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Colin Baker
Terror of the Vervoids
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Synopsis


A Vervoid
A Vervoid
 The Time Lords have brought The Doctor to trial, accusing him of gross interference in the affairs of other planets. If he is found guilty he must forfeit all his remaining regenerations.

 In his defence The Doctor tells of an adventure set on board the Hyperion III space liner in his future. Answering a distress call, The Doctor and Mel arrive on the liner just as a series of grisly murders begins.

 Who is behind the murders? Do the enigmatic Mogarians have anything to do with them? Who sent the distress call to the TARDIS? And what hideous menace lies waiting in the Hydroponic Centre?



General Information

Season: Twenty Three
Production Code: 7C-1
Story Number: 143c
Episode Numbers:648 - 651
Number of Episodes: 4
Percentage of Episodes Held:100%
Working Titles:"The Ultimate Foe" and "The Vervoids"
Production Dates: July - August 1986
Broadcast Started: 01 November 1986
Broadcast Finished: 22 November 1986
Colour Status: Colour
Studio: BBC Television Centre (TC1 and TC3)
Location: None
Writer:Pip and Jane Baker
Director:Chris Clough
Producer:John Nathan-Turner
Script Editor:John Nathan-Turner (Uncredited)
Production Assistant:Jane Wellesley
Production Associates:Jenny Doe and June Collins
Assistant Floor Manager:Karen Little
Designer:Dinah Walker
Costume Designer:Andrew Rose
Make-Up Designer:Shaunna Harrison
Incidental Music:Malcolm Clarke
Special Sounds (SFX Editor):Dick Mills
Studio Sounds:Brian Clark
Lighting:Don Babbage
Visual Effects:Kevin Molloy
Title Sequence:Sid Sutton and Terry Handley
Title Music:Ron Grainer and the BBC Radiophonic Workshop. Arranged by Dominic Glynn
Number of Doctors: 1
The Doctor: Colin Baker (The Sixth Doctor)
Number of Companions: 1The Companion: Bonnie Langford (Melanie Bush) (Joins) Guest Cast: Lynda Bellingham (The Inquisitor), Michael Jayston (The Valeyard), Honor Blackman (Professor Lasky) Additional Cast: Michael Craig (Commodore), Denys Hawthorne (Rudge), Yolande Palfrey (Janet), Malcolm Tierney (Doland), David Allister (Bruchner), Tony Scoggo (Grenville/Enzu), Arthur Hewlett (Kimber), Simon Slater (Edwardes), Sam Howard (Atza), Leon Davis (Ortezo), Hugh Beverton (Guard/First Guard), Mike Mungarvan (Duty Officer), Martin Weedon (Second Guard), Barbara Ward (Mutant/Ruth Baxter), Peppi Borza (First Vervoid), Bob Appleby (Second Vervoid)Setting: Trial Sequences: Time Lord Space Station (Rassilon Era)
Evidence Sequences: Hyperion III, intergalactic liner (2986) Villains:Mogarians, Rudge, The Valeyard and Vervoids

The Episodes

No. Episodes Broadcast
(UK)
Duration Viewers
(Millions)
In Archive
648Part 901 November 198624'56"5.2PAL 1" colour videotape
649Part 1008 November 198624'18"4.6PAL 1" colour videotape
650Part 1115 November 198624'07"5.3PAL 1" colour videotape
651Part 1222 November 198624'45"5.2PAL 1" colour videotape

Total Duration 1 Hour 38 Minutes


Audience Appreciation

Average Viewers (Millions) 5.1
Doctor Who Magazine Poll (1998)63.36%  (Position = 106 out of 159)
Doctor Who Magazine Poll (2003)320 Points (Position = 47 out of 159)
Doctor Who Magazine Poll (2009)61.37% Lower (Position = 142 out of 200)
Doctor Who Magazine Poll (2014)64.67% Higher (Position = 168 out of 241)


Archives


 All four episodes exist as PAL 1" colour videotapes. A 71-edit scratch print of all episodes also exists as well as a 72-edit of Part 9.



