster then introduces The Doctor, Captain Cook and Mags to the ring. Captain Cook asks to have a moon spotlight directed at Mags. This causes her to turn into a werewolf and she chases The Doctor around the ring. The Doctor confronts the family, all of whose eyes glow green. He then falls back into the ring but instead of being attacked by Mags she turns on Captain Cook and kills him.

Mags and Captain Cook
Mags and Captain Cook

Back at the bus Ace locates the box and takes it outside to Deadbeat, but they are unable to open it. Distracted by trying to open the box they are unaware of the bus conductor robot, which has been repaired and has been returned to the bus. The bus conductor attacks them and in the struggle the box is inadvertently stamped on which causes it to open. While Ace continues to struggle, with the bus conductor, Deadbeat retrieves the centre of his amulet from within the box and inserts it in place. His full mental faculties return and he tells Ace to hit a button on the top of the bus conductor’s head. She does so and the robot explodes. Deadbeat - now Kingpin once more - realises he must get the amulet to The Doctor.

In the circus ring when the moon light is no longer shining on Mags she reverts back to her human state allowing her and The Doctor to run from the ring. The family demand another act and, as there is no-one left they kill the Ringmaster and Morgana instead. Outside The Doctor tells Mags to meet up with Ace and Kingpin. As she leaves, however, she is followed by the Chief Clown in the hearse. The hearse’s progress though is obstructed by the stallslady, whose stall is blocking the road. The Chief Clown and the robot clowns continue their pursuit on foot. Mags meets up with Ace and Kingpin. Ace leads them to the buried robot and, using a control unit, given to her earlier by Bellboy, she destroys the robot clowns. The Chief Clown is also killed.

The Doctor meanwhile has asked the eye in the crystal ball to open a pathway for him and has emerged into a different circus ring before three stone gods. He is in the space-time of the Gods of Ragnarok - beings he has fought through all of time. There The Doctor is forced to perform a succession of conjuring tricks to keep the Gods amused. While back at the circus, when they arrive there in the hearse, Ace, Mags and Kingpin find that the circus ring is deserted. Kingpin suddenly realises where The Doctor is and, along with Ace and Mages, they arrive at the top of the well. But behind them Captain Cook comes back to life and he follows them and takes the amulet from Kingpin. The Doctor finishes his act just as Ace makes Captain Cook drop the amulet down the well. The amulet appears before The Doctor and he uses it to deflect blasts of power from the Gods. This causes the dark circus to tremble and fall apart. The Doctor then throws the amulet at the Gods and walks from the circus tent as it is completely destroyed behind him.

With the Gods of Ragnarok defeated The Doctor suggests that Mags help Kingpin to rebuild the circus. Kingpin invites The Doctor and Ace to join them as well, but The Doctor declines - commenting that he finds circuses a little sinister.

 
The Ringmaster and the Chief Clown
The Ringmaster and the Chief Clown
The Chief Clown
The Chief Clown
Mags and The Doctor
Mags and The Doctor
The Gods of Ragnarok
The Gods of Ragnarok
 
Ace Feels Threatened by the Clowns
Ace Feels Threatened by the Clowns
Whizz Kid
Whizz Kid
Bellboy and Flower Child
Bellboy and Flower Child
The Circus is Destroyed
The Circus is Destroyed




Quote of the Story


 'Personally, I just keep on wandering.'

The Doctor



Return to the top of this page
 


Release Information

FormatTitleRelease Date (UK)Code NumberCover ArtRemarks
Audio
CD
The Greatest Show in the Galaxy1992FLMCD 114Photo-montageMusic score
Audio
CD
30 Years at the Radiophonic Workshop1993BBC CD 871Photo-montageSound effects
Audio
CD
The Worlds of Doctor Who1994FLMCD 715Photo-montageMusic score
Video
VHS
The Greatest Show in the GalaxyJanuary 2000BBCV 6798Photo-montage
Video
DVD
The Greatest Show in the GalaxyJuly 2012BBCDVD 3481Photo-montage
Audio
CD
The 50th Anniversary CollectionDecember 2013Photo-montageOriginal Television Soundtracks


In Print

FormatTitleRelease Date (UK)PublisherAuthorCover ArtRemarks
Novel
Novel
The Greatest Show in the GalaxyDecember 1989Target No. 144Stephen WyattAlister PearsonISBN: 0-426-20341-0
Novel
Novel
The Greatest Show in the GalaxyDecember 1991Target No. 144Stephen WyattAlister PearsonVirgin new cover reprint.
ISBN: 0-426-20341-0
CD
CD
The Greatest Show in the GalaxyAugust 2013Target No. 144Stephen WyattAlister PearsonAudio version of the Target Novel read by Sophie Aldred (Ace).
Doctor Who CMS Magazine (In Vision)Issue 99 (Released: November 2001)
Doctor Who Magazine - PreviewIssue 141 (Released: October 1988)
Doctor Who Magazine - After ImageIssue 147 (Released: April 1989)
Doctor Who Magazine - ArchiveIssue 211 (Released: April 1994)
Doctor Who Magazine - Time TeamIssue 409 (Released: June 2009)
Doctor Who Magazine - The Fact of FictionIssue 482 (Released: February 2015)
Doctor Who DVD FilesVolume 113 (Released: May 2013)

Return to the top of this page
 


Photo Gallery


The Doctor and Companion

 
Sylvester McCoy
The Seventh Doctor

   

 
Sophie Aldred
Ace
 
   




On Release

The Greatest Show in the Galaxy CD Cover
The Greatest Show in the Galaxy CD Cover

Silva Screen
AUDIO
Sound Effects CD Cover
Sound Effects CD Cover

BBC
AUDIO
Worlds of Doctor Who CD Cover
Worlds of Doctor Who CD Cover

Silva Screen
AUDIO
   
VHS Video Cover
VHS Video Cover

BBC
VIDEO
DVD Cover
DVD Cover

BBC
VIDEO
The 50th Anniversary Collection Cover
The 50th Anniversary Collection Cover

BBC
AUDIO
   


In Print

Target Book Cover
Target Book Cover

Target
NOVEL
Reprinted Virgin Book Cover
Reprinted Virgin Book Cover

Virgin
NOVEL
Target Audio CD Cover
Target Audio CD Cover

BBC
CD
   


Magazines

Doctor Who CMS Magazine (In Vision): Issue 99
Doctor Who CMS Magazine (In Vision): Issue 99

CMS
Doctor Who Magazine - Preview: Issue 141
Doctor Who Magazine - Preview: Issue 141

Marvel Comics
Doctor Who Magazine - After Image: Issue 147
Doctor Who Magazine - After Image: Issue 147

Marvel Comics
Doctor Who Magazine - Archive: Issue 211
Doctor Who Magazine - Archive: Issue 211

Marvel Comics
   
Doctor Who Magazine - Time Team: Issue 409
Doctor Who Magazine - Time Team: Issue 409

Marvel Comics
Doctor Who Magazine - The Fact of Fiction: Issue 482
Doctor Who Magazine - The Fact of Fiction: Issue 482

Marvel Comics
Doctor Who DVD Files: Volume 113
Doctor Who DVD Files: Volume 113

GE Fabbri


Return to the top of this page
 
 
Who's Who
KJ Software
Who Me
Episodes of the
Seventh Doctor


Season 25 Press to go back to the previous visited page References
 
 
Doctor Who is the copyright of the British Broadcasting Corporation. No infringements intended. This site is not endorsed by the BBC or any representatives thereof.