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Notes


"Terror of the Vervoids" is the title that has been given to the parts nine to twelve of The Trial of a Time Lord, the season-long storyline that constituted Season Twenty Three.

The majority of fans consider this as the most successful part of The Trial of a Time Lord season and features the disjointed first appearance of new companion - the much-maligned Bonnie Langford as Melanie Bush.

The title "Terror of the Vervoids" is not used on screen as the four episodes, that comprise this story, were transmitted as Parts Nine to Twelve of The Trial of a Time Lord.

As no individual title was used onscreen, or on the final scripts for this story, there has been some confusion over how to refer to this story. It was initially commissioned with the title "The Ultimate Foe". However, this title was later given to the Target novelisation of the final two episodes of the fourteen-part The Trial of a Time Lord season. Writers Pip and Jane Baker have repeatedly referred to this story as "The Vervoids" in subsequent interviews, as have other production team members, but this title does not appear to exist on any contemporary documentation. The title "Terror of the Vervoids" was first used when Target Books published the novelisation of this story in February 1988. This unofficial moniker, which was created after the production, is now generally used to refer to this story.

The original plan was for the final six episodes of The Trial of a Time Lord to have three two-part adventures. The first two of these would be closely linked, using largely the same sets. This is a strategy that was used back in Season Twelve with "The Ark in Space" and "Revenge of the Cybermen". Both of the interlinked stories would be made under the same production code, as ‘Serial 7C’, while the final story, forming the trial’s conclusion, would have the production code ‘Serial 7D’ - this though was later changed so that all six episodes came under same ‘7C’ banner.

It was initially planed that as well as writing "The Mysterious Planet" - the first segment of The Trial of a Time Lord - that veteran writer Robert Holmes would also write the final six episodes of the season. Robert Holmes, though was not happy about having to write a six part storyline and so requested that his involvement be limited to just the final two episodes of the season. Therefore Jack Trevor Story and David Halliwell were approached about writing the two future-set two-part stories. Unfortunately, problems with Jack Trevor Story’s contribution quickly became evident, as Eric Saward became aware that the author had little idea of how to write for Doctor Who and so his storyline has to be abandoned.

David Halliwell, meanwhile, had created a storyline entitled "Attack From the Mind" which was set on the planet Penelope, where the beautiful but weak natives were suffering attacks from the rat-like Freds (later renamed Trikes). It transpires that the Penelopeans are intentionally driving the Freds insane using mental hallucinations and feeding off their madness; in the end, the two races destroy each other, providing new fodder for The Valeyard to use against The Doctor. Despite further work on this story Eric Saward felt it was not suitable and it to was rejected.

With time beginning to grow short, John Nathan-Turner and Eric Saward decided that the idea of two interlocking stories should be abandoned in favour of a more straightforward four-part story. They also concurred that only writers familiar with the show should be pursued, in order to save time. To this end, Eric Saward contacted former script editor Christopher H Bidmead, who had last written the 1984 Fifth Doctor story "Frontios" and whose "In the Hollows of Time" had been a strong contender for the original Season Twenty Three. Christopher H Bidmead was therefore commissioned to produce an outline and draft script for "The Last Adventure". This storyline, which had been given a new title of "Pinacotheca", was also abandon as Eric Saward felt it lacked sufficient substance.

It was then suggested to Eric Saward, by Ian Levine - who had acted as the programme’s unofficial fan adviser throughout the Eighties - that he should consider allowing PJ Hammond, who had created the science-fiction series Sapphire and Steel a decade earlier, to write a story. This Eric Saward did and so PJ Hammond was commissioned to write a draft script entitled "End of Term", which was shortly thereafter renamed "Paradise Five". This adventure concerned The Doctor and Melanie Bush investigating a holiday planet which actually served as a front for unscrupulous businessmen, their work being hampered by the appearance of ghost-like creatures called Angels. This time it was John Nathan-Turner who was unhappy with the idea, and "Paradise Five" was also rejected. PJ Hammond later wrote two stories of the spin-off series Torchwood.

Finally, at John Nathan-Turner’s instigation, Eric Saward turned to husband-and-wife team Pip and Jane Baker, who had written last season’s "The Mark of The Rani". Eric Saward was not particularly keen on working with Pip and Jane Baker again, but knew that they could produce scripts quickly and so the writing duo were asked to produce a studio-bound story, even suggesting a mystery-in-space scenario. A late as March 1986, Pip and Jane Baker were commissioned to write "The Ultimate Foe" which later was re-titled to "The Vervoids" before becoming "Terror of the Vervoids". They did this despite the fact that they had been given very little information about the trial itself from which to work.

The Doctor’s new companion, Melanie ‘Mel’ Bush, was created by John Nathan-Turner. Eric Saward though was not happy with Mel, and this was one of a series of disagreements between Producer and Script Editor which was beginning to take its toll on their working relationship.

Bonnie Langford, who John Nathan-Turner originally had in mind to play the part of Melanie Bush, was a well-known star since childhood. Bonnie Langford is best known for the role of the shrill Violet Elizabeth Bott in adaptations of the Just William series of children’s novels, and for appearances in numerous stage musicals. As disappointed as he had been in the character of Melanie Bush, It has been reported that Eric Saward was even more aghast at John Nathan-Turner’s choice of actress to play this part.

Honor Blackman (who played the part of Professor Lasky) is best known for playing Cathy Gale in The Avengers and as Pussy Galore in the James Bond film "Goldfinger". Honor Blackman later played the part of Anahita in the Fifth Doctor audio story "The Children of Seth" - in Big Finish Productions The Lost Stories range.

Eric Saward is not credited as being the Script Editor for this story as he had indicated that he was not interested in script-editing Pip and Jane Baker’s story. Therefore John Nathan-Turner assumed Eric Saward’s responsibilities in this regard and so the completed episodes did not include a Script Editor credit. Shortly afterwards Eric Saward resigned from this position.

The director assigned to the final six episodes of The Trial of a Time Lord was Chris Clough, whose previous television work included episodes of the soap operas Brookside and EastEnders. Because all six episodes were treated as a single production, the location material for "The Ultimate Foe" was taped first. Then the two stories shared a two-day studio block before separate studio blocks were used. "The Ultimate Foe" was completed first before two three-day studio sessions were devoted entirely to "Terror of the Vervoids".

Using an idea taken from the Charles Dickens novel A Christmas Carol, each story that makes up The Trial of a Time Lord season included evidence taken from The Doctor’s past, present and future. Being the third story of the season Pip and Jane Baker were asked to write this segment, set in the ‘future’. Like the other evidence it is extracted from the Matrix. Being events from The Doctor’s future confirms that the Matrix also contains future knowledge, although The Doctor’s failure to use his continued future existence as a defence indicates that the future can be changed, which is why the Matrix is called predictive in "The Deadly Assassin". The Valeyard continues to edit the material, leading to such bizarre comments as The Doctor saying ‘The weird atmosphere down there could lead to phantasmagoria’.

This story was designed as a typical Agatha Christie murder mystery but set on a space liner. The actual structure of this story (and its bubbly tone) is reminiscent of the show during Douglas Adams’ tenure as Script Editor, during Season Seventeen. At the beginning of this story Professor Lasky is briefly seen reading a copy of Agatha Christie’s "Murder on the Orient Express".

Unlike the previous two stories, the events of this story have no underlying connection to The Doctor’s trial, though the trial is used as a framing device.

New companion Melanie Bush is introduced without the typical ‘meeting’ story and no explanation of how she came to be travelling with The Doctor, as the trial evidence takes place in The Doctor’s future - after he had already met her. This is the only time, except for original companion Susan, where the introduction of a companion is done off-screen.

Melanie Bush meets The Doctor for the ‘first time’ in the BBC Books’ The Past Doctors Stories novel "Business Unusual" that was written by Gary Russell.

Mel’s full name ‘Melanie Bush’ is never actually revealed on screen.

It is revealed that Melanie Bush comes from Pease Pottage, and has almost total recall. During this story there are generalised references to other adventures with Melanie Bush.

It is revealed that the character of Commodore Travers is familiar with The Doctor and it seems that The Doctor met Commodore (then Captain) 'Tonker' Travers, and the Captain nearly lost his spaceship, caught up in ‘a web of mayhem and intrigue’ with fatalities. The Doctor has never been shown to meet Commodore Travers on screen before this or in any subsequently published material. Although the BBC Books’ The Past Doctors Stories novel "Instruments of Darkness", written by Gary Russell, states that the original meeting occurred while The Doctor was travelling with Evelyn Smythe.

Hallett has also met The Doctor on a previous occasion and The Doctor admired him. He has also been to the planet Mogar.

Mogar is a planet in the Perseus Arm of the Milky Way. It is rich in rare metals (including vionesium, similar to magnesium, which emits light and carbon dioxide when exposed to air and thus ignited), which are being exploitatively mined by humans, and home to the Mogarians. Between Mogar and Earth lies the Black Hole of Tartarus. Mogarians are gold skinned humanoids with grill like mouths who cannot breathe oxygen. They are a peace loving race, for whom water on the face is fatal, but who nevertheless drink tea.

Vervoids can produce a gas that smells like methane, but is non-explosive, in big enough quantities to kill humans. They appear to learn very quickly. A tiny piece of Vervoid pollen in a cut can transform a human into a semi-Vervoid. The Vervoids were created on Mogar by Professor Lasky to be a workforce to replace robots and a consortium has been established to exploit them. High frequency light causes them to emerge from their pods, and strong light can accelerate their life cycle and ultimately kill them.

It has been reported that John Nathan-Turner was displeased with the appearance of the Vervoids, likening them to Labia.

In contrast to the events presented on Ravalox and Thoros Beta in the previous two stories, the events presented here form part of The Doctor’s defence case, rather than The Valeyard’s prosecution and are selected by him from the future of his personal timeline to defend the case for his continued existence. Why he chooses this particular incident to support that view is unclear, particularly as it features his self-confessed genocide.

It is similarly unclear why The Doctor allows the Hyperion III to remain on course for Earth and destroy the Vervoids, rather than evacuating the survivors in the TARDIS and re-routing the space liner to a planet with no humanoid life.

Article Seven of Gallifreyan law deals with genocide. The Doctor faced a similar choice on whether it was justified to wipe out a whole species in the 1975 Fourth Doctor story "Genesis of the Daleks".

This story contains the last time that Colin Baker, as the Sixth Doctor, would be seen in the TARDIS Console Room - as Sylvester McCoy would play the Sixth Doctor, in the brief scene when the Sixth Doctor regenerates into the Seventh Doctor at the beginning of Season Twenty Four.

The Doctor’s coat contains conjuror’s flowers and he carries an electronic lock pick.

This story contains a number of errors. Namely: Professor Lasky has been into ‘Room 6’, not finding her luggage there, because her key is actually for ‘Room 9’. So how did she get in? The Vervoids wear tracksuits and trainers (as seen when they are wilting and climbing through the tunnel in Part Twelve); If the Vervoids are genetically engineered, why create them with lethal stings? The Mogarians don’t seem to notice a major change in character in one of their number; Why does the Commodore state that the space liner is hi-jack proof, even though it has been hi-jacked by Brookner?

This story marked the last time the BBC Radiophonic Workshop provided a music score for the show. Elizabeth Parker was initially assigned the story, but some schedule shifts meant it ended up being done by Malcolm Clarke instead. Coincidentally, Malcolm Clarke had done the Radiophonic Workshop’s first Doctor Who score, for the 1972 Third Doctor story "The Sea Devils".



First and Last

The Firsts:

 Bonnie Langford's first story as Melanie Bush.

 The first and only time, except for original companion Susan, where the introduction of a companion is done off-screen.

 The first Doctor Who story to be directed by Chris Clough.


The Lasts (Subject to Future Stories):

 The last time that the Sixth Doctor would be seen in the TARDIS console room.

 The last time the BBC Radiophonic Workshop provided the music score for the show.


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The Plot

WARNING: May Contain SpoilersHide Text
The Doctor Keeping Fit
The Doctor Keeping Fit

In the courtroom, aboard the Time Lord’s space station, The Doctor’s trial continues. After a short recess to allow a distraught Doctor to come to terms with the recent news of Peri’s death (see "Mindwarp"), The Valeyard rests his case for the prosecution. It is now The Doctor’s turn to present a case for the defence. He chooses an incident from his own future in the hope that by showing the court an adventure from his own future that he can demonstrate that he has mended his ways. The video screen therefore shows The Doctor, now travelling with a young girl named Melanie Bush - a keep-fit fanatic who has him exercising and drinking carrot juice - and their latest adventure begins when the TARDIS picks up a distress call from someone aboard the intergalactic liner Hyperion III.

This space liner ferries between Mogar and Earth in the year 2986, and amongst its present cargo are precious metals from Mogar and a mysterious caged, light-shielded hydroponic section containing several giant vegetable pods. Aboard is a passenger called Grenville who is recognised by one of his fellow travellers, Kimber, as being a man named Hallet. Grenville though dismisses this as a case of mistaken identity, but his actions are suspicious and he later disguises himself as a crew member in order to gain access to the cargo hold.

Arriving on the Hyperion III, The Doctor and Melanie Bush are arrested as intruders. But when they meet Commodore Travers - the officer in charge of the space liner - it is revealed that he is an old acquaintance of The Doctor’s. Commodore Travers though is sceptical of The Doctor’s explanation for his arrival and claims to know nothing of any distress call being sent from the Hyperion III. However, he tells the space liner’s security officer, Rudge, to allow the two travellers the freedom of the passenger quarters so if The Doctor is up to no good, he will soon incriminate himself.

Professor Sarah Lasky
Professor Sarah Lasky

The Doctor and Melanie Bush therefore join the rest of the passengers, who include a group of botanists led by Professor Sarah Lasky. It is they who are responsible for the hydroponic section in the cargo hold, and also for a guarded isolation room which is off-limits to everyone else. It is not long before it is realised that Grenville has disappeared and when The Doctor and Melanie Bush investigate one of his shoes is found by the space liner’s incinerator. The implication is that he has been murdered. The Doctor then suggests that Melanie Bush should investigate the hydroponic section on her own.

In the courtroom the video footage suddenly stops and The Doctor again tells the court that the Matrix is wrong, asserting that this section of evidence was different when he reviewed it earlier. He has a strong feeling that he is being manipulated and that the evidence is being tampered with. Unable to prove this the video footage continues with Melanie Bush being shown around the cargo hold by the space liner’s communications officer, Edwardes. But, to her horror, he is electrocuted when he touches a metal grille surrounding the hydroponic section. The electrical discharge also causes the creatures within the pods to start moving and ultimately to break out. A guard who arrives to investigate Edwardes’ death, having been alerted by Melanie Bush, is also killed by the creatures.

Commodore Travers
Commodore Travers

Also aboard the Hyperion III are three Mogarians, natives of Mogar who have to wear special breathing apparatus to survive in the same atmosphere as humans as oxygen is poisonous to them. They berate Commodore Travers for steering the space liner too close to a black hole, and also complain about Earth’s mining of Mogar for metal. One of the Mogarians later turns out to be Grenville/Hallet in disguise. He is an undercover agent, an old friend of The Doctor’s, and was responsible for sending the distress signal to the TARDIS. However, before he can reveal his reasons for doing so he is poisoned. Meanwhile in the hydroponic section Professor Lasky, and her assistants, try to cover up the fact that the pods in their charge are now empty. The Doctor and Melanie Bush, however, are highly suspicious of Professor Lasky and trick their way into the guarded isolation room. There they find Ruth Baxter, another of the Professor’s assistants, who is slowly turning into a mutant form of plant life.

Melanie Bush manages to record on tape some alien voices which she has overheard plotting the destruction of all animal-kind. The tape though is subsequently stolen, however, and she suspects that the culprit could have been the space liner’s stewardess, Janet. Therefore at The Doctor’s suggestion, she goes to search Janet’s cabin. The Doctor then makes for the liner’s communications room where he smashes the equipment with an axe. However, back in the courtroom the video footage again suddenly stops with The Doctor protesting once again that this is not what really happened.

Back aboard the Hyperion III, while Melanie Bush is in Janet’s room, it is entered and wrecked by one of the alien plant-creatures, or Vervoids. At the same time Bruchner, another member of Professor Lasky’s team, is plotting to destroy them, having realised the threat that they pose to the human race. The Vervoids on realising this are determined that he should be the next to die. After burning the team’s notes, Bruchner obtains a gun and heads for the flight deck. He manages to set the space liner on a suicide course for the Black Hole of Tartarus before succumbing to a cloud of poisonous marsh gas emitted by a Vervoid in the air conditioning duct. The presence of the gas prevents the space liner’s human crew from entering the flight deck to alter course, but Rudge summons the two Mogarians, Atza and Ortezo, who can do so without suffering any ill effects.

Rudge
Rudge

However, it transpires that Rudge and the Mogarians have been planning all along to hijack the space liner and now that they have seized control of it, they refuse to hand it back to Commodore Travers. The Mogarians are angry about the human exploitation of their home planet, while Rudge is in it simply for the money - this being his last tour of duty. The Mogarians’ plan goes awry, however, when an unseen figure enters the flight deck and throws acid on their face masks, allowing the space liner’s air to penetrate and suffocate them. With his allies dead, Rudge is easily overpowered.

The Vervoids then begin a reign of terror on the space liner, systematically wiping out the human crew and passengers. Another of Professor Lasky’s assistants, Doland, is also revealed to be behind the murder of Hallet and the Mogarians. He plans to bring the Vervoids to Earth, for use as cheap slave labour. However, he too is killed by the creatures. The Doctor realises that the space liner’s occupants are in a terminal situation: it is a case of kill or be killed. When Commodore Travers also realises this he asks The Doctor for his help - so allowing The Doctor in the courtroom to point out that this proves his assistance was requested. He was not interfering.

Back aboard the Hyperion III The Doctor realises that rather than try to kill the Vervoids, it would be better to encourage them to grow. In the cargo hold is a metal called Vionesium, which has properties similar to those of magnesium and emits a bright light when exposed to air. The Doctor instructs Commodore Travers to switch off all the lights on the space liner. This causes the Vervoids to return to their lair, where The Doctor and Melanie Bush use Vionesium bombs to expose them to intense light. This causes the creatures’ growth to accelerate out of control and they all turn brown and crumble to dust as all their energy reserves are used up.

In the Time Lord courtroom, when questioned, The Doctor is forced to admit that his actions on board the Hyperion III resulted in the deaths of all the Vervoids. He however, justifies this by arguing that if even one leaf had survived, and reached Earth, then it would have meant the end of the whole human race. Seizing on this, The Valeyard accuses The Doctor of destroying an entire species and asserts that the charge against him must again change. The Inquisitor agrees that Article 7 of Gallifreyan Law can be invoked. A shocked Doctor now stands accused of genocide…

 
The Mogarians
The Mogarians
The Doctor and Mel
The Doctor and Mel
Ruth Baxter (Half-Vervoid)
Ruth Baxter (Half-Vervoid)
A Vervoid Kills Kimber
A Vervoid Kills Kimber
 
The Vervoids
The Vervoids
A Vervoid
A Vervoid
The Inquisitor
The Inquisitor
The Valeyard
The Valeyard




Quote of the Story


 'This is a situation that requires tact and finesse. Fortunately, I am blessed with both.'

The Doctor



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Release Information

FormatTitleRelease Date (UK)Code NumberCover ArtRemarks
Audio
CD
30 Years at the Radiophonic Workshop1993BBC CD 871Photo-montageSound effects
Video
VHS
Terror of the VervoidsOctober 1993BBCV 5009Part of the "The Trial of a Time Lord" Box set containing all 4 "The Trial of a Time Lord" stories Released on 3 cassette in a TARDIS shaped tin (BBCV 5008)
Video
VHS
The Colin Baker YearsMarch 1994BBCV 5324PhotoClip only Introduced and commented on by Colin Baker
Video
DVD
Terror of the VervoidsSeptember 2008BBCDVD 2422Part of the "The Trial of a Time Lord" Box set
Audio
CD
The 50th Anniversary CollectionDecember 2013Photo-montageOriginal Television Soundtracks
Video
Blu-Ray
Doctor Who: The Collection - Season 23 (Limited Edition)September 2019BBCBD 0471Photo-montageBlu-Ray Limited Edition boxed set containing 4 specially restored stories
Video
Blu-Ray
Doctor Who: The Collection - Season 23 (Standard Edition)October 2021BBCBD 0530Photo-montageBlu-Ray Standard Edition boxed set containing 4 specially restored stories


In Print

FormatTitleRelease Date (UK)PublisherAuthorCover ArtRemarks
Novel
Novel
Terror of the VervoidsFebruary 1988Target No. 125Pip and Jane BakerTony MaseroISBN: 0-426-20313-5
CD
CD
Terror of the VervoidsOctober 2013Target No. 125Pip and Jane BakerTony MaseroPart of "The Trial of a Time Lord - Volume 2" CD Audio Set. Audio version of the Target Novel read by Bonnie Langford (Melanie Bush).
Doctor Who CMS Magazine (In Vision)Issue 88 (Released: January 2000)
Doctor Who Magazine - PreviewIssue 118 (Released: November 1986)
Doctor Who Magazine - ReviewIssue 122 (Released: March 1987)
Doctor Who Magazine - NostalgiaIssue 183 (Released: February 1992)
Doctor Who Magazine - ArchiveIssue 323 (Released: November 2002)
Doctor Who Magazine - Time TeamIssue 400 (Released: October 2008)
Doctor Who Magazine - The Fact of FictionIssue 552 (Released: July 2020)
Doctor Who DVD FilesVolume 131 (Released: January 2014)

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Photo Gallery


The Doctor and Companion

 
Colin Baker
The Sixth Doctor

   

 
Bonnie Langford
Melanie Bush
 
   




On Release

Sound Effects CD Cover
Sound Effects CD Cover

BBC
AUDIO
VHS Box Set
VHS Box Set

BBC
VIDEO
Colin Baker Years VHS Video Cover
Colin Baker Years VHS Video Cover

BBC
VIDEO
DVD Cover
DVD Cover

BBC
VIDEO
   
The 50th Anniversary Collection Cover
The 50th Anniversary Collection Cover

BBC
AUDIO
The Collection Season 23 Limited Edition Blu-Ray Cover
The Collection Season 23 Limited Edition Blu-Ray Cover

BBC
VIDEO
The Collection Season 23 Standard Edition Blu-Ray Cover
The Collection Season 23 Standard Edition Blu-Ray Cover

BBC
VIDEO



In Print

Target Book Cover
Target Book Cover

Target
NOVEL
 
Target Audio CD Cover
Target Audio CD Cover

BBC
CD
   


Magazines

Doctor Who CMS Magazine (In Vision): Issue 88
Doctor Who CMS Magazine (In Vision): Issue 88

CMS
Doctor Who Magazine - Preview: Issue 118
Doctor Who Magazine - Preview: Issue 118

Marvel Comics
Doctor Who Magazine - Review: Issue 122
Doctor Who Magazine - Review: Issue 122

Marvel Comics
Doctor Who Magazine - Nostalgia: Issue 183
Doctor Who Magazine - Nostalgia: Issue 183

Marvel Comics
   
Doctor Who Magazine - Archive: Issue 323
Doctor Who Magazine - Archive: Issue 323

Marvel Comics
Doctor Who Magazine - Time Team: Issue 400
Doctor Who Magazine - Time Team: Issue 400

Marvel Comics
Doctor Who Magazine - The Fact of Fiction: Issue 552
Doctor Who Magazine - The Fact of Fiction: Issue 552

Marvel Comics
Doctor Who DVD Files: Volume 131
Doctor Who DVD Files: Volume 131

GE Fabbri
   


